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View Full Version : Doug Dyment "One Bag" Review of the Western Flyer



Darcy
04-27-2009, 04:26 PM
Scroll down to read it. (http://www.onebag.com/dual-purpose-bags.html) What do you think?

Frank II
04-27-2009, 04:42 PM
First, he helps design bags for a company, I consider, your biggest competitor.

Second, he criticizes things on what "he" likes expecting that everyone else wants the same. That's not how to do a review.

I respect his opinion, and he offers a lot of good information, but I disagree with a lot of what he preaches.

falconea
04-27-2009, 06:40 PM
I think he raises a couple of questions that should be answered.

* Yes, the brain cell is not in the proper orientation when the WF is in backpack mode, but it's in a padded section so it's OK

* Your boarding pass won't fall out in backpack mode because .... (???)

I never wear a backpack without a sternum and waist strap - I wish I'd looked at it when I was in the store in January now! With the new waist strap I could be very, very tempted by this. The size looks very similar to the Zephyr (which I have) and the size of that is excellent.

Ah, well, shall have to wait and see what the Synapse comes out looking like!

Audrey

bnett
04-27-2009, 07:28 PM
I'm not sure about the comparison between the Sky Train and Western Flyer. I considered the Sky Train before buying the Aeronaut, and I think those are the two comparable bags.

BAN

backpack
04-27-2009, 09:58 PM
First, he helps design bags for a company, I consider, your biggest competitor.

Second, he criticizes things on what "he" likes expecting that everyone else wants the same. That's not how to do a review.

I respect his opinion, and he offers a lot of good information, but I disagree with a lot of what he preaches.


I didn't know the fact that he helps design bags so, I think his "I don't sell anything" line is dishonest.
Not wonder he is lyrical about the middle bag, he provided "free" consulting and got a free bag.
My feelings is that he hopes that his consulting will be permanent and compensated. Can it be called favoritism?


One of the line about the Western Flyer that makes me really unhappy, (seeing his lyrical prose about the other bag, I change the word to... mad) is this one:"That flair for style sometimes — in my view — clashes with functionality, which is why I have not previously recommended his otherwise appealing bags."


Sorry, but the other examples are just plain ugly.
The two other kind of bags in the One Bag review remind me of the ones I used to own.
I have seen those extremely thin and uncomfortable backpack straps too many times.
I give the review an F.

He was clever not to show the far superior backpack straps of the Western Flyer.


I am younger that this guy, but during my lifetime, I have traveled almost as much as he did, on two continents with a multitude of modes of transportation, except motorcycles.

I have used ugly bags, I have used badly made bags and I have bought, in Europe and the U.S, some heavy, bulky and expensive pieces of luggage.


Tom Bihn stylish designs AND functionality AND durability really cannot be beat.
Who can say in this forum or elsewhere I got x bag when I was in high school or college and it still looks new? Very few people, the ones who own a Tom Bihn bag.


I need stylish bags, especially in the day and age of carry-on or lose it luggage and draconian size restriction for carry-on items.

Since I have used Tom Bihn bags for trips, for the first time in my traveling life, I am not worried about luggage failure or the lost in cramped space snack, bottle of water or much needed medicine.


I know that I will find everything in a jiffy in crowded airports or dark hotel rooms. I can bring two laptops and take them out at security while concentrating on my other stuff so it doesn't get stolen.
My backpack won't open suddenly in an overstuffed metro car.
I carry all I need and don't look like a pack mule, a very big plus, if you ask me.

My Large Cafe Bag had been the greatest of second carry-on for short stateside trips, the Western Flyer or its big brother the Tristar will replace it for longer or overseas trips.


Unlike the reviewer, I am not a consultant with Tom Bihn Bags Inc.
I am not shy about sharing my opinion on this forum and sometimes throw good or wacky ideas up in cyberspace to see where they land.

Sometimes, I think of something I need to organize my things and next thing I know, Tom Bihn comes up with a solution, like the 3D Clear Organizer Cube.

maverick
04-27-2009, 10:05 PM
i don't have the western flyer, but reading the product description, i see that it "has annex clips that can either be removed or clip a Horizontal or Vertical Brain Cell laptop case securely."

so if i understand correctly - if you usually carry the western flyer as a backpack, you could use a vertical brain cell.

if you usually carry the western flyer with the shoulder strap or the handle, you could use the horizontal brain cell.

that way, your brain cell is in the correct orientation most of the time.

and as you mentioned, the padding still protects your laptop that is inside for the few times that it is oriented the other way.


I think he raises a couple of questions that should be answered.

* Yes, the brain cell is not in the proper orientation when the WF is in backpack mode, but it's in a padded section so it's OK


i'd also like to comment on the observation in the review that questions the usefulness of the open top pocket when the western flyer is carried vertically as a backpack. if you look at this picture (http://www.tombihn.com/Merchant2/images/wfbackpack1.jpg) on the product page, you will notice that the opening of the open pocket curves around so that this pocket remains very usable for tickets and such when the bag is in the vertical position. at least, that's how i see it.

Sco1t
04-28-2009, 12:28 AM
Hello,

Three things strike me upon reading his review:

1. I get the feeling he is getting too big for his boots.

2. I do not think he has actually used the bag for any period of time. For instance, you can bundle wrap clothes and put them in the main compartment whilst using the divider in the other compartment to separate a pair of shoes and a packing cube. Also the outer unzipped pocket will hold a 1.5L water pouch without fear of it falling out, you just fold over the end part of the pouch and it 'locks' itself in there.

3. He lacks the imagination to put all the design features to effective use. I just get the feeling that he thinks his way is the best way of travelling and that any bag that falls foul of his requirements is therefore somehow inferior.

That being said, it was in reading Doug's website that I realised that 'one-bagging' was the way to go. He has some truly fantastic advice and is worth paying attention too. I guess for that reason his review is so important to a company such as Tom Bihn. It could have been more thoughtful.

All the best,
Scott

timothy
04-28-2009, 12:41 AM
I don't think the review is as harsh as several others seem to; not everyone will have the same opinion of any given product (whether it's a car, a bag, or a meal).

Small bags have trade-offs in organization and division, and Dyment doesn't like all of the WF's trade-offs, but note that this is without doubt still a positive review of the bag.

My thought on the ticket pocket: I wouldn't mind if it had a zipper or a snap, so that a ticket etc. might be folded and carried in there semi-securely when carrying it in backpack mode. But it is what it is; I see that sort of pocket as a modal bonus feature (it adds to ease of use while carrying it over the shoulder or by the briefcase handle). It's sort of like a roof-rack mount on a car; hard to complain that the mount alone won't help you carry stuff when the rack's not attached. Secure or not against the forces of gravity (I suspect that friction & tension would keep things in this pocket in there pretty well), I doubt I'd keep anything valuable in this pocket while carrying the bag as a backpack anyhow -- it would be visible to others, easy to grab, and out of both sight and easy reach of me as the wearer. Aren't you glad that airplane tickets nowadays tend to be of low value in / of themselves? Still, I wouldn't want someone to take my boarding passes. Upshot: I find this an odd complaint, but people are turned on / off by different things.

scotlib
04-28-2009, 01:00 AM
I did not get an exactly unfriendly vibe from the review. He does write, "A surprising but welcome recent offering ..." It seems a bit more like he would not likely use the WF himself, but figured he ought to (had to?) include it because it does meet the specs of what he is doing with his web site.

I thought two bits were funny (to me): "The main compartment lacks tie-downs. ... And finally, the larger of the two main compartments is not very deep: four inches will not allow for much in the way of a bundle wrap ..."

When I considered taking my WF on my trip I put my bundle for the main compartment in and got the zipper shut. There was no way I needed tie-downs, lol! At he notes, it is "not very deep."

Now that I am trying to write a "review" of his review, I am confused. To start out with a note of the dimensions and then complain about sizing? And to complain about the two compartment design when he did not do so for the Sky Train?

Eh, it is a review, and while not very positive, it is not negative, exactly, either. Anyone making the leap of considering a purchase will be reading many, many reviews (at least, I did).

maverick
04-28-2009, 04:18 AM
i'm glad others have picked up on the same vibe i did reading that review. i thought it was just me :-o.

hamster
04-28-2009, 06:55 AM
I have to disagree on the take most of you got from the review. Sure the review was not glowing... but I don't think that is because of his relationship with Red Oxx.

If you read his reviews of other bags, including the skytrian, none of them are written in a very excited way. It seems like he only features bags on his site that he recommends, so the fact the western flyer is even on the site is a recommendation.

The other thing about the lack of tiedown straps... your opinion may differ on it, but if you read his whole site you can see that clamshell opening and tiedown straps are two of his major criteria for judging a bag. He does not seem to be a huge backpack fan.

FBBrown: Of course he criticizes what HE likes. He can't very well review the product from MY perspective or from yours. All reviews are subjective opinions.

Bnet: He never compared the Skytrain and western flyer. In fact if you look at the text and the page formatting you see that there is a clear separation between the bags he is comparing and the "alternative." The only reason the western flyer is on the same page as the skytrain is because they are both convertable bags.

Backpack: There is no such thing as a completely impartial review. That being said, if he had intentions of being dishonest he would not have to disclose his involvement with Red Oxx.

To me the all of his reviews are kindof basic introductions to suitable products. But these are far from being complete reviews. I prefer the reviewing style of "Brad" from 1bag1world.

pretzelb
04-28-2009, 10:58 AM
I never felt that Doug realized his own bias and it shows in his emails and reviews. I know that I'm biased, and I am a fan of both Red Oxx and Tom Bihn, so it's easy for me to rate both companies and know that I like both. But I really don't think Doug has good vision into himself and has a hard time separating his bias from being objective. Or I don't think he sees the need to be objective. To me, this reads as someone who does has a bad vibe against TB. Here are some thoughts:


The first two items are reviewed basically with just stats save for one comment on a suggested improvement. The WF however is less about stats and more about the good/bad.
At the top Doug states "They lose the sophistication and comfort of a full suspension system (with padded hip belt, sternum strap, supporting struts, etc.) in order to provide more compartmentalization. They will never be as optimal as bags designed for one or the other specific purpose." This implies style is important but his favorite bag the Air Boss is hardly stylish at all.
In the past Doug has praised should bags for the business traveller I have yet to hear how he thinks anyone can use the Air Boss with the claw strap on a suit or shirt and not have it wrinkle you to death. Yet a backpack strap is going to lose "sophistication".
Doesn't the partition come out in the WF? So the argument over weight is moot? Plus this means the bag suits those who like to use pouches and those who do not. Instead of wording this as a plus it's a minus because of his preference. It's not worded as his preference but instead a knock against the WF.
He seems obsessed with the fact that the WF CAN be used as a backpack and instead views it as MUST. Sure the side pocket might be an issue then but it's not the only way to use the bag. He repeats this theme a few times as if there was no option for a shoulder strap or handles on the top. You might as well knock all 3 bags for having extra weight for their should strap options because all 3 are designed to be backpacks using this logic.
Regarding the pocket sleeve, I have to say I don't like open pockets. I never trust that things will stay in or get stolen. Put my boarding pass in that? Not me. So, in this case I will admit I also do not like an open pocket for anything but a water bottle.
Why exactly is he knocking the size over and over again? If it's too small for a specific purpose then that's fine but he isn't reviewing it for a specific purpose. It's almost like he knocks it for being smaller than the others without trying to review it's merit on whether or not it's good for a 3 day trip (for example).
He opened with how you lose stuff like the sternum strap in these hybrids then goes on to say the sternum strap for the WF really isn't needed on a bag so small. Seems like a contradication to me. Also, I think Doug must be a physical tank because he thinks the Air Boss on the shoulder is a breeze. Either that or he has a crazy ability to ignore pain and discomfort. I'm pretty fit and the Air Boss annoyed me to no end.


I'm sorry, but if you start where he says
There are elements of this bag that are less than ideal. it all reads like a review to me. Then I go back and read the other products and it's all stats. It's an entire parargraph of what he doesn't like about the bag while the other two didn't get much of anything. In fact, he lumps a "review" in the summary paragraph and basically just re-iterates the stats to let the reader pick their own favorite.

For example he says one has 2 compartments and the other 3 but doesn't offer which HE thinks is better. But when it came to the WF he was quick to inject his preference to a feature.

Just a strange negative vibe if you ask me.

KarlJ
04-28-2009, 01:15 PM
I have to disagree on the take most of you got from the review. Sure the review was not glowing... but I don't think that is because of his relationship with Red Oxx.

If you read his reviews of other bags, including the SkyTrain, none of them are written in a very excited way. It seems like he only features bags on his site that he recommends, so the fact the Western Flyer is even on the site is a recommendation.

I'll agree with you. In the context of who he is and what he represents (one-bag, wheel-less travel, and employing packing cubes and bundle packing), any product he reviews will more than likely be weighed heavily on that criteria unless he says otherwise. And I think it's specific enough a task to force a certain amount of objectivity on his part.

falconea
04-28-2009, 02:17 PM
What's amusing is that nearly all of his issues are nicely addressed in the Tristar.

Audrey

KarlJ
04-28-2009, 02:51 PM
What's amusing is that nearly all of his issues are nicely addressed in the Tristar.

Audrey

You know... you may be right! Interesting!

moriond
04-28-2009, 04:41 PM
What's amusing is that nearly all of his issues are nicely addressed in the Tristar.

Audrey

Yes, that was my thought, too. Except that he doesn't like the ability to divide up compartments (zipper) on principle.

moriond

maverick
04-28-2009, 06:10 PM
What's amusing is that nearly all of his issues are nicely addressed in the Tristar.

Audrey

indeed :)


Yes, that was my thought, too. Except that he doesn't like the ability to divide up compartments (zipper) on principle.

moriond


it appears the divider zips out and isn't in the way if he prefers not to divide up the compartment. per the product page:

"The front compartment can be further divided left and right, with a zip out divider."

moriond
04-28-2009, 06:18 PM
I prefer the reviewing style of "Brad" from 1bag1world.

The most informative reviews, discussion, and comments I've found have been the ones by Brad of One Bag One World and Kevin of Practical Hacks and visitors to their sites:
First Take on the Tom Bihn Aeronaut (http://www.practicalhacks.com/2009/04/13/first-take-tom-bihn-aeronaut-travel-bag/) at Practical Hacks
First Take on the Tom Bihn Western Flyer (http://www.practicalhacks.com/2009/03/23/first-take-tom-bihn-western-flyer-bag/) at Practical Hacks
Going Boldly with the Aeronaut (http://onebagger.squarespace.com/blog/2007/8/1/going-boldly-with-the-aeronaut-full-user-review.html) at One Bag One World
The Tom Bihn Western Flyer (http://onebagger.squarespace.com/blog/2008/2/8/tom-bihn-western-flyer-full-user-review.html) at One Bag One World


Both these sites have extensive reviews of other bags in addition to the Tom Bihn reviews that make it easy to make cross-evaluations of how each bag will suit particular users. I did find Doug Dymant's review of interest, but less informative for many purposes than the discussions at the other two sites. I think that Doug simply doesn't review bags that diverge substantially from his design philosophy and it is consequently more difficult (for me, at least) to evaluate some of his statements. A useful review is one that lets me judge how well a bag will work for me -- I don't need to agree with the reviewer's point of view, but I need to be able to get the information I require for a decision from his comments, or the other comments on the site.

I'm not sure about the source of the comment about "That flair for style sometimes  in my view  clashes with functionality, which is why I have not previously recommended his otherwise appealing bags." I suspect it may be based on fundamental beliefs that strict rectangular shapes are most efficient (and the Aeronaut is not a pure rectangle) and that bags should open flat for maximum access (another thing the Aeronaut does not do). One thing that Tom excels at in all his bag designs is making bags that scale well for people of a wide range of builds. I've noticed in a number of forums on other sites that people will recommend other bags, and then I'll read some review from someone who is 5'5" or shorter about how much they wanted to like that bag but it simply didn't work for their frame. Even a bag with a strictly rectangular build needs to be styled for a range of users to carry comfortably.

Just my 2 cents.

moriond

ozone
04-28-2009, 06:28 PM
Like some others, I didn't think Doug Dyment's review was all that harsh. Obviously he has his likes and dislikes. I know many people seem to like the Red Oxx bags, but frankly, the plastic tubing handles on (whatever) just look ugly to me - but that doesn't mean the bags are not functional and attractive to some people.

I do have to admit that the Western Flyer does seem to meet just about everything he emphasizes.

And yes, he does have a rather entertaining yet slightly off writing style. Hey, he's an engineer, what do you expect? :rolleyes: (So am I!)

backpack
04-28-2009, 07:39 PM
indeed :)




it appears the divider zips out and isn't in the way if he prefers not to divide up the compartment. per the product page:

"The front compartment can be further divided left and right, with a zip out divider."

Same here, when I saw the picture of the gorgeous Tristar, I said to myself: "somebody is going to have to eat his words".

Besides, the gorgeous Tristar or the unique Aeronaut are much better contenders, size wise, to a fair review against the two other bags.

We'll see.

pretzelb
04-29-2009, 06:48 AM
I'm not so sure Doug will change his mind that much with the Tristar.

It's listed with a volume of 2000 and the Sky Train is at 2340. He already thinks the hybrid types are sacrificing too much and is barely giving the nod to the Sky Train. My guess is he will still say "too small" for the Tristar. But I'm confused now because the Air Boss is listed at 2184 and I thought that carried more than the Sky Train.

The more I read what others had to say the more I think Doug's position is something like "The perfect bag is the Air Boss so let's see how well this bag stacks up to that standard". I suppose he is entitled to his view but it's harder for me to digest information from someone who I know is close minded. It would be one thing if the scope was very limited like evaluating the best hammer for nailing in 2 inch nails on picket fences. But to be so focused on an item that has so many varied uses it hard to relate to.

backpack
04-29-2009, 08:30 AM
As someone mentioned earlier, the problem is the other bags are stats and the Western Flyer gets a negative review.

I also chuckle at the "new" offering from Tom Bihn Bags, the company has been there since 1974.

He might have received one the first Western Flyers with the one shoulder strap which users and prospective owners barked against in this forum.
If so, he should have disclosed that.


I don't bundle wrap because I don't want to have to unwrap everything after a long flight just to find my toiletries.

Using the Brain Bag, I roll and plastic bag most things with the ones I will need first or the most wrinkle prone on top.
I need a second bag for longer trips which require dress clothes. I will pack cube items in there.

His review is not helping me or others because his choice are bulky bags, those get heavy really fast so have to be checked and risk being lost, or a stylish slimline Western Flyer that he disses.
He doesn't mention on how the bags wear when they are full and if people without the built of a quarterback can carry them.

MaggieScratch
04-30-2009, 04:39 AM
Doug Dyment's site has a lot of great information for those wishing to try one-bag travel. However, it does have a certain tone, and that tone is "my way is best, you silly creature, so just receive my pronouncements as though Moses brought them down from the mountain." Doug's way is best for Doug. He helped to design the Air Boss to be a bag that's the best for Doug's way. Therefore, every bag that is not the Air Boss will not be the best for Doug's way, and will receive a lesser review than the Air Boss. It's his site, and it's perfectly okay for him to express his opinions, but people who recommend his site, I think, need to realize that. Doug's way will not necessarily be the best way for everyone else.

And a side rant: what is it with men and ironing? They're studying so hard for a way to transport clothing without wrinkling it, and every business-class hotel either has an iron and board in the room or available with a phone call to the front desk. It won't kill you to iron a shirt, guys. It takes five minutes if you know what you're doing. I can see being concerned about suits, as they are hard to press on one's own, but if worst comes to worst, the hotel can usually send them out for you, and it's all expensed anyway. And if you're on vacation, it only takes a couple of minutes to press a shirt and who cares if you're wrinkled? You're on vacation! I don't get the obsession with completely wrinkle-free travel.

I defy even Doug Dyment with his custom-designed bags to pack full Regency kit (long gown with gathered Empire waist and in my case a petticoat lining, headpiece, fan, reticule, slippers, gloves, and jewelry) along with other clothes needed for a long weekend in one bag, as I do for an annual event, and not have to iron it upon arriving. Those gowns have a LOT of fabric in them. The first time that the friend with whom I usually share a room for this event brought her Regency gown, her mother packed it very carefully with tissue paper in its own suitcase (which was checked, and which Northwest lost for a day, causing a slight panic) and she STILL had to iron it! Last year I one-bagged by rolling my gown loosely around a bag with the accessories in its own packing cube and ironed it when I arrived. The hard part was finding somewhere to hang it with the train free of the ground.

hamster
04-30-2009, 05:38 AM
I'm not so sure Doug will change his mind that much with the Tristar.

It's listed with a volume of 2000 and the Sky Train is at 2340. He already thinks the hybrid types are sacrificing too much and is barely giving the nod to the Sky Train. My guess is he will still say "too small" for the Tristar. But I'm confused now because the Air Boss is listed at 2184 and I thought that carried more than the Sky Train.

RedOxx arrives at those volumes by simply multiplying the external dimensions. So really that isn't the interior volume, rather the exterior volume. Or how much water a packed bag would displace.

I've evaluated both of their bags and I really see why Doug loves the Airboss. To me it was very easy to pack and the large center pocket allowed me to cram in all my electronics and shoes etc without risk of wrinkling my clothes.

The skytrain on the other hand is much better to carry because of the backpack option, but with only two compartments is less ideal for separating nicknacks from clothing. It ends up looking lumpy. I test packed both bags with the same huge load, but I found the airboss held that load more gracefully.

I'm really really looking forward to the Tristar because for me it looks like it would be the perfect bag. But with a trip coming up on May 4th and me not being able to return the skytrain after that I unfortunately won't ever get a chance to try it.

Darn pre-order.

backpack
04-30-2009, 10:07 AM
RedOxx arrives at those volumes by simply multiplying the external dimensions. So really that isn't the interior volume, rather the exterior volume. Or how much water a packed bag would displace.

I've evaluated both of their bags and I really see why Doug loves the Airboss. To me it was very easy to pack and the large center pocket allowed me to cram in all my electronics and shoes etc without risk of wrinkling my clothes.

The skytrain on the other hand is much better to carry because of the backpack option, but with only two compartments is less ideal for separating nicknacks from clothing. It ends up looking lumpy. I test packed both bags with the same huge load, but I found the airboss held that load more gracefully.

I'm really really looking forward to the Tristar because for me it looks like it would be the perfect bag. But with a trip coming up on May 4th and me not being able to return the skytrain after that I unfortunately won't ever get a chance to try it.

Darn pre-order.


I would call Darcy as soon as you can, if I were you, they might have more than one Tristar or sell the other bag on ebay and get the Tristar after the trip. :)

peregrina
04-30-2009, 04:26 PM
Doug Dyment's site has its merits. After nearly ten years of carry-on travel, he convinced me to move on from my rollers to a soft case bag. I read all his reviews but despite all his praise, wasn't convinced the Air Boss was for me. From his site I got to the One Bag blog and read more about Tom Bihn... the rest is history.

Some people would rather have a more rectangular bag but the Aeronaut fits my style of packing much better. I really like the side pockets for my shoes and the large middle compartment works fine for my preferred packing method (http://guerson.wordpress.com/2008/05/18/packing-the-aeronaut/) - a mix of bundle wrapping with some tight rolling.

moriond
05-01-2009, 02:24 PM
And a side rant: what is it with men and ironing? They're studying so hard for a way to transport clothing without wrinkling it, and every business-class hotel either has an iron and board in the room or available with a phone call to the front desk. It won't kill you to iron a shirt, guys. It takes five minutes if you know what you're doing. I can see being concerned about suits, as they are hard to press on one's own, but if worst comes to worst, the hotel can usually send them out for you, and it's all expensed anyway. And if you're on vacation, it only takes a couple of minutes to press a shirt and who cares if you're wrinkled? You're on vacation! I don't get the obsession with completely wrinkle-free travel.
Hmm,

It's true that you can ask for ironing boards and irons, but I remember the startled expressions (on the faces of both men and women) when I asked for these at one of the Ritz Carlton hotels (I think they expect people to use their dry cleaning services). And they never have sleeveboards, so it's hard to do as good a job ironing sleeves. You might not always be staying at a hotel when you travel. I mostly just pack clothing made of fabrics that travel well.

Just
05-01-2009, 09:23 PM
Hmm,

It's true that you can ask for ironing boards and irons, but I remember the startled expressions (on the faces of both men and women) when I asked for these at one of the Ritz Carlton hotels (I think they expect people to use their dry cleaning services).

See, it's Ritz Carlton - they're probably thinking, "What? You're on an expense account, right? Why do anything yourself?"

pretzelb
05-02-2009, 05:36 PM
And a side rant: what is it with men and ironing? They're studying so hard for a way to transport clothing without wrinkling it, and every business-class hotel either has an iron and board in the room or available with a phone call to the front desk. It won't kill you to iron a shirt, guys. It takes five minutes if you know what you're doing. I can see being concerned about suits, as they are hard to press on one's own, but if worst comes to worst, the hotel can usually send them out for you, and it's all expensed anyway. And if you're on vacation, it only takes a couple of minutes to press a shirt and who cares if you're wrinkled? You're on vacation! I don't get the obsession with completely wrinkle-free travel.

I like to think I'm a fairly smart and competent guy, but I can not iron for the life of me. The best I can do is wrinkle free polo shirts that are almost perfect with no ironing. Give me a pleat in any pant or short and I somehow manage to iron it so it's half way un-pleated. I've tried for years and cursed a storm but I can't figure out what should be so simple.

As far as wrinkle free travel, even on vacation I don't want to look like a total bum. I know it's not right to judge a person by their outer appearance but I also think you can tell a bit about a person by how well they care for their appearance. It's kind of like going to breakfast on vacation with a bad case of bed head and telling everyone you just don't care that you look like you just got out of bed. Sure it's probably ok, but it does send a message. Personally, I feel self conscious if I'm over wrinkled even at a very casual vacation spot.

MaggieScratch
05-03-2009, 12:31 PM
See, it's Ritz Carlton - they're probably thinking, "What? You're on an expense account, right? Why do anything yourself?"

Pretty much! :)


I like to think I'm a fairly smart and competent guy, but I can not iron for the life of me.

I couldn't iron, either, until my sister (who actually LIKES to iron) showed me how when I was a teenager. That being said, I rarely iron anymore--I try to buy wash and wear stuff that looks good out of the dryer.

To iron a shirt: iron the collar (both sides) flat. Iron one sleeve (lay it out flat on the board; if you don't want a crease in the sleeve, don't iron right to the edge). Iron the cuff (both sides). Iron the other sleeve and cuff. Iron the inside of the button placket, buttonhole side; iron the outside of the placket and the rest of the front panel. Use the pointed tip of the board to provide support for tight areas. Iron the back of the button side of the placket (carefully if they are plastic buttons), iron the front side of the placket, using the tip of the iron to work in between buttons, and then the rest of that panel. Iron the back of the shirt, once again using the tip of the board to support tight spots near the armholes. That's it! You just have to be organized. I like light starch, too, on cotton shirts.

The trick, I think, is learning to work around the tight areas around the collars and armholes and cuffs, for which you use the tip and edges of the board for support, and the tip of the iron. You learn with practice.

Frank II
05-03-2009, 12:51 PM
Forget the iron...get a steamer. Or get Downey Wrinkle Release. Works great.

moriond
05-08-2009, 08:03 AM
Forget the iron...get a steamer. Or get Downey Wrinkle Release. Works great.
I was wondering about this remark; see here (http://onebagger.squarespace.com/blog/2009/4/23/travel-laundry-killer-app.html) for more details and links (http://www.downyez.com/buy.html).