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KarlJ
08-13-2009, 04:18 PM
Plain, Ruled, or Squared?

Personally, I have them all, but lean toward squared as my first choice. Just curious where everyone's notetaking weapon of choice was.

Last night the cashier at Barnes & Noble engaged me in a discussion over the merits of each type... as she rang up my purchase: pocket squared hardcovers.

Jenne
08-13-2009, 05:02 PM
Squared! 8X5 sized. Moleskine hard cover.

When I go to Italy at the end of the month, I'll be in squared-paper heaven! I'm definitely going to buy notebooks!

maverick
08-13-2009, 06:05 PM
hi!

i've used moleskine notebooks - the pocket sized lined and squared, as well as the lined large sized lined.

i've also kept the really small soft back ones that fit well into the pockets inside of the side effect. they have tear out sheets if you need to hand a note off to someone.

i've used rhodia pads, and like the feel of the paper. but i haven't used any of their journals.

while the moleskines worked well, after i fill the large one i'm using now, i would like to try something else. ideally, i'd like to make my own and wrap the binding with cayenne 500d cordura. but there are only so many hours in a day :). i'm looking forward to seeing the soon to be released field journal from tom bihn!

KarlJ
08-13-2009, 07:40 PM
...i've used rhodia pads, and like the feel of the paper. but i haven't used any of their journals.

I found out about Rhodia pads while shopping for Moleskines. The store I was in had a dismal inventory, but had a few Rhodia so I bought a handful of them for about $1.25 each. I have them all over the place: bags, backpacks, car glovebox, etc. Love the vellum paper in those Rhodia pads. So I got a couple extras, plus the No. 08 for my shopping/grocery list. I understand Rhodia has a Moleskine-esque notebook now, but it reportedly uses a different paper.


... i'm looking forward to seeing the soon to be released field journal from tom bihn!

Yep, same here... though I'm probably pretty well-stocked for now. Still, will be interested to see the Tom Bihn product.

Radio bug
08-14-2009, 03:15 AM
Although I have squared, lined, and unlined Moleskines that I use, I prefer the squared ones. Most of mine are the pocket size.

Shiva
08-24-2009, 09:29 AM
I also like the Levenger paper pads. These come in a larger Junior and Letter size; but I find them the most versatile for managing my gazillion projects at the University. It is ideal for taking notes and moving them between notebooks cos of the circa system. For bags and such: I too tend to use the softback moleskins. I also use the Levenger cards--both the standard 3 x5 and the wallet sized cards quite a bit.

Frank II
08-24-2009, 10:09 AM
I've tried all types of Moleskines but they just don't work for me. I like a ruled book but it needs to be wide ruled. I hate writing in between the small lines of the Moleskine and the plain ones make my horrible writing even more disorganized.

Does anyone know of a Moleskine sized notebook that is wide ruled?

savoyard
08-24-2009, 11:26 AM
.. the paper just does not work well with fountain pen ink. Too much bleed through to the other side, and $10 is too much for a notebook whose page count is effectively cut in half.

Any fountain pen users out there who can recommend another brand of notebook in the Moleskine form factor??

maverick
08-24-2009, 11:50 AM
.. the paper just does not work well with fountain pen ink. Too much bleed through to the other side, and $10 is too much for a notebook whose page count is effectively cut in half.

Any fountain pen users out there who can recommend another brand of notebook in the Moleskine form factor??

hey darcy,

can you advise what kind of paper the field journal will take? will it play well with fountain pens?

thanks!

Darcy
08-24-2009, 12:11 PM
hey darcy,

can you advise what kind of paper the field journal will take? will it play well with fountain pens?


I think sketch paper would work for a fountain pen. We'd like to offer sketch paper as an option with the Field Journal Notebook, but so far that is proving to be surprisingly difficult. If we aren't able to offer sketch paper, one could always buy 8-1/2 x 11 sketch paper, cut it in half, use a hole punch on it, and then insert it into the Field Journal Notebook.

yeti
08-24-2009, 01:09 PM
I've had good luck using fountain pens with Rhodia, Clairefontaine, and a number of Japanese notebooks. The paper is smooth enough that the ink doesn't feather, but it does take a little longer to dry. I also haven't had good luck using my fountain pens with Moleskine, so I no longer buy them. Clairefontaine seems to sell a variety of formats (vertical, horizontal, ruled, squared, spiral-bound), so I tend to stick with that brand.

MtnMan
08-25-2009, 02:11 PM
I'd like to learn more about portable, refillable notebook-type portable tablets like the ones mentioned here. I want to make sure that if I get something like this, it will be a brand-name, high-quality setup that will be easy to find paper refills for. Where do I begin?

MagicTiki
08-26-2009, 07:02 AM
I have carried a hardbound sketchbook forever for keeping notes, jotting ideas, rough sketching, and the like. Several manufacturers make similar styles, but Pro-Art art the ones I have been using lately:

http://www.dickblick.com/products/proart-hardbound-sketchbooks/

I like the 5-1/2" by 8" myself. The 65 lb acid free paper will pretty much take any writing substance without bleeding/soaking (ink, marker, pencil, charcoal, etc.), and the hard bound backing makes it extremely durable.

I have yet to find a replacement, but I am anxiously awaiting the Field Journal Notebook to see if it presents a worthy competitor. :)

savoyard
08-26-2009, 10:59 AM
Yeti - thanks for the tip on Clairefontaine. Know of any bricks & mortar stores that carry them??

yeti
08-26-2009, 11:03 AM
I'm able to get a good selection of Clairefontaine notebooks at the University student store -- I've seen them at both UCLA and UC Davis. A shop that carries a decent selection of fountain pens and stationery would likely have them also.

maverick
08-26-2009, 11:05 AM
Yeti - thanks for the tip on Clairefontaine. Know of any bricks & mortar stores that carry them??

my local container store (http://www.containerstore.com/find/store.jhtml?store=TYC) in vienna, va carries them. i imagine that they would have it in their other locations also.

ex machina
11-07-2009, 07:50 PM
I use a moleskin to vent (therapeutically efficacious) and a junior Circa to track my lists and notes. I also use a circa PDA. I am a recent convert to Circa and got a great big cache of discs by shopping on eBay. Now I just have to vet out how I will organize my Circa. I think I will fuse the junior and the PDA into one unit. I got some 1" discs I can do that with now. What I would like to know is will the field journal be compatible with circa? I would really like a housing that is both protective and featureful (while looking stunning no less.) This sounds like a job for Tom Bihn! Dunh dunh DUNH! (That man should have his own comic book.) ;)

Armed with his adamantium cafe bag, mild mannered bag designer Tom Bihn, becomes Captain Cafe where ever the cries of travelers are heard! Producing his Magikal Sewing Machine from the limitless depths of his cafe bag (its bigger on the inside, like a TARDIS) the needs of travelers are met in brilliant living color! Producing bags that cause envious UFOs to travel to Earth seeking a purchase, the galaxy stands in waitful awe!

Maybe Tom can build a bag called World Peace? : ) Stranger things...

ex machina
11-28-2009, 08:20 PM
This is my Moleskine and my 2 TB stickers. I left room for a release of another TB sticker. ;)

I like the Red Oxx sticker, and I did buy a dozen of the monkey fists from them, but no bags. The monkey fists are fantastic. :)

notmensa
11-28-2009, 11:19 PM
I use the Moleskine Volant Pocket size, lined for my journal. Cheapest place for me to buy them for delivery to Australia is through <a href="http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/">The Book Depository</a>.

I came across Guildhall notebooks via <a href="http://blackcover.net/?p=36#more-36">Black Cover</a> and purchased them on the <a href="http://www.ukge.co.uk/UK/guildhall.asp">UK Geologists Equipment</a> website. Ink takes a little longer to dry on the paper compared to Moleskine, but the notebook itself is lovely.

O-Check Design Graphics is another brand that has lovely paper. It's Korean and I get through <a href="http://notemaker.com.au/">Notemaker</a> in Australia.

Finally, I use Uniball Signo 207 pens, but with the 5mm refills. The ink flows nicely and the thin tip makes my poor handwriting look a little neater!



[Yes, I have thought about my carbon footprint. I've also thought about the many jobs my international purchases help support across the globe.]

ex machina
11-29-2009, 12:52 AM
I also picked up in the last week a three pack of the Moleskine Cahiers (http://www.moleskineus.com/cahier-pocket-graph.html), squared journals. They are working out quite well, I use them sideways. The size is 3x5, and they are slim. I keep them in my shirt pocket against my pocket briefcase (http://www.levenger.com/PAGETEMPLATES/PRODUCT/Product.asp?Params=Category=11-76|Level=2-3|pageid=2398). I find I am going through less notecards for the pocket briefcase. I like the way it functions for me and I will be keeping the Cahiers or similar as a regular carry item.

I use Retro51 Tornados (http://www.retro51.com/fwi_home.html) as my everyday pens. One regular size (http://www.retro51.com/fwi_tor_classiclacquers.html), one Bigshot (http://www.retro51.com/fwi_tor_bigshots.html) size. I also have a Parker Jotter (http://www.parkerpen.com/en/discovery/product/jotter) (in brushed stainless steel) as a back-up.

All my pens are ballpoint/rollerball. I use to use the Fisher inks (http://www.spacepen.com/refills.aspx) because of the no leak nature of them and the tremendous amount of writing you get from one. But I also find that ink, while amazing as inks go, not flow-y enough for my everyday use. I was in a quandary, and experimenting for awhile. I did land upon an ink I am quite happy with now. My main in is now the SCHMIDT® easyFLOW 9000 (http://www.schmidttechnology.de/en/schreibgeraete/produkte/easyflow/c_1_9.htm). Designed as a hybrid between a rollerball and a ballpoint. Writes easily, responds well to a light touch but can handle a heavy hand, dries quickly, doesn't bleed. Stays fresh and ready uncapped for up to a year. I just had 10 refills delivered. I want a nice stock so I won't run out. :)

backpack
11-29-2009, 10:10 AM
If the Field Notebook could have an horizontal slit on the top of the inner back cover, one could insert a junior size writing pad.

They are available in a whole range of paper and price from the lovely smooth
Rhodia to ones made with really cheap paper found in bulk on the stationery shelves in supermarkets.

One could make its own writing pad using printer paper cut in half With a guillotine or a scrapbook paper cutter and held together with Circa, Myndology or binder rings.

The backing can be made of two layers of cereal boxes cardboard, an older pad or bought.

I know that stationary stores or office stores with copy areas can make a
writing pad with any kind of paper. I know they can do it in letter size, junior size, I don't know.


Since we know that Field Notebook is going to be junior size, it is time to go to the D.I.Y page and plot the templates ones want to use.

I have done that with my Filofax, I wanted to use dot matrix printer paper with the templates found in AppleWorks it was a long time ago before the DIY pages were created and there was still good programming on tv.

Jenne
11-30-2009, 12:30 AM
I've replied before on this thread, but now I am trying out an alternative to the Moleskine. I wanted something I could be "sure" about (on labor issues and such,) so I'm trying out Barnes and Noble's new Ecosystem (http://www.ecosystemlife.com/) notebooks. I got the 2010 weekly planner, an "artist" (blank) in my favorite 5 X 8 size, and have ordered the "architect" (grid) in the same size. There's a lot of "marketing" involved that I am a bit suspicious of (like registering your notebook and "building your own," which amounts to ordering one in stock. A bit disingenuous, I think.) The paper is bright white and I prefer the mellow ivory of the Moleskine, but the Ecosystem claims to be made of 100 percent recycled materials and made in the US. (Also, no leather involved. I will not use leather.) I haven't written on it yet, so I don't know how my Ohto Fine fountain pen will work. They cost slightly less than the Moleskine, but not enough to be a dealbreaker if price is your first concern.

Akilae
12-01-2009, 09:58 PM
I use Cavallini notebooks with great satisfaction. B&N used to carry a healthy selection, after Moleskines reared their ugly heads my Cavallinis have been slowly replaced, sigh...

katiya
12-03-2009, 03:10 AM
Ah, someone mentioned Moleskine. I'm way too addicted to them, used to buy them in bulk off an ebay seller. I was visiting my parents in Louisiana at the beginning of the year and a bookstore in a mall was going out of business. I picked up a huge cache of the large ruled and graph styles for about $2.50 a notebook. I spent around $200 and I think the cashier thought I was insane.

Every year I get the Large Daily Planner as well. It's true Moleskine bleeds with anything beyond a regular ball point or pencil but I work my way around that if need be. I wish Moleskine made a big notebook size for regular journaling needs but I would be in nirvana if they managed that. I usually grab a cheap Picadilly for that function.

DQBunny
12-03-2009, 12:12 PM
I wish Moleskine made a big notebook size for regular journaling needs but I would be in nirvana if they managed that. I usually grab a cheap Picadilly for that function.

When I was at Barnes and Noble the other day, I did see some large 8.5x11 essay books. Is this the type of Mokeskine that you're looking for?

I've been using Moleskine for the past couple of years, but I did get my hands on the Ecosystem books and really liked the feel of them. I plugged in the number of one in my iPhone and discovered it was mostly assembled in Lewiston, Maine, where I lived for about 18 months. I was pretty pleased to see that. I can't afford one now, but I may grab one of the author ones in the near future, along with one of the 2010 planners.

ex machina
12-03-2009, 01:56 PM
I use Cavallini notebooks with great satisfaction. B&N used to carry a healthy selection, after Moleskines reared their ugly heads my Cavallinis have been slowly replaced, sigh...

I was looking for stationers to visit in Manhattan, and I came across a website called thedailyplanner.com (http://www.thedailyplanner.com). They have an assortment of the Cavallini journals (http://www.thedailyplanner.com/notebooks-journals-cavallini-journals-c-116_253.html) for sale.

They are a parallel online business of http://www.lincolnstationers.com which was around for 25 years in midtown Manhattan as I understand it, but got squeezed out of their retail location by rising rents (Manhattan rents are whacko.) They are online only until they find a new location with a reasonable rent.

backpack
12-03-2009, 07:24 PM
Since Tom Bihn blog mentioned Rhodia Drive and Rhodia Drive mentioned Tom Bihn blog, I believe it is ok to mention the website of Exaclair, the U.S distributor of Rhodia and Clarefontaine products.


The website below will enable you to find where to buy the products online and at a store near you .

http://www.exaclair.com/purchase.shtml


Both products work wonderfully with fountain pens, as they are produced in France and French student still write most of their notes and have to take their exams with pens.
Fountain pens with erasable blue ink is the instrument of choice in all Humanities exams while pencils are king for Science students.

A cheaper alternative is the use of printer paper, modified with the help of the D.I.Y website templates for Classic size organizers.

DQBunny
12-04-2009, 12:42 PM
Both products work wonderfully with fountain pens, as they are produced in France and French student still write most of their notes and have to take their exams with pens.

You know, since good notebooks and fountain pens go hand in hand, where can one get a good, inexpensive fountain pen these days? I dearly miss writing with one and used to pick up a cheap one when I was in high school and wrote with it all the time. Now I can't seem to find them any longer.

gmanedit
12-04-2009, 02:12 PM
ex, since you're a DIY type, why not make your own monkey fists? http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en-us&q=monkey+fist+knot&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

Post photos.

ex machina
12-04-2009, 08:52 PM
ex, since you're a DIY type, why not make your own monkey fists? http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en-us&q=monkey+fist+knot&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

Post photos.

I really like the Red Oxx ones. Also, the Red Oxx monkey fists have a loop that emanates on both ends from the fist. I have been considering for a spell taking one apart to learn how they are tied. If I can find a cord/rope similar to what my Red Oxx monkey fists are made with, I think I will give it a try. But I will need that cord, as it's a total package item: the knot, the loop, the material. I won't wreck one without a shot at making more than one of comparable quality.

Thanks for the list of videos. I looked at a couple and I see that a couple of fellas use ball bearings in the fist. I just looked it up, and the fists are made from American Parachute Cord. Now I just have to figure which of the six types it is, and then get some. I see American Parachute Cord is available on the web, particularly 550 cord. I sense another project brewing! :P

backpack
12-05-2009, 02:14 AM
You know, since good notebooks and fountain pens go hand in hand, where can one get a good, inexpensive fountain pen these days? I dearly miss writing with one and used to pick up a cheap one when I was in high school and wrote with it all the time. Now I can't seem to find them any longer.

There is a fountain pen shop in Scottsdale, below is their link to the Lamy Safari, a very sturdy fountain pen available in an array of color and not very expensive around $30. I have several Safaris and this is the fountain pen I would recommend as a starter pen.
http://www.scottsdalepen.com/lamy-pens-safari-c-139_141.html


If you want to find something cheaper, to feel your way back to fountain pen, go to your local Office Depot and find the cheap Yafa fountain pen, in a blister pack, usually next to refillable ballpoints like the Parker Jotter.
Office Depot also has Cross fountain pens.


Staples has my number 2 fountain pen of choice, the Waterman Phileas.
I have multiple of them and I like them a lot. They are also around $24-30 depending on the store.
They may have a sale, right now.


If you want really really cheap starter pens at Yafa fountain pen price, your only other option is an internet seller.


Got to the fountain pen forum at http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/
Sign up and ask a lot of questions about cheap, starter fountain pens in the writing instrument sub forum.


The Lamy Safari and Watermam Phileas are my personal favorites but I know that there are cheaper fountain pens available.

PM4HIRE
12-05-2009, 06:44 PM
I think I'm going to order a Lamy Safari ballpoint!!!

ex machina
12-05-2009, 07:30 PM
For you fountain pen aficionados, here's a web site that may make all the difference: mikeitwork.com (http://mikeitwork.com).

backpack
12-05-2009, 08:32 PM
I think I'm going to order a Lamy Safari ballpoint!!!

You won't be disappointed. I have had mine, which I bought with the matching fountain pen, rollerball and pencil, for at least 10 years, it has been used every month ever since to write my rent check and addressing my correspondence.

I am still using the original refill.


I found Lamy's to be equivalent in the writing instrument area to what Tom Bihn does for bags.

The Safari is the Cafe Bag/Synapse/Imago of the line, everyday use and nice looking. (Safari colors match Tom Bihn's and there is even a clear version to match with everything)

The Studio, also from Lamy, is more like the Tristar or the Checkpoint Flyer.
It is a steel pen which is available in many colors, it looks extremely professional.

ex machina
12-05-2009, 10:23 PM
I use a Retro51 with a Schmidt Esay Flow 9000 refill. I like it. But, all this talk of fountain pens, and a look at the mikeitwork.com fine tuning options really are piquing my interest in fountain pens, which I dismissed 30 years ago as too messy, and far to much of a hassle. I suspect that the technology has improved. How are these Lamy fountain pens refilled? Do they leak? I'd like to hear from fans of the fountain pen as to why they like them, and how well they work.

I am ever-questing for the perfect writing instrument and paper medium. My suspicion is others here are as well. ;)

Jenne
12-06-2009, 01:11 AM
I just got my first Lamy, a Signature from http://www.jetpens.com and filled it with Noodler's Purple Martin ink (my signature might give away that I am a fan of purple.) I really like that pen! (I use a converter.)

For cheaper fountain pens, I love my Pilot Prera and Ohto Fine from http://www.jstationery.com . I'm a big fan of Japanese medium nibs, which are close to Fine for me. (These two only use cartridges.)

ex machina, I have a Retro 51 Tornado and I have a hard time getting it to flow well. Do you have any tips? I just put an Ohto cartridge in and I'm hoping to have success.

ex machina
12-06-2009, 01:45 AM
ex machina, I have a Retro 51 Tornado and I have a hard time getting it to flow well. Do you have any tips? I just put an Ohto cartridge in and I'm hoping to have success.

Hi Jenne,
My Tornados are not fountain pens. I use the Schmidt Easy Flow 9000 M ink. I find it works well, responds to either a light or heavy hand, flow is excellent, and it doesn't leak. I think it is a thixotropic ink but not as 'dry' as Fisher. I find it to be more fluid. I am happy with it, and the best price I found was on eBay. I ordered a bunch there at a price of under 2.50 each when all was said and done.

If your Tornado is a fountain pen, I have no suggestions for ink as I would be out of my element. I am just beginning to look at fountain pens again after 30 years. I don't even own one at present. My interest was renewed by seeing that many people are interested in and using them. I don't think there would be this level of interest if the problems I had in the past are still prevalent. I think I will have to visit a fine pen store to really evaluate the possibility of using a fountain again. However, I will continue using my Tornados with Schmidt ink for daily use (until I discover something better. ;)

gmanedit
12-06-2009, 10:35 AM
Hi, ex. Years ago I switched from fountain pens to capless rollerballs. I like a pen you can use one-handed—something where you don't need two hands to take the cap off. I bought a Jorg Hysek (http://penopoly.com/?cat=66; heavy; fat barrel; beautiful but expensive, but it made a great impression at meetings) and a Lamy (http://www.pencity.com/cgi-bin/SoftCart.exe/Lamy/SwiftRollerball.htm?E+scstore). The Lamy is neat: When you push in the thingie on top to bring out the point, the clip retracts into the barrel.

Fountain pen history: Parker from college (I still have it), older model Namiki Vanishing Point (for the one-handed operation, plus the point is up when you carry it, so it doesn't leak), and a glass dip pen (something like this: http://www.jetpens.com/product_info.php/products_id/3781), an impulse purchase at a going-out-of-business sale. Surprisingly (to me), the dip pen works fine, with regular fountain pen ink; it's a real pen.

The Penopoly site says fountain pens are cheaper to use (bottled ink versus rollerball refills). Maybe I'll end up going back to the Namiki. I still prefer the convenience of rollerballs.

backpack
12-06-2009, 01:56 PM
I just got my first Lamy, a Signature from http://www.jetpens.com and filled it with Noodler's Purple Martin ink (my signature might give away that I am a fan of purple.) I really like that pen! (I use a converter.)

For cheaper fountain pens, I love my Pilot Prera and Ohto Fine from http://www.jstationery.com . I'm a big fan of Japanese medium nibs, which are close to Fine for me. (These two only use cartridges.)

ex machina, I have a Retro 51 Tornado and I have a hard time getting it to flow well. Do you have any tips? I just put an Ohto cartridge in and I'm hoping to have success.


I am still using fountain pens and I recommend the fountainpennetwork site if what I suggest doesn't resolve the problem.


The best flowing ink is Waterman Florida Blue, if you could buy a bottle and
a converter for your pen, it will most likely flow well.

Then switch to smooth paper, the best are Clarefontaine and Rhodia but HP 32lb laserjet paper is more economical if you are doing massive amount of writing. I use 100% recycled printer paper.

Depending on the type of paper you are using, there might be tiny pieces of fiber stuck between the tines of the nib causing flow difficulties. Check with a loupe.


Feel free to ask me more questions.

PM4HIRE
12-06-2009, 07:49 PM
Backpack:

Does the Lamy Safari ballpoint have the longest write out?

That's my assumption in buying a ballpoint! Also, fewer hassles. There appears to be an entire subculture of people that are into pens.;)

backpack
12-06-2009, 08:57 PM
Backpack:

Does the Lamy Safari ballpoint have the longest write out?

That's my assumption in buying a ballpoint! Also, fewer hassles. There appears to be an entire subculture of people that are into pens.;)


I bought the ballpoint at least 10 years ago, it has been used every month ever since to write my rent check and addressing my correspondence.

I am still using the original refill on the Lamy.


My family used and probably still uses Parker Jotters, the refill is long lasting.
The pen is too thin for me.

My husband's Tornado ballpoint, which was a gift, the original refill stopped working this year after a little more than a couple of years of infrequent use.

I don't know about other brands, prior to using my Lamy ballpoint, I just used give away promotional pens.


All Lamy pens and especially the Safari ballpoints are extremely comfortable.

DQBunny
12-06-2009, 10:47 PM
backpack, I saw Scottsdale Pen's site right after I made the last post. Thanks, everyone, for chiming in! I think I will go pick out a Lamy for myself after I get paid this week. ^_^

Just
12-07-2009, 12:39 AM
My family used and probably still uses Parker Jotters, the refill is long lasting.
The pen is too thin for me.

I LOVE Parker Jotters, but they are hard to come by in my local brick-and-mortar shops (and expensive unless they're at the PX/NEX etc.)

They aren't too thin for me... If they are too thin for you, I'm having a ball imagining you with one of those tiny Cross pens :D

Fountain pens... I'm loving the discussion here since my (very few) experiences with any of those have been disastrous! :rolleyes:

PM4HIRE
12-07-2009, 08:18 AM
Back when I worked in the aerospace industry, I often gave away Cross pens to customers. The customer would be sitting across the table from me and make a remark about my Cross pen, then I'd simply hand them the Cross pen to keep.

This worked well in the contract negotiation process.:)

PM4HIRE
12-07-2009, 08:32 AM
Just:

You can find Parker Jotters (http://www.amazon.com/Parker-Jotter-Stainless-Medium-PAR13333/dp/B001603YXI/ref=cm_cr_pr_sims_t) here!

Just
12-07-2009, 02:31 PM
Just:

You can find Parker Jotters (http://www.amazon.com/Parker-Jotter-Stainless-Medium-PAR13333/dp/B001603YXI/ref=cm_cr_pr_sims_t) here!

Yup, pricey! Especially given how often they lose themselves/get absconded with...

But thanks :)

I'm actually looking pretty closely at those 10 packs listed on the site...

backpack
12-07-2009, 03:32 PM
I LOVE Parker Jotters, but they are hard to come by in my local brick-and-mortar shops (and expensive unless they're at the PX/NEX etc.)

They aren't too thin for me... If they are too thin for you, I'm having a ball imagining you with one of those tiny Cross pens :D

Fountain pens... I'm loving the discussion here since my (very few) experiences with any of those have been disastrous! :rolleyes:


I saw Parker Jotter at Office Depot, in blister packs so they shouldn't be that expensive.

My husband was given a Cross ballpoint, the thin one. I couldn't even graps it for more than a second, forget writing with it! :eek:


However, I love fountains pens but not all of them. That is the really important point.

When starting with fountain pens, I believe new users would be better off choosing a cartridge/converter school fountain pen, one made in Europe or Japan for school students.

Then go from there.

If you like steel fountain pens, try a Cross, Parker or Waterman available at Office (something) and Staples.
They sell the cartridges that fit the pens. Those 3 brands have proprietary cartridges.

Office Depot also has Yaffa fountain pens, really cheap in a blister pack with some international cartridge in various colors.

Pen that take international cartridges can be used with many ink cartridges including Herbin and Pelikan.


Next, you can buy a converter for your pen, essentially a refillable cartridge and use bottled ink made in a dazzling array of colors.

You will eventually buy more fountain pens to contain the ink colors you like the best.


Modern converter/cartridge or c/c pens do not leak unless you take them on a no gravity ride and back in a few second or they have a crack if they fall on concrete.

Plastic school pens or steel pens are very very very strong.

The CEO of Levenger boasted that he drove his big SUV on top of a plastic Lamy Safari and the pen had barely a scratch.


I am not in the habit of driving on top of my pens but... school fountain pens have to be pretty strong and they are mandatory in France if not in the whole E.U.

If they leaked and damaged homework or pen cases, the companies would no longer be in business.

DQBunny
12-08-2009, 03:48 PM
I just treated myself to a blue Lamy Safari from Scottsdale Pen. The store is so very nice and I love the pen's feel and writing flow. I told the owner about Tom Bihn, saying the pen and store were recommended from this thread and he was honestly interested. I had my small cafe bag with me and showed him my various pouches and the quality of the product. He was impressed!

DQBunny
12-10-2009, 11:08 PM
I've replied before on this thread, but now I am trying out an alternative to the Moleskine. I wanted something I could be "sure" about (on labor issues and such,) so I'm trying out Barnes and Noble's new Ecosystem (http://www.ecosystemlife.com/) notebooks.

I'm trying out the Ecosystem as well based on this thread and I'm finding I like them a LOT better than my Moleskine. I grabbed a pack of the essay books and the quality is just phoenomenal. My fountain pen does not bleed through the paper at all and I'm using the standard Lamy refills. They've definitely acquired a permanent customer from me!

PM4HIRE
12-11-2009, 12:46 PM
Got my yellow Lamy Safari ballpoint this morning and the pen made a fine addition to my small TB Cafe bag!!!

Archangelo
02-10-2011, 10:02 PM
I prefer plain. Especially the Moleskine City Notebooks that have all of those extra features. I highly recommend them for anyone traveling to a major city. I have used the Berlin, Prague, Vienna, and Munich editions. The plain pages are for journaling, but it also has maps, tabbed organizer, itinerary pages, and conversion charts. I hope this helps.

jostber
02-12-2011, 11:53 AM
I'm trying out the Ecosystem as well based on this thread and I'm finding I like them a LOT better than my Moleskine. I grabbed a pack of the essay books and the quality is just phoenomenal. My fountain pen does not bleed through the paper at all and I'm using the standard Lamy refills. They've definitely acquired a permanent customer from me!

I have come there from Moleskine as well, now love the Ecosystem notebooks. They are wonderful to use regarding quality for writing, and they are very sturdy and durable. It also good to know they're all produced in the US from sustainable sources.

Fat Crip
02-13-2011, 01:47 PM
I too have had a couple of Lamy Safaris, and they are great. I use them for different colours, but my main, everyday pen is a Montblanc Meisterstuck - the big chunky one with a double broad nib. One pen, used everyday, becomes part of you, so I really only use the one with Montblanc Blue/Black ink. One of the Lamy's has red ink.

I also have the ball pen and pencil to match.

I've used these for over 20 years and in that time I managed to, one, stop losing them, and, two, stop people pinching them! When you have a £10 pen you don't worry much about losing it or someone pocketing it. However, when you have a £300 pen ($450), you tend to keep an eye on it, and always make sure you get it back. The ball point is worse because I often hand it to a client to sign a contract, and frequently it goes straight in their pocket. If its just a £5-10 pen and you're charging a £1,000 fee you just let it go, but a £150 ball pen you've had for 20+ years? You ask for it back!

Eric

Maria
02-13-2011, 03:09 PM
Oh pens and papers - and bags (of course!) - my favourites!

I used to use the Moleskin pocket lined book, but switched to Leuchtturm1917 - much better paper, fountain pen friendly, and they are cheaper than Moleskin too! They have a wonderful selection of products, and you can buy a matching pen loop for the side of the notebooks. Plus they come in a variety of fun colours.

http://www.leuchtturm1917.com/

Rhodia is dreamy - lovely silky smooth paper. But I found the paper in their "Moleskin style" book is a little different from their writing pads - not as nice. I find myself buying the Rhodia pads and leaving them all over the house, and to give away to people - they must try this paper!

Yesterday, I was in my favourite pen and paper store (Laywine's in Toronto - they are so professional and know their stuff!), carrying my black Co Pilot. The owner of the store recognized the Tom Bihn label and we were chatting Tom Bihn quality. I was all set to dump out the contents on the counter to show the staff and other customers what I could hold in it - but I don't know if they would have all appreciated such...especially as the counter had a selection of pens, inks, and papers and I didn't want to take over.

Anyway, I was at the fountain pen counter. I am in the market for a new pen, and was debating between a particular Caran D'Ach (I do like their ball point pens), and a Graf von Faber-Castell...until I tried a Sailor Professional Gear pen. Well, that did it. I will be getting one...now to decide what style casing. (Gosh, it's like trying to decide what colour Tom Bign to choose!)

The Sailor nib was so smooth, and made such a difference for my small tight hand writing. I would have been perfectly happy with the plain black style - just had to decide gold or rhodium details. But on the Sailor website - they show a MOSAIC in black / grey, and an EBONITE MARBLE. Okay, I think these are the same pens - at least technically - and there is a large price difference, but I don't want to shell out this kind of money for something and yet fear I will say over time "I wish I had waited and saved up and bought the casing I preferred..."

Any advice would be appreciated!

In case anyone is interested in Sailor pens - here is a link:

http://www.sailor.co.jp/EXPORT/professional_g/index.html

blackfungi
02-13-2011, 03:09 PM
I use the Moleskine Volant Pocket size, lined for my journal. Cheapest place for me to buy them for delivery to Australia is through <a href="http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/">The Book Depository</a>.

I came across Guildhall notebooks via <a href="http://blackcover.net/?p=36#more-36">Black Cover</a> and purchased them on the <a href="http://www.ukge.co.uk/UK/guildhall.asp">UK Geologists Equipment</a> website. Ink takes a little longer to dry on the paper compared to Moleskine, but the notebook itself is lovely.

O-Check Design Graphics is another brand that has lovely paper. It's Korean and I get through <a href="http://notemaker.com.au/">Notemaker</a> in Australia.

Finally, I use Uniball Signo 207 pens, but with the 5mm refills. The ink flows nicely and the thin tip makes my poor handwriting look a little neater!



[Yes, I have thought about my carbon footprint. I've also thought about the many jobs my international purchases help support across the globe.]

it's in fact free worldwide shipping on everything over at the book depository.

http://www.bookdepository.com/search?searchTerm=moleskine&search=search

eWalker
05-28-2014, 06:29 AM
6417

Squared Evernote Moleskine and Green Post its!

Perfect to color coordinate with my black Dyneema/Wasabi Co-Pilot! :cool:

scribe
05-28-2014, 10:19 PM
Ooh, a thread on pens and paper!

I use a selection of Moleskines (standard, pocket, Evernote, and the tiny ones that fit in a SE inner pocket) but also Paperblanks - and of course now my FJN :)

I much prefer fountain pens, and I don't get any significant bleed-through* on Moleskine paper - it's nowhere near as bad as the Day-Timer paper than I bought for my FJN (the TB paper doesn't bleed either, but is expensive). Maybe it's the ink? I generally use Parker pens with their own brand of cartridges - I love the idea of bottled ink, but a fill-up never lasts as long as a cartridge and I'm always worried I'll run out in the middle of writing something and lose the flow.

* As in, I can see that there's writing on the other side of the page, but there are no actual spots of ink coming through

@eWalker - if there was an aubergine/wasabi Co-Pilot, it would be in my shopping cart faster than you can say "Jack Robinson"! As it is, I shall wait for my Steel/UV Pilot (on backorder), though it won't coordinate so nicely with my Evernote notebooks. I knew there was a reason I was thinking of getting the black/wasabi one instead... *sigh*

Vecturist
05-29-2014, 08:54 AM
I discovered muji notebooks a few years ago - nice and simple, although they don't have as hard a cover as moleskin do and I have to remember which specific ones I like best since they come in a huge variety of sizes and qualities of paper.

eWalker
05-29-2014, 10:46 AM
Ooh, a thread on pens and paper!

I use a selection of Moleskines (standard, pocket, Evernote, and the tiny ones that fit in a SE inner pocket) but also Paperblanks - and of course now my FJN :)

I much prefer fountain pens, and I don't get any significant bleed-through* on Moleskine paper - it's nowhere near as bad as the Day-Timer paper than I bought for my FJN (the TB paper doesn't bleed either, but is expensive). Maybe it's the ink? I generally use Parker pens with their own brand of cartridges - I love the idea of bottled ink, but a fill-up never lasts as long as a cartridge and I'm always worried I'll run out in the middle of writing something and lose the flow.

* As in, I can see that there's writing on the other side of the page, but there are no actual spots of ink coming through

@eWalker - if there was an aubergine/wasabi Co-Pilot, it would be in my shopping cart faster than you can say "Jack Robinson"! As it is, I shall wait for my Steel/UV Pilot (on backorder), though it won't coordinate so nicely with my Evernote notebooks. I knew there was a reason I was thinking of getting the black/wasabi one instead... *sigh*

I am trying very hard to use as less paper as I can, but I just love books and take great pleasure in writing old style.

To be able to let go my library and my fathers library I kept my old journals. Those are hand made using traditional book binding techniques by a very talented artisan. The last I had made is big as medieval book and I use it to register my life milestones.

When I receive my first order bought directly from TB, it is going to be registered on it as the first step of a new journey.

I agree 100% with you that aubergine/wasabi Co-Pilot would be stunning! I keep looking at Forums pictures and I keep thinking how great looking they are on their various color combos! :)

I choose my basic color combo as Black/steel for my travel set because that was the easiest to coordinate. And Wasabi was the only color available for all the accessories I wanted (at the time I ordered)!

Besides that looking every day at Evernote logo, Android interface, and others, made that color combo very familiar! :)

Over time I plan to add more color diversity to the bags Itself starting with the Aeronaut 30! ;)

scribe
05-29-2014, 01:32 PM
I am trying very hard to use as less paper as I can, but I just love books and take great pleasure in writing old style.

An author friend of mine calls pens "thinking sticks", because it's much easier to "think aloud" in longhand than on a computer - at least for my generation, who learnt to write with a pen long, long before they got anywhere near a keyboard. As with the French cited earlier in this thread, when I was at school we had to do all our homework with a fountain pen - ballpoints were strictly for rough notes.

The way I look at it, I may have a whole heap of notebooks but that's peanuts compared to all the magazines and newspapers that most people still consume. Now, if only I could stop the flow of junk mail that still comes through my letter-box...