PDA

View Full Version : fun time flying with air canada!



maverick
08-30-2009, 12:21 PM
we had the most fun flying experience with air canada yesterday!

we took the 6am flight from washington, dc to toronto. we got to the airport at 5:30. there was no line to check in - the air canada check in desk hardly ever has two or three people waiting to get checked in, anyway. they had closed the flight, but the person at the desk opened the flight so we could check in without me asking and just reminded us to get there early in the future.

after we checked in, we went down stairs to go through security. dca is such a nice airport to go in and out of. there were just a couple of people ahead of us to go through security. even at more normal times, there is hardly any line at security at dca, and it moves fast.

we waited a just a few minutes at the gate before we boarded.

my son ensures we get to board early - privileges of traveling with a munchkin :).

as soon as we boarded, the flight attendant asked what my son would like, and he asked for apple juice, saying please without being reminded :). the flight attendant brought us apple juice and cookies while we waited for everyone to board.

then she brought him complimentary ear phones (though we had our own). they normally charge a fee for these - it was very sweet of them!

then, as we deplaned, they asked if we would like to come and see the cockpit. my son was a little shy at first, but was very excited to be there once the shyness passed.

we left my wife waiting for us outside for a bit, but it was quite an experience!

the crew aboard our air canada flight was quite exceptional! i remember back in the 1980s when you flew as a kid and got to go up to the cockpit. i know that security concerns are responsible for many of the changes. they gave you some games to keep you entertained. i even remember getting a pin with wings. i thought it was the coolest thing! yesterday's experience brought back many memories. it was really nice to see this crew extend this special treatment to my son!

maverick
08-30-2009, 12:34 PM
i should also mention that i found out something interesting with regard to plane side check in of handbags on my way back.

because my wife's family in toronto had an extra car seat that my son could use, i brought his car seat back with me so that my wife would not have to manage bringing it back.

i was able to do a plane side check in of the car seat rather than checking it in when i checked in.

however, i didn't get it back when we deplaned. instead, all luggage that was checked in plane side arrived on the baggage claim carousel just like the regularly checked luggage.

i should also mention that more recently, more airlines are asking passengers who have roll aboard suitcases to check them in plane side rather than bringing them onboard and storing them in the overhead bins.

so if you select a roll aboard suitcase as your carry on, you're more likely to end up having to wait at the baggage claim carousel for your luggage.

this is yet another great reason to choose bags like the aeronaut (http://www.tombihn.com/page/001/PROD/500/TB0906), tri-star (http://www.tombihn.com/page/001/PROD/500/TB0940) and western flyer (http://www.tombihn.com/page/001/PROD/500/TB0950) that you know you will be able to bring onboard, whether you're flying a small regional jet or a big jumbo 747 or something in between.

scotlib
08-30-2009, 04:23 PM
Hi maverick,

Cute pictures! Kudos to Air Canada for the sparkle in your munchkin's eyes! Have you started his flying school fund, yet? You'll probably need one after this :-)

Cheers!

maverick
08-30-2009, 05:50 PM
Have you started his flying school fund, yet? You'll probably need one after this :-)

Cheers!

hi scotlib,

it's funny you should mention that... i don't know how, but my son and i got into a conversation recently about the fact that you drive a car, but you pilot a plane. that led somehow into the fact that in order to become a pilot, you have to take flying lessons. so every so often, on the way to camp (which is at his montessori, so we say we're going to "school" rather than going to "camp"), he'll ask if the pilots are going to school right now, also.

it would be very cool to learn how to fly. if he wants to learn, i'll definitely encourage it - and may even join him! :)

maverick
08-31-2009, 04:37 PM
so, i did a bit of reading and made a phone call this evening... on thursday morning, i'm going to do an introductory flight in a cessna C-172S (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cessna_172) at aviation adventures (http://www.aviationadventures.com/) at leesburg municipal airport (http://www.flyvirginia.com/airport/jyo) in leesburg, va. this is a two hour session, which includes one hour of introduction and review on the ground, and one hour of flight time where i will get to fly at least 90% of the time. i am really excited about the opportunity!

MsMoon
08-31-2009, 05:58 PM
Wow, Maverick! That's awesome!! Have a great time!

I love the pictures! Those will be keepsakes for sure.

Heidi Jill
08-31-2009, 07:12 PM
Good for you, Maverick! I was one solo cross country away from getting my private pilot license, about 10 years ago. My hubs has his, and we spent many happy years flying around for fun in our Piper Archer. That's all in the past now, but we enjoyed every minute!

maverick
08-31-2009, 07:23 PM
Good for you, Maverick! I was one solo cross country away from getting my private pilot license, about 10 years ago. My hubs has his, and we spent many happy years flying around for fun in our Piper Archer. That's all in the past now, but we enjoyed every minute!

hi heidi jill,

that sounds so wonderful! thank you for sharing :)

Frank II
08-31-2009, 07:34 PM
I learned to fly in 172's. Lots of fun....you're in for an experience.

genie1985
09-03-2009, 06:59 AM
we had the most fun flying experience with air canada yesterday!

we took the 6am flight from washington, dc to toronto. we got to the airport at 5:30. there was no line to check in - the air canada check in desk hardly ever has two or three people waiting to get checked in, anyway. they had closed the flight, but the person at the desk opened the flight so we could check in without me asking and just reminded us to get there early in the future.

after we checked in, we went down stairs to go through security. dca is such a nice airport to go in and out of. there were just a couple of people ahead of us to go through security. even at more normal times, there is hardly any line at security at dca, and it moves fast.

we waited a just a few minutes at the gate before we boarded.

my son ensures we get to board early - privileges of traveling with a munchkin :).

as soon as we boarded, the flight attendant asked what my son would like, and he asked for apple juice, saying please without being reminded :). the flight attendant brought us apple juice and cookies while we waited for everyone to board.

then she brought him complimentary ear phones (though we had our own). they normally charge a fee for these - it was very sweet of them!

then, as we deplaned, they asked if we would like to come and see the cockpit. my son was a little shy at first, but was very excited to be there once the shyness passed.

we left my wife waiting for us outside for a bit, but it was quite an experience!

the crew aboard our air canada flight was quite exceptional! i remember back in the 1980s when you flew as a kid and got to go up to the cockpit. i know that security concerns are responsible for many of the changes. they gave you some games to keep you entertained. i even remember getting a pin with wings. i thought it was the coolest thing! yesterday's experience brought back many memories. it was really nice to see this crew extend this special treatment to my son!

I am really envy you!

maverick
09-03-2009, 08:06 AM
so, i did a bit of reading and made a phone call this evening... on thursday morning, i'm going to do an introductory flight in a cessna C-172S (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cessna_172) at aviation adventures (http://www.aviationadventures.com/) at leesburg municipal airport (http://www.flyvirginia.com/airport/jyo) in leesburg, va. this is a two hour session, which includes one hour of introduction and review on the ground, and one hour of flight time where i will get to fly at least 90% of the time. i am really excited about the opportunity!

well, i flew for the first time! and i was wrong - you don't get to fly 90% of the time! i got to fly the entire time with the exception of the few moments i took to get a couple of pictures while up in the sky.

it was absolutely amazing! if you haven't done it, i highly recommend it!

everything went very smoothly. i did very well (this is according to my instructor). he helped me with the landing, but i did everything else. i was amazed at how quickly we were airborne - a bit different than flying a commercial jet.

it's funny - i feel very light as i sit here typing this.

i got the paperwork for enrolling in flight school, and this flight counts towards that time. my wife is thinking this over - she's concerned that it isn't safe. though, it's much safer than driving, and we do that every day :).

they offer the cessna computer based training where you do a lesson on the computer, followed by a lab on the computer, followed by a flying lesson.

i've attached a couple of pictures...

GaryS
09-03-2009, 08:47 AM
I am really envy you!

I envy his son! :D

maverick
09-03-2009, 08:51 AM
I envy his son! :D

yeah - you know, his cockpit had far more gadgetry compared to mine :). i don't have a picture of the cockpit, but i do have it in a video that i can post later this evening.

KarlJ
09-03-2009, 11:38 AM
Oh, great for you, Mav! I trained in 172's back in the early eighties out of KSMO (Santa Monica, CA).

Those first ten or so hours are a blast! Then the next ten or so right after the solo. Aw heck, it's all a blast!

Congrats, and have a great time! :D

maverick
09-03-2009, 11:40 AM
Oh, great for you, Mav! I trained in 172's back in the early eighties out of KSMO (Santa Monica, CA).

Those first ten or so hours are a blast! Then the next ten or so right after the solo. Aw heck, it's all a blast!

Congrats, and have a great time! :D

thanks karl!

i'm excited we have so many pilots on the forum!

Frank II
09-03-2009, 01:08 PM
I learned on 152's and 172's in Gainesville, Florida in 1980. Twelve years later I'm at SMO and see one of the planes I learned to fly in. My flight school had gone out of business and it was sold to a guy living in L.A. Small world.

maverick
09-03-2009, 01:13 PM
I learned on 152's and 172's in Gainesville, Florida in 1980. Twelve years later I'm at SMO and see one of the planes I learned to fly in. My flight school had gone out of business and it was sold to a guy living in L.A. Small world.

wow! small world, indeed!

KarlJ
09-03-2009, 01:16 PM
Really? What school? I was at Claire Walters.

Frank II
09-03-2009, 01:25 PM
I was living near SMO at the time and was at American Flyers at SMO checking out Instrument training.

Heidi Jill
09-03-2009, 04:19 PM
Whee!!! I'm so happy for you - nothing like that first flight! You have a pretty area for flying. We never flew into Leesburg, but we did fly down to Williamsburg a couple of times (from central NJ). Be meticulous with your pre-flight check on the airplane, learn as much as you can about how the mechanics of the airplane (so you will be able to spot potential problems), keep your head screwed on straight and you will be fine! ;-)

Just wait until your first solo! A combination of being extremely happy, excited, and wondering if taking off was the dumbest thing you've ever done! They say that your first solo landing will be one of the best landings you ever make.

Hubs and I learned in a Piper Warrior. I sat in the back seat on almost all his flights (maybe you can get your wife to do that if you are flying a 4 seater). We then bought a used Piper Archer (4 seats, 180HP). I also trained in a Cessna 152.

How long is the runway at Leesburg?

maverick
09-03-2009, 07:59 PM
Whee!!! I'm so happy for you - nothing like that first flight! You have a pretty area for flying. We never flew into Leesburg, but we did fly down to Williamsburg a couple of times (from central NJ). Be meticulous with your pre-flight check on the airplane, learn as much as you can about how the mechanics of the airplane (so you will be able to spot potential problems), keep your head screwed on straight and you will be fine! ;-)

Just wait until your first solo! A combination of being extremely happy, excited, and wondering if taking off was the dumbest thing you've ever done! They say that your first solo landing will be one of the best landings you ever make.

Hubs and I learned in a Piper Warrior. I sat in the back seat on almost all his flights (maybe you can get your wife to do that if you are flying a 4 seater). We then bought a used Piper Archer (4 seats, 180HP). I also trained in a Cessna 152.

How long is the runway at Leesburg?

thanks heidi jill!

it was just beautiful up there this morning!

i'm not scared of taking off. the landing is just a bit intimidating. :D

they have a piper arrow iii and a diamond eclipse at aviation adventures that i'd like to try also. i think it'd like to get completely comfortable with the cessna 172s before i try other airplanes, though.

the runway is about 5500 feet at leesburg.

can i bring a passenger along while i'm a student flying with an instructor? i know i can't take a passenger on a solo flight until i have a private pilot's license.

thanks!

KarlJ
09-03-2009, 11:09 PM
My instructor let my Dad come along with us on a X-C. And every now and then, depending on what we were covering at the time, another student might ride along to observe.

maverick
09-04-2009, 04:30 AM
thanks karl! that's good to know!


My instructor let my Dad come along with us on a X-C. And every now and then, depending on what we were covering at the time, another student might ride along to observe.

Frank II
09-04-2009, 05:16 AM
Before you start looking at higher performance aircraft like the Arrow, stick with the basics. It would be like someone learning to drive on a Ford Focus with an automatic suddenly taking out a Corvette with a stick. A little more complicated to drive. Once you get your ticket, then think about learning to fly the Arrow with retractable gear and variable prop.

When I was learning my school would only allow other flight students or instructors to go along on a flight lesson. They wanted you to focus on the lesson and not showing off to whoever was sitting in the back. And I'm glad. I've had a few "incidents" flying that could have turned out much worse than they did--such as me not being here. When they happened, my training kicked in and kept some bad situations from getting worse. Learning to fly means just that--not photography, not taking passengers, not worrying about bags. Concentrate on becoming a safe and competent pilot. As I was told on my first day..."There are old pilots, there are bold pilots, but there is no such thing as an old, bold pilot."

Don't get me wrong...flying is a lot of fun. But it's also serious business.

I'd also suggest joining AOPA. Yearly dues include their monthly magazine, "Flight Training." And you get a free flight bag--though not the quality of TB.

maverick
09-04-2009, 05:22 AM
Before you start looking at higher performance aircraft like the Arrow, stick with the basics. It would be like someone learning to drive on a Ford Focus with an automatic suddenly taking out a Corvette with a stick. A little more complicated to drive. Once you get your ticket, then think about learning to fly the Arrow with retractable gear and variable prop.

When I was learning my school would only allow other flight students or instructors to go along on a flight lesson. They wanted you to focus on the lesson and not showing off to whoever was sitting in the back. And I'm glad I did. I've had a few situations flying that could have turned out much worse than they did--such as me not being here. When they happened, my training kicked in and kept some bad situations from getting worse. Learning to fly means just that--not photography, not taking passengers, not worrying about bags. Concentrate on becoming a safe and competent pilot. As I was told on my first day..."There are old pilots, there are bold pilots, but there is no such thing as an old, bold pilot."

Don't get me wrong...flying is a lot of fun. But it's also serious business.

I'd also suggest joining AOPA. Yearly dues include their monthly magazine, "Flight Training." And you get a free flight bag--though not the quality of TB.

thanks fbrown627!

i'm just excited! :) i'm also a photographer and love taking pictures in most every situation. i will learn to curb these tendencies while learning to fly and focus on learning to fly.

and we're very glad that you're still around! :)

Heidi Jill
09-04-2009, 09:44 PM
That's a nice long runway~we mainly flew out of an airport with a 3,500 foot long runway, but we both did a lot of practice landings at an airport with a 6,000 foot runway.

I sat in the back for just about all of my husband's lessons and he did the same on mine. But we do just about everything together, so that wasn't odd at all for us. That was part of the reason he decided to learn in a Piper Warrior - so I could go along for the ride. Our flight instructor had no problem with that at all. Neither of us interfered in the other's training.

I'd stay away from the Arrow - it's nice to have fixed landing gear, especially when you are learning!

Frank II
09-05-2009, 02:13 PM
Now that I've looked at the new Synapse (at least on this website), i would suggest you use that as your flight bag. It should fit everything, including headset, plus when you actually go out on your own, you can put it in the front seat next to you while the backpack straps go around the sides of the back of the seat--and even the waiststrap might fit around the back of the seat--to secure it in place. This way it won't go "flying" when you get bored and decide to do a few acrobatic maneuvers while aloft. :) And everything you need will be easily accessible.

maverick
09-05-2009, 03:47 PM
Now that I've looked at the new Synapse (at least on this website), i would suggest you use that as your flight bag. It should fit everything, including headset, plus when you actually go out on your own, you can put it in the front seat next to you while the backpack straps go around the sides of the back of the seat--and even the waiststrap might fit around the back of the seat--to secure it in place. This way it won't go "flying" when you get bored and decide to do a few acrobatic maneuvers while aloft. :) And everything you need will be easily accessible.

hi fbrown627,

thanks! yes, i could dedicate the synapse for that purpose. i like the idea of the different things that i would need inflight having a specific location. that is actually why i wanted to incorporate the freudian slip into the solution.

KarlJ
09-05-2009, 07:15 PM
I can tell you that if you ask 100 pilots for bag opinions you'll get 342 unique answers. Having said that, I'll admit the Synapse looks a worthy contender. I've noticed however that backpacks don't seem to be as prevalent as opposed to an upright or rectilinear design. Just my observation... I know you'll find a solution that works of you, and who knows... you may be an innovator.

backpack
09-09-2009, 02:08 PM
Pilot student on 172's, my husband is also a student pilot and I join him in most of his flights.

I take pictures and learn a lot.

He doesn't like to ride in the back so it is just me and the instructor during my lessons.


I use the Brain Bag for flight school and the Backpack Packing Cube as a flight bag, I also bring my Small Cafe Bag in Storm/Sapphire (sky color all around and the small size forces me to pare down to the essential)

I imagine the Dyneema Synapse would be an even better fit to the flight bag requirement.

I use a Large Yarn Stuff Sack for my headphones, it is very light and Solar so that we don't forget it on the plane.


A dedicated headphone bag with the lightness and water/dirt repellent quality of Dyneema and the protection found in the Cache would be ideal.

What do you think of a product like this?
Let's call it the "Sound Absorber". (yeah, you can make fun because I know that Tom and crew will come out with a cooler and better sounding name)

It could be used not only by pilots but people who use noise canceling headphones in airplanes and in all kind of professions.
It could also protect full size precision audio headphones.

peregrina
09-12-2009, 05:19 AM
It's just so nice to finally read a positive post about Air Canada. As you may or may not know, Air Canada is the airline Canadians love to hate. My husband worked for AC for 37 years so, as you imagine, we see it differently but we have to confess we don't always mention where he works unless asked because people will always tell us a horror story about how AC lost their luggage or how AC made them miss their flight when they got to the airport 45 mins before the flight during a busy holiday... Or how they can get a better deal elsewhere...:confused:

Unfortunately, most people don't know the constraints under which airlines operate, or what part of their trip is actually dictated by airport rules or other variables. But that's besides the point and I won't turn this post into a rant :). I'm just glad that despite all the new security rules, a captain & his crew were able to still show the cockpit to a young child. It's also amazing to see the impact of such a small act of kindness. Now we have you have flying lessons and your son asking questions about how commercial pilots are trained. And a memory that he no doubt will carry with him for a very long time.