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jppreston
06-05-2014, 03:04 AM
Here is the packing list for my three month trip (I am three weeks in now). I had to plan for diverse climates and a variety of situations. I first spent a week in Iceland on my way to meet my parents for a hiking trip on the Amalfi Coast of Italy. I am now traveling by train, boat, and bus through Eastern Europe and in mid-July I head to Africa beginning in Uganda and ending in Cape Town. Finally, traveling back to the US through Brazil, Chile, and Colombia. This list is very similar to my Round the World Post but I continue to refine things a bit.

Synapse 25 - Black Dyneema / Iberian

If it doesn't fit, it doesn't go.

3 Icebreaker Marino T-shirts
2 Icebreaker Marino boxers
2 Long sleeve shirts (Wool & Price, Wrangler)
*I brought an extra LS shirt because I needed to dress a little smartly for dinner in Italy.
1 Short sleeve shirt (Icebreaker)

2 Long pants (Outlier, Prana)
1 Shorts (Patagonia)
1 Board shorts ( Patagonia)
1 Sleep shorts (Icebreaker Sonic)

2 Pair Icebreaker socks (Hike Lite Mini)
1 Bandana
1 Adidas bathing suit (boxer brief style)
1 Trucker cap
1 Columbia sun hat
1 Golite rain shell
1 Montbell U.L. down vest

1 Pair Converse slip-on tennis shoes
1 Pair Luna Mono Sandals (http://www.lunasandals.com/products/luna-mono) (awesome! - hike, run, work-out)
1 Pair Toms espadrilles (sent them home after Italy)

1 iPhone 5s (T-mobile free data and text in 100 countries)
* I don't bring a separate camera.
1 Morphie Juice-pack
1 iPad Mini
1 Battery for recharging devices (Satachi)
1 Small Bluetooth Speaker (Lon)
1 Monster Outlets to Go
1 Road Warrior Adapter
1 Bose 20i in-ear noise canceling headphones (simply the best!)

1 Klean Kanteen insulated water bottle (16 oz)
1 REI Flash 18 backpack (clothes go inside and it goes in the S25)
1 Eagle Creek Pack-It Specter compression cube set
1 RayBan folding Wayfarer sunglasses (fit perfectly, when folded, in the soft side pocket)
3 Small juggling balls (I'm learning!)

Small Toiletries Bag
Contacts Pouch
Miscellaneous Items Pouch
2 Charging cords (Apple, mini USB)
1 Small Moleskine notebook and Pens
1 Steripen (water sterilization)
1 Small headlamp

Passport (Global Entry) in TB shielded passport pouch

Everything fits comfortably in the S25 with a little extra room, which I have found is important to actually operate out of the bag on a daily basis. I typically travel wearing a T-shirt, long pants, and the Converse.

If I need special gear for hiking, camping, climbing or other sports, I try to send it ahead and pick it up where I am going to use it. I am sending a pair of hiking shoes and gaiters to meet me in Dubai because I will need them in Africa.

This is what it looks like ready to go in the pack.
65266527

Badger
06-05-2014, 04:26 AM
Your packing lists are always super detailed and I really appreciate them. My S25, with its decidedly more urban existence, admits to being more than a little jealous of your S25. And now I'm wondering if I should worry that my bags are talking to me...

At any rate, is your extra scaled-down toiletry list much different in terms of quantities than your RTW list? Or have you found that you can re-stock with the options available in your current location?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

bchaplin
06-05-2014, 06:42 AM
Very impressive! Do the clothes and shoes on that list include the ones you are wearing? Either way I think the EC compression bags can be very helpful and pair well with TB gear.

jmoz
06-05-2014, 07:42 AM
That's in impressive list. Not to derail, but does anyone know whether the EC compression cubes work well in the Tri-Star? Do they produce a bulgy bag? I love my TB packing cubes, but there are times where a bit of compression might be a positive thing.

Frank II
06-05-2014, 10:08 AM
The EC compression cubes would work very well in a Tri-Star because they tend to "flatten" down whatever is in them. They don't suck the air out like other compression bags just eliminate the extra space.

eWalker
06-05-2014, 11:21 AM
1 Pair Luna Mono Sandals (http://www.lunasandals.com/products/luna-mono) (awesome! - hike, run, work-out)


Thanks for the link. I was very curious about as I still searching for light weight sandals!

I am size 12 so any weight cut there is more then welcome!

scribe
06-05-2014, 01:29 PM
Is it just me, or would only a guy think of packing more shirts than underpants? :)

conversa
06-05-2014, 03:12 PM
Is it just me, or would only a guy think of packing more shirts than underpants? :)

*raises hand* I am of the female persuasion and I bring more shirts than undies. I just repeated my three weeks in Europe with an S19 and missed absolutely nothing, used everything and wish I could actually live like that in non-vacation life. Thank you Tom Bihn, Eagle Creek, and the one bag community.

monkeylady
06-05-2014, 04:27 PM
@conversa....packing list? Would you be willing to share?

latte828
06-05-2014, 07:53 PM
It's interesting that you use your REI Flash 18 as a packing cube/stuff sack. Do you also use your REI Flash 18 as a daypack and leave your S25 in the hotel when you arrive at your destination? The reason I ask is because I just received my new S25, and I already own an REI Stuff Travel Daypack (which I believe is similar in size and weight to the REI Flash 18). My initial thinking is to use the S25 as my main travel bag and also as my daypack. I'm trying to get some ideas. Thanks.

conversa
06-05-2014, 07:59 PM
@conversa....packing list? Would you be willing to share?

My attempt at a packing post last year was lackluster. I'll give it another try now inspired by @jppreston 's post. Maybe even a video to head off incredulity.

scribe
06-05-2014, 09:34 PM
*raises hand* I am of the female persuasion and I bring more shirts than undies.

To be fair, I usually do pack a slight majority of tops - I guess I was just a little taken aback at the thought of only 3 pairs of underpants (including the ones being worn) for such a long trip. But we may be heading into TMI territory at this point :)

monkeylady
06-05-2014, 10:51 PM
I've read plenty of blog entries (elsewhere, of course) where men packing merino wool unders comment on how they are wearable for DAYS before needing to be washed. I think to myself, "just because they don't smell, doesn't mean they're not dirty! Sheesh!"

scribe
06-05-2014, 11:45 PM
I've read plenty of blog entries (elsewhere, of course) where men packing merino wool unders comment on how they are wearable for DAYS before needing to be washed. I think to myself, "just because they don't smell, doesn't mean they're not dirty! Sheesh!"

Exactly! Ewwww....

icebeng
06-06-2014, 01:34 AM
Exactly! Ewwww....

In my defense, I pack less underwear cos I plan to wash them, they're small and easier to launder than shirts or pants. Plus they're more unobtrusive when hung up after washing. I can deal with mildly dirty outerwear, but not underwear lol

Slightly off topic: ironically, because I can stuff so much into a TB bag, I find myself less obsessive with packing light nowadays. It's not like I have trouble finding space for the extra clothing lol

jppreston
06-06-2014, 03:42 AM
Undies - wash one, wear one. Why would carrying more be better?

Everything I have can be laundered in the sink which I do every couple of days. Marino wool and the synthetics are dry within hours.

Flash 18 - I do exactly that. I use it as a daypack at my destination.

My toiletries are the same as I described at the end of This Post (http://forums.tombihn.com/packing-lists/6554-toiletries-2.html)

Yes - the list is everything I have with me - including what I am wearing.

dorayme
06-06-2014, 09:32 AM
I would think, two, or twenty two, as long as they are clean, who cares.
The concern was that some were under the impression that they were being reworn less than fresh since the high performance fabric kept odors away. I too was sqicked out by the thought of the undies not being actually clean. For others like myself who don't travel with this much discipline, thanks for clarifying. It gives me food for thought for future trips for myself.

Upon rereading, I want to clarify, I am disciplined to have clean undies. I just pack enough for each night of my trip, or plan a laundry day. I don't have the discipline to bring only one other than what I wear, and nightly wash my clothes. . .

On the upside, if everything is washed nightly, I guess you don't have the dilemma of what to do with dirty clothes so they don't contaminate the clean ones. Sounds like everything is always clean or worn. I do like that idea!

flaneuse
06-06-2014, 09:47 AM
I am also of the rule of three for travel. One for wear, one in the wash/drying, and one spare. Even with kids it works for us. It's much easier to keep track of everything when there is less.

dorayme
06-06-2014, 09:59 AM
I am also of the rule of three for travel. One for wear, one in the wash/drying, and one spare. Even with kids it works for us. It's much easier to keep track of everything when there is less.

So what does this look like wash wise? Do you wash daily to keep the ratio straight? Do you bring laundry soap? What kind do you recommend? Do you plan for daily laundry time, or just make it happen before turning in for the night? Do you launder everything in the sink, or actually find a washing machine? Maybe I have unique body chemistry, use crappy soap, or have some other failure, but I feel scuzzy when my clothes go a certain amount of time without a machine wash. I would love tips to see if this system could work for me and my family.

icebeng
06-06-2014, 10:08 AM
@jppreston
I didn't see any mention of 1st aid kits in your list, is that really unimportant?
You're learning to juggle? Would you consider busking if you got good enough? Provided it's legal to do so in the cities you visit of course :)

@everyone
I think the blogs saying high performance fabric gear being able to be worn for days without washing, could be basing that on travels through temperate countries. I can understand that, especially if they were traveling from late fall till early spring.
But no matter how high the performance of the fabric, I seriously do not advise wearing them for days in Southeast Asian countries, particularly underwear. To put it mildly, you might end up with nappy rash if you did that (it's an understatement, but I'm not going to get too graphic describing medical conditions here lol).

ETA: Not just SEA countries actually, anywhere where its hot and humid.

flaneuse
06-06-2014, 10:13 AM
For trips longer than 1 night I pack my wash kit. A ziplock bag filled with packets of woolite, a sink stopper, clothes line, clothes pins, and shout wipes. I get it all from amazon in bulk. I'll get the clothes soaking while the kids are in the bath for the night. Agitate, rinse, drain, and then hang up before bed.

If we are staying in one place for at least a week, I look for a washing machine in the air bnb listing. They usually include detergent or I can pick it up. Then I wash everything when we are down to the last set (bc if this is the case, we are staying in city where we can get emergency items or I've factored in shopping for the kids.) I love the zip off pants for my boys in the summer from REI. They wash and dry fast, and are pants and shorts in one. In the winter we usually bring 2 pairs of jeans for the adults and the older boy, then 3 pairs for the younger two (toddlers) plus cover suits (either rain or snow ones depending in weather) to try to limit the mess when they play in parks.

flaneuse
06-06-2014, 10:16 AM
I need to start including a first aid kit. I usually forget bc when we drive, we have one stashed in the car. But a set of Neosporin and band aids would be better than nothing! I usually bring adult Advil and children's in my 311 bag.

icebeng
06-06-2014, 10:21 AM
So what does this look like wash wise? Do you wash daily to keep the ratio straight? Do you bring laundry soap? What kind do you recommend? Do you plan for daily laundry time, or just make it happen before turning in for the night? Do you launder everything in the sink, or actually find a washing machine? Maybe I have unique body chemistry, use crappy soap, or have some other failure, but I feel scuzzy when my clothes go a certain amount of time without a machine wash. I would love tips to see if this system could work for me and my family.

Might it be psychological, dorayme?
The reason why I prefer not to wash larger articles of clothing while traveling is because I keep thinking there might be SOME corner I haven't scrubbed. And also because I'm not convinced I can ever do it as well as a washing machine could. (Yes I feel inferior to a washing machine :P)

jppreston
06-06-2014, 12:40 PM
Marino Wool - it really is an amazing fabric. When describing how it never smells, I am mainly discussing the shirts, which I tend to wear a day or 2 longer than the underwear before laundering (depending on climate or activity). And by he way, Marino really does deliver, even in SE Asia.

Laundry is actually super easy. I just wash my things out in the sink or shower with whatever soap happens to be at hand, wring them out, hang them up somewhere and the wool things, at least, are dry in a few hours (again depending on climate). It takes all of about 3 minutes so it's no big deal. My pants and shorts are synthetic and take a little longer to dry but I also don't wash them nearly as often. IMO, this is another advantage about traveling with fewer things and specifically with Marino wool. It is very easy to keep things clean and organized.

First Aid - for normal travel, I just keep some ibuprofen, a small amount of duct tape and a few capsules of general antibiotic (which I've never actually used). In most countries, I'm never far from a pharmacy. It goes with my theory to only pack what I actually use on a daily or weekly basis and pick up any one-time specifics when and if I need them.

As an aside, since I cut out gluten from my diet and quit drinking, I rarely (never) get sick!

Juggling - haha, I would love to get good enough to busk but at my current rate of progress that is highly unlikely in this lifetime! And the guys on the streets in Medellin, where I spend a fair amount of time, are incredible!

whisper
06-06-2014, 01:17 PM
I too love to juggle - it is great exercise, especially when learning. I am not very good at all and still enjoy it. Watching a really good juggler, like the one I saw last year in a Circque se Soliel show, is thrilling.

Great information on your list - thanks for sharing.

jppreston
06-06-2014, 01:41 PM
I mailed the extra long sleeve shirt and one pair of socks home today. ��

dorayme
06-06-2014, 07:50 PM
Might it be psychological, dorayme?
The reason why I prefer not to wash larger articles of clothing while traveling is because I keep thinking there might be SOME corner I haven't scrubbed. And also because I'm not convinced I can ever do it as well as a washing machine could. (Yes I feel inferior to a washing machine :P)

It most definitely is! That and we don't own many performance fabric articles of clothing, or regularly do extended travel, so other than to go on principle, there hasn't really been a reason to try. I am considering adding some merino basics to my wardrobe, and when I do, I think I may experiment with the sink laundering.

jppreston
06-07-2014, 07:46 AM
Something else I forgot to mention. I bring a Travelrest (http://www.amazon.com/Travelrest-Inflatable-manufacturer-Airplanes-Wheelchairs/dp/B001DYDAEK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1402148226&sr=8-1&keywords=travelrest+pillow) travel pillow. It is inflatable and is the only pillow that I've tried that really works for me. It rolls up fairly small when deflated. I used it today on the train.

6537

6538

ClaireJ
06-07-2014, 09:35 AM
Yeah I used to be the kind of person who needed to change my shirt midday on hot summer days, but discovering merino has been fantastic - I've worn the same merino tank up to, I think, five days in a row with no issues. My boyfriend, who I've also converted, could wear cotton shirts two days in a row, and now didn't have to wash any of his three (or maybe it was four?) merino shirts on a recent two week trip (and they still weren't stinky when he got back).

By the way, jppreston, your original RTW packing list is part of what inspired me to commit to using my Synapse 25 for travel, and it's been great!

flaneuse
06-08-2014, 07:57 AM
@jppreston How do you like the Morphie? What iphone do you have? The reviews on amazon are kind of mixed. I'm thinking though that this would be so handy--instant extra battery life would definitely make life easier. I'd be more inclined the hand the iphone over to my kids to play a game/watch a movie while out at a typical 3-hour-long-Euro-meal, and still have juice to access google maps ;)

jppreston
06-08-2014, 08:13 AM
How do you like the Morphie? What iphone do you have?

I have an iPhone 5s and I use it for everything - phone, camera, music, internet, etc. etc. etc. I like my phone but the battery life is terrible (as you probably know). I use the Morphie because it gives me one extra full battery charge and yet I can still put my phone in my pocket. I haven't looked at the reviews but I haven't had any problems.

flaneuse
06-08-2014, 08:17 AM
Thanks for the fast reply! Yes mine is pretty much my lifeline too. Sounds good then.

bchaplin
06-08-2014, 11:35 AM
The Juice Pack Plus is pretty good, IMO. I prefer it over the Air version. It is ugly, and makes the phone heavy, but also protects it against falls. I have dropped it more than once and the case took the hit without any damage to the phone.

reeder
06-28-2014, 04:54 PM
For trips longer than 1 night I pack my wash kit. A ziplock bag filled with packets of woolite, a sink stopper, clothes line, clothes pins, and shout wipes. I get it all from amazon in bulk. I'll get the clothes soaking while the kids are in the bath for the night. Agitate, rinse, drain, and then hang up before bed.


My wash kit also contains a clothes line, clothes pins, and shout wipes. And as odd as it sounds, I pack what Sea to Summit markets as a Kitchen Sink. It is made of ultra-sil. It takes just a bit more space than a stopper but I can fill it in the shower or sink, lift it out, and put things in there to soak for a bit while leaving sink, shower, or tub free to use. I used to use a gallon ziplock and shake but those tend to dry with a funky smell if you don't get all the moisture out. It can double as a small laundry basket but the sides don't stand up on its own.
Sea to Summit - Outdoor, Travel and Backpacking Gear (http://www.seatosummit.com/products/display/175)

There's some irony in a light weight traveler packing the kitchen sink but it works better than a sink stopper for me.

conversa
07-14-2014, 06:47 PM
thanks to Allison Levine (offtheblueprint.com), I don't think I have to feel guilty anymore for not getting around to making that video. We are basically the same person with the same petite frame, Synapse 19, packing cube and packing list (down to the same tooth powder!). And her technical skills and artistic ability far exceed my own. Yay!:cool:

nimikor
11-08-2014, 12:14 AM
Might it be psychological, dorayme?
The reason why I prefer not to wash larger articles of clothing while traveling is because I keep thinking there might be SOME corner I haven't scrubbed. And also because I'm not convinced I can ever do it as well as a washing machine could. (Yes I feel inferior to a washing machine :P)

For a great light weight portable wash solution you might want to try a Scrubba Tub (The Scrubba Wash Bag | The Scrubba Wash Bag (http://thescrubba.com/)). It works wonders and gets clothes really clean with very little effort. I have no affiliation, just a satisfied user.