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Key Troubles

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  • Ladyrixx
    replied
    I have an s-carabineer on my keys that predates getting anything from here. I tend to clip my keys to the side of my pants, or occasionally to the d-rings on my actual work bag (my Market bag is my purse, so I carry both to work) I adore the key straps to attach to pouches that are in my Market bag so I don't have to go digging if I need a pen or a band-aid.

    Otherwise, I've seen the organizers that collect your keys like a swiss-army knife. That might make hauling your keys out of your bag easier.

    Leave a comment:


  • G42
    replied
    Originally posted by bluedawg View Post
    we used to have a buzz in our household too! it was my husband's, and i never used it myself, but he really liked it.

    i think maybe part of my problem is that if i'm "out and about" i'm using one bag (e.g., a sidekick, a small cafe bag), but if i'm going to campus i'm using another (e.g, a synapse, a maker's bag). in those smaller bags, my keys just plop in and don't get "lost" (so a keystrap seems unnecessary?) -- whereas in the bigger bags, i am usually pulling my keys out of the bag as soon as i get there anyway, because if i leave my office (one million times per day, ha ha), i bring my keys along, but not my bag. so i feel like i don't get how the keystrap helps me, other than to slow me down because i have to unclip it. maybe if i didn't switch bags constantly this would seem less baffling to me.

    today i took my travel cubelet out for its debut run, and i made myself attach my keys to the keystrap in the front pocket, specifically because i outed myself in this thread as a clueless ding-dong.
    I usually carry my clump 'o keys in my front jeans pocket, but I leave one of the 8" keystraps attached to it all the time. It makes it easy to yank them out of pocket, idly swing them to offset boredom, etc. If I'm doing something strange where I think they may fall out, I can clip them to my belt loop whilst they stay in my pocket.
    When I travel or need to stow them, I clip them into whatever TB bag I'm carrying.
    I find it easier to leave the 'leash' attached to the keys for clipping/unclipping then to take the keys off of the clip. And I'm just using a double ended clip keystrap, not even one with the split ring or the o-ring.

    And you are not a clueless ding dong, everyone has their quirks - keeps the world from being boring

    Leave a comment:


  • bluedawg
    replied
    Originally posted by moriond View Post
    Hi @bluedawg,

    I never used keystraps until I got my first Tom Bihn backpack, which was the (original) Buzz Sling Backpack If you look at the Sapphire (redesigned) Buzz photo in my post, you can see the pen pockets in the front section are angled. That's because the sling format was designed to let you swing the backpack around without taking it off your shoulder and unzip the front compartment. The angle for accessing pens, etc. and the keystrap was exactly right -- all without taking the bag off your shoulder. We had forum members reporting that this design made it possible for them to use that backpack easily even when they had their leg in a cast and were hobbling around on crutches. I still have this backpack, which predates the first Synapse.
    we used to have a buzz in our household too! it was my husband's, and i never used it myself, but he really liked it.

    i think maybe part of my problem is that if i'm "out and about" i'm using one bag (e.g., a sidekick, a small cafe bag), but if i'm going to campus i'm using another (e.g, a synapse, a maker's bag). in those smaller bags, my keys just plop in and don't get "lost" (so a keystrap seems unnecessary?) -- whereas in the bigger bags, i am usually pulling my keys out of the bag as soon as i get there anyway, because if i leave my office (one million times per day, ha ha), i bring my keys along, but not my bag. so i feel like i don't get how the keystrap helps me, other than to slow me down because i have to unclip it. maybe if i didn't switch bags constantly this would seem less baffling to me.

    today i took my travel cubelet out for its debut run, and i made myself attach my keys to the keystrap in the front pocket, specifically because i outed myself in this thread as a clueless ding-dong.

    Leave a comment:


  • moriond
    replied
    Hi @synapseslouch,

    I like @Lia's solution (even down to the access maneuver, which is something I used with my original Synapse [from the first production batch when there was only the smaller size] -- see, for example, @GEOcyle's Synapse continues to surprise. thread from 2012 about accessing the side pockets). It may be easier for you to access the Synapse 19 side pocket from having the bag on your shoulder, but here's a section of the Pack Hacker video review of the Synapse 25 that shows the presenter swinging the bag across to access this side pocket (around 7:25 into the video review; I'm only posting the screen capture so you can scrub to the section of one way to access the pocket with the bag on your shoulder):
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    This is from the video review at: https://packhacker.com/travel-gear/tom-bihn/synapse-25/ . where the sequence starts around 7:25 into the clip.

    However, I'll offer some alternative suggestions/modifications that can either help organize the side pockets along the lines of her suggestion and/or help to contain your keys (along the lines of suggestions made by both @carrot and @yvandermeer) if you are looking for ways to keep your keys from tangling with other items in your pockets or main compartment and getting lost (although the cleanest solution would be an organization scheme that still lets you keep them at the end of the keystrap)

    It's most usually the side zippered pockets where you can improve the organization, and in addition to Size 1 Travel Stuff Sacks, I would most particularly recommend the Small Ghost Whale Organizer Pouches (GWOP) for recent accessory additions that are particularly good for organizing the Synapse side pockets. Here are some options for controlling your keys with small accessories:

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    These are Color Zipper Ghost Whale Organizer Pouches and a Mini Q-Kit
    Mini Spacer Mesh/Ultraviolet Zipper, Super-Mini ScrapBlack/Iberian Zipper, Mini Q-Kit Kiwi (retired color)

    Here's an overview with a few different sets of keys:
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    Closeup views:
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    Closed up with keys inside these are very flat
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    From your initial post, I wasn't sure whether you wanted to use the main compartment of the Synapse 25 for tethering your keys, but just wanted a way to keep the end of the keystrap from falling down where it couldn't be recovered. One way to solve this is to use the fact that your Synapse is filled with paper, folders, etc. but move the tether point so that you're not using the O-ring that drops your keys behind your cache. I've indicated the location of that O-ring by tethering a (retired color) 16" solar keystrap to that O-ring at the left.

    You can use the same webbing loops that are used to suspend your laptop's cache with rails to tether your keystrap. What I've done here is to hook one loop of a medium size double carabiner clip into this webbing loop.
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    At this point, you have a lot of options: you can choose to tether a regular keystrap to the double carabiner clip (either to the metal opening or to the loop itself). It may not be obvious from the picture, but if you go back to the earlier picture of the Ghost Whale pouches and Mini Q-Kit with keys, and see a Wasabi double carabiner clip, you'll see an Iberian Split-Ring keystrap with a snaphook that can slide along the Double Carabiner Clip loop. This is because the surface of the clip (a hardened material that is not plastic) is both smooth, and slightly flattened.

    So, you could tether the snaphook of a keystrap to that Double Carabiner Clip (and shift the tether position so your keys are unlikely to fall down the side of your bag where you have to grope through and disentangle them). You could lay part of the key strap over the adjacent carabiner loop, to get more control of the keystrap position. You could tether one of the Ghost Whale Organizer Pouches in the Super Mini or Mini sizes that are holding your keys directly to the Double Carabiner, or you could tether them to the end of a keystrap that ends in either an O-ring or a larger metal Split Ring that is hooked to the Double Carabiner.

    All of these variant solutions still put your keys in the main Synapse 25 compartment and out of the way of the side pockets, water bottle, and bottom pocket where you're finding insufficient room. It also makes use of the fact that your Synapse is loaded with papers to make the keys or pouches sit on top of this load.

    Here's a closeup shot of how you might tether your keys in the Mini GWOP to the Double Carabiner:
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    You also have the option of using the Ghost Whale Organizaer Pouches or Mini Q-Kit to keep your keys from sprawling and put them into a side, bottom, or center pocket. If you do want to organize the side pockets, I'd suggest the Small Ghost Whale organizer pouch is likely to be the most useful size for that pocket, since it is well shaped for the narrower side pockets and is about the size of an eyeglass case (but has 3-dimensional capability).

    You can also combine this with some kind of retracting key fob, as suggested in previous posts.

    Finally, although the Double Carabiner Clips won't be on sale separately until early next year, you can still get one of these (in Wasabi Green) free, if your order contains any Knitting Tool Pouches I've linked you to the Size 2 Knitting Tool Pouch which I use to store my computer connectors (reinforced ballistic nylon ends help here; this pouch is also good for cutlery for the same reason; it can also be used as a shorter pen/pencil pouch if you want to put an A5 notebook into an A5 size Ghost Whale Organizer Pouch).

    If you happen to order any of the new Handy Little Thing pouches, a pair of Double Carabiner Clips are included

    HTH

    moriond

    ETA:
    Originally posted by bluedawg View Post
    side note: i feel like a heretic or something; i never, ever use key straps. i don't think i understand the utility; it seems like another thing to clip and unclip all the time. i'm probably missing something obvious; it wouldn't be the first time!
    Hi @bluedawg,

    I never used keystraps until I got my first Tom Bihn backpack, which was the (original) Buzz Sling Backpack If you look at the Sapphire (redesigned) Buzz photo in my post, you can see the pen pockets in the front section are angled. That's because the sling format was designed to let you swing the backpack around without taking it off your shoulder and unzip the front compartment. The angle for accessing pens, etc. and the keystrap was exactly right -- all without taking the bag off your shoulder. We had forum members reporting that this design made it possible for them to use that backpack easily even when they had their leg in a cast and were hobbling around on crutches. I still have this backpack, which predates the first Synapse.
    Last edited by moriond; 12-09-2019, 03:39 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • synapseslouch
    replied
    Originally posted by GrussGott View Post
    My use-case is similar, although for business travel: I leave and then don't need to see my keys again until i return, but my hands are full, I have lots of stuff in pockets prone to falling out from the trip, etc, so ...

    I use the S25 left-hand side pocket with my keys attached to a retractable kevlar keychain, attached to the o-ring - this make them easy to find by only unzipping the pocket half way and since they float at the top of the pocket, other stuff sinks to the bottom and I rarely have a problem:

    [ATTACH=CONFIG]23894[/ATTACH]

    I am glad I posted here. Thank you all for the many helpful ideas!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • synapseslouch
    replied
    3.) THE MANEUVER. I drop the left shoulder strap, swing the bag horizontal across the front of my body so the right pocket is on top, so the right strap is still over my shoulder. Unzip the pocket, find the keystrap, and pull the keys out from the pocket.


    Nice! I need to work on this move.

    Leave a comment:


  • synapseslouch
    replied
    Originally posted by G42 View Post
    First off, welcome to the Forums @synapseslouch!

    I'm assuming pants pockets are out of the question? Or a retractable ring attached to a belt loop?

    Have you tried the shorter 8" key strap that came with the bag?

    Is it one key or a whole bunch of keys?
    Pants pockets do work, but I am the stereotypical absent-minded professor. Attaching my keys to my backpack reduces the number of times I misplace them. And the number of times I need to get the admin/security folks to let me in my office.

    And it is a big bunch of keys.

    Leave a comment:


  • GrussGott
    replied
    My use-case is similar, although for business travel: I leave and then don't need to see my keys again until i return, but my hands are full, I have lots of stuff in pockets prone to falling out from the trip, etc, so ...

    I use the S25 left-hand side pocket with my keys attached to a retractable kevlar keychain, attached to the o-ring - this make them easy to find by only unzipping the pocket half way and since they float at the top of the pocket, other stuff sinks to the bottom and I rarely have a problem:

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  • RosemaryOrchard
    replied
    Originally posted by bluedawg View Post
    side note: i feel like a heretic or something; i never, ever use key straps. i don't think i understand the utility; it seems like another thing to clip and unclip all the time. i'm probably missing something obvious; it wouldn't be the first time!
    I use the keystrap as a way to find my keys when they disappear behind/below something else in the pocket, and also so I can "drop" my key between doors if I'm carrying something heavy/awkward that needs both hands. (I have the door to the complex, the door to my building, and then my apartment door to contend with!)

    Leave a comment:


  • Lia
    replied
    I never unclip the keys. I keep them attached to the bag so I never lose or drop or forget them.

    Leave a comment:


  • bluedawg
    replied
    Originally posted by Lia View Post
    Also a college professor, and here's the solution I've found works for me with my S19.

    1. THE KEY SETUP. I keep my keys attached to a bright pink flowered I.D. holder (with my ID in it bc sometimes my ID is the key). This holder is my don't-leave-my-office-without-it pouch, with keys, ID, USB drive, and lip balm. It also keeps my keys from getting buried in the pocket because it's big, like 3x5.

    2.) POCKET ORGANIZATION. This keys/ID bundle is attached to the o ring in the right side pocket. This pocket is assigned to be stuff I'm likely to need in between office and classroom. So usually the only other thing I keep in this pocket is my glasses.

    3.) THE MANEUVER. I drop the left shoulder strap, swing the bag horizontal across the front of my body so the right pocket is on top, so the right strap is still over my shoulder. Unzip the pocket, find the keystrap, and pull the keys out from the pocket.
    wooooo! college professors with a synapse thread!

    i use the S19, and i do almost the exact same thing that Lia described -- my keys are always in this pocket, although not attached to anything. my phone is also in this pocket, and that's usually about it. i do the same "swing it around without taking it off" method to get my keys out when i arrive at my office.

    side note: i feel like a heretic or something; i never, ever use key straps. i don't think i understand the utility; it seems like another thing to clip and unclip all the time. i'm probably missing something obvious; it wouldn't be the first time!

    Leave a comment:


  • backpack
    replied
    I second the mini Q-Kit to keep your keys together, prevent them from scratching other things and easy retrieval due to the very smooth 1050 Ballistic fabric.

    Leave a comment:


  • yvandermeer
    replied
    Here's another "vote" for keeping your keys in one of the side pockets. I use an S19 for my EDC. Like @carrot mentioned, I use size 1 Travel Stuff Sacks for the left and right front pockets, (one in each), attached to the O-rings using black 8" key straps. My keys are on a red 16" strap, which means that I can always find the strap with my keys very quickly and yank it out. The stuff sacks prevent me from losing anything while I have a pocket open.

    As a side note: I currently also have a mini Q-Kit in the side pocket containing my keys, which I find to be a perfect size to fill the space above the stuff sack. The O-ring in that pocket looks a little cramped though with three clips attached to it, but I find the setup works very well.

    Leave a comment:


  • x3n0n
    replied
    It sounds like the two main issues with the current arrangement (O-ring on the "Cache" side of the main compartment) are that the O-ring (and thus the end of the Key Strap) is less accessible because it's so close to the Cache, and that the keys themselves get hooked on other stuff in that compartment

    If so, you might be able to reduce interference by attaching the ring to the opposite side of the main compartment. I could imagine running a split ring through one of those Cache loops at the top and clipping your s/s Key Strap to it, then dropping the keys into the elastic pocket. The layer of lining fabric should help reduce the chances of it getting stuck on things in the main part of the main compartment. I understand that it's not a good option if you've got unusually-shaped or fragile items in that elastic pocket.

    Good luck, and let us know if we can help! (And welcome to the forums!)

    Leave a comment:


  • Lia
    replied
    Also a college professor, and here's the solution I've found works for me with my S19.

    1. THE KEY SETUP. I keep my keys attached to a bright pink flowered I.D. holder (with my ID in it bc sometimes my ID is the key). This holder is my don't-leave-my-office-without-it pouch, with keys, ID, USB drive, and lip balm. It also keeps my keys from getting buried in the pocket because it's big, like 3x5.

    2.) POCKET ORGANIZATION. This keys/ID bundle is attached to the o ring in the right side pocket. This pocket is assigned to be stuff I'm likely to need in between office and classroom. So usually the only other thing I keep in this pocket is my glasses.

    3.) THE MANEUVER. I drop the left shoulder strap, swing the bag horizontal across the front of my body so the right pocket is on top, so the right strap is still over my shoulder. Unzip the pocket, find the keystrap, and pull the keys out from the pocket.

    The most important of these three combined factors is the pocket organization. When I first got the bag, I organized the contents by size -- little stuff in little pockets, big stuff in big pockets. That was not helpful. Now I organize by purpose. Nothing goes in that pocket that I'll need while teaching or when I'm sitting in my office or at a meeting. It's my transition pocket, so there isn't anything extra floating around to fall out.

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    Took me a few weeks to settle on this system, but I've been carrying it this way for over a year now, and it's the best system I've ever had

    Leave a comment:

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