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    Strap Tag End - Retainer Bands

    I'm not sure what else to call them and please tell me if the subject has come up before.
    The Challenge:
    How to tidy up the plethora of loose strap ends that invariable flap around on our luggage, after we've cinched them down tight.
    Solutions:
    Several bags I've seen lately incoporate an elasticized fabric band that has the same effect as a watchband tag ring
    Use: simply slip the excess stapping under the elastic, folding it in if necessary- to result in a tidy and unobtrusive tag end management solution.
    Caveats:
    For situations that demand constant strap adjustment, these retaining bands shouldn't be deployed. However, in other circumstances they can really tidy things up in the excess strappage department - preventing the flapping in the wind phenomenon!

    #2
    I know we used to use these things but they tended to break. I'll keep my thinking cap on for something better; the simple loop of elastic seems too low-tech, but maybe it's the best idea so far.
    Attached Files

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      #3
      Originally posted by Tom Bihn
      I know we used to use these things but they tended to break. I'll keep my thinking cap on for something better; the simple loop of elastic seems too low-tech, but maybe it's the best idea so far.
      I just tested it on one of the two tag ends created by the Imago belt strap when not in use but closed and compacted. It works beautifully. The Best part is that if you need to lengthen the strap for use around the waist, it in no way prevents the excess strapping from simply pulling through to instantly accomodate.
      One key point is to make the gap in the elasticised band as close in width to 1" so as to accomodate the 1" webbing strap with no extra room for slippage. The inherit stretchiness is what holds it all in place once the tag end is inserted.


      For some reason simple engineering can often be unimpeachable. Plus the cost of manufacture- well - almost nothing really . I'll post pix later...

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        #4
        OK. Here's the 'shell' page with pictures of the Strap Keepers. The final report will not have these pictures, they will be posted in a hidden page for your perusal only - fellow Tom Bihn forum members. I like these keepers so much I'm dusting off my sewing machine to make them for all my loose straps.
        http://www.imagometrics.com/GoBags/TB_Imago.htm

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          #5
          I just messed up my sewing machine- so I'm sending elastic webbing to my seamstress for a dozen of these strap retainers. Any chance we'll see them as standard items in the future? I'm addicted to them now.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Tom Bihn View Post
            I know we used to use these things but they tended to break. I'll keep my thinking cap on for something better; the simple loop of elastic seems too low-tech, but maybe it's the best idea so far.
            Hello Tom,

            Anything coming up for the strap keeper? I'm excited! Maybe something like this (made from excess ballistic nylon or cordura perhaps to keep it from moving plus the signature TB tags on it.. haha) to keep the excess strap.

            Because, I'll definitely get these for my BB if you made one.

            Click image for larger version

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            Last edited by syamimramli; 11-28-2015, 04:39 AM.

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              #7
              Originally posted by syamimramli View Post
              [ATTACH=CONFIG]13838[/ATTACH]
              It's like a guitar capo for strap ends.

              Comment


                #8
                Another approach - cheap and effective!

                As a musician, I use velcro cable ties to keep a whole bunch of cables secure and organized (instrument cables, microphone cables, speaker cables, etc.).

                Velcro cable ties are available in a wide variety of colors, widths, and lengths.and work very well to keep "dangling straps" organized and out of the way. A 5-yard roll of black 3/4" double-sided velcro (loops on the front side, hooks on the back side) sells for under $10 - just cut the length needed off the roll, and you're in business.

                Not the most elegant solution, but it works well for me!

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                  #9
                  Any resolution to this challenge? I'm wishing I had a way to tidy up my shoulder straps on my Synapse 25.


                  Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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                    #10
                    Backpack strap bands. Easy. "ITW web dominator". Google it and check pics etc. cheap generally too. They used to be sold here. Must be out of stock. But they are only so big. Obviously if the strap is more than a certain size they won't fit properly. Mine will accomodate about 15mm strap width.


                    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by drobinson View Post
                      Any resolution to this challenge? I'm wishing I had a way to tidy up my shoulder straps on my Synapse 25.
                      @drobinson,

                      The neatest solution I've seen to this is by @tpnl:
                      Originally posted by tpnl View Post
                      I have tried the Velcro ties and they work well. However, I tend to adjust my backpack straps throughout the day and it is hard to adjust on the fly.

                      I saw on another backpack that they attached the dangling end webbing to a D-ring that was already threaded through the part of the webbing attached to the bottom of the backpack. I built my own version using a 1" tri-glide and D-Ring.
                      To install it, I unthreaded the backpack strap webbing and threaded it through the D-Ring. I then rethreaded it back through the shoulder strap and then through the tri-glide. I then looped it through the D-Ring and then back though the tri-glide (it sounds complicated but is similar to how the Absolute Strap is threaded around the end hook which is not hard to do).

                      Here is a picture of the final product. It keeps the dangling ends at bay and allow me to adjust the straps easily.



                      This may be too much work to be worth it but I found it a good clean solution if you are willing to do some tinkering.
                      I also did something similar for the sternum straps using 3/4" tri-glides and D-Rings.

                      Hope this helps.

                      Cheers!

                      Edit:

                      I was asked how I threaded the tri-glide and D-ring on each shoulder strap so I have added a few instructions that hopefully will help out a bit:



                      Note the tri-glides and d-rings are 1" versions - which is the size that fits the current S25 / SA / BB strap webbing.

                      1) Unthread the webbing from the buckle on the backpack shoulder strap (remember how it was done) and thread the d-ring through the (now loose) webbing strap

                      2) Rethread the webbing back through the shoulder strap buckle. The D-ring should now be "trapped" between the bottom strap attachment point and the shoulder strap buckle

                      3) Once through the shoulder strap buckle, thread the webbing though both openings in the tri-glide. Experiment as to which side you want thread the webbing on the tri-glide as it is slightly arched

                      4) Thread the webbing through the d-ring again

                      5) Thread the webbing back again through the openings in the tri-glide to secure the end there – essentially, you create a loop. This will requires a bit of work as it will be tight and you will need to adjust the play in the webbing so you have enough length to thread things easier.
                      Optional: Depending on how you like it, you can thread the webbing though one or both slits of the tri-glide.

                      I have also tried, starting at step 3, just threading though the first opening of the tri-glide, then through the d-ring and then back through the other tri-glide opening. This seems to be an easier way but it is not as "neat" – close though.
                      I'll just add that the 1" Tri-glides can be ordered from parts. I'm not sure where @tpnl sourced his D-rings, but I'd be inclined to try Milspec Monkey, which maintains pretty good DIY (do-it-yourself) pages for parts, such as this one for D-rings, and also can be used as a source of web dominators (but you might alternatively order from Amazon).

                      As a another variant, see the Tom Bihn Forums Hacks Video Part II starting at 00:39 for @terayon's method, again using Tri-glides.


                      As @LordAnubis commented, popular solutions for strap management include web dominators and velcro solutions such as Strapeez.

                      For some threads that show web dominators in use, try @thephotomatt's Synapse 25 – A Photo Review + Mods + What's In My Bag thread, Excess strap management, Easy ways to deal with dangly straps, or Corralling (Sp?) Backpack Straps, and other links to posts within these threads.

                      For velcro, I prefer Tech Zone - Chunky Large Hook and Loop Fastener Cable Ties or similar other chunky versions of Velcro ties to Strapeez for strap management. Or, if you want narrower Velcro, these iGADGET straps should work.


                      HTH

                      moriond

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                        #12
                        I think the hack Moriond mentioned is the best:
                        As a another variant, see the Tom Bihn Forums Hacks Video Part II starting at 00:39 for @terayon's method, again using Tri-glides.
                        It has a great tutorial!

                        I like it so much I would like to see that solution standard in all TB backpacks.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Zephyrnoid View Post
                          Strap Tag End - Retainer Bands. I'm not sure what else to call them and please tell me if the subject has come up before.
                          The ring of fabric or leather around a strap or belt to keep the end from flapping around is called a "keeper."

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by moriond View Post
                            @drobinson,

                            The neatest solution I've seen to this is by @tpnl:


                            I'll just add that the 1" Tri-glides can be ordered from parts. I'm not sure where @tpnl sourced his D-rings, but I'd be inclined to try Milspec Monkey, which maintains pretty good DIY (do-it-yourself) pages for parts, such as this one for D-rings, and also can be used as a source of web dominators (but you might alternatively order from Amazon).

                            As a another variant, see the Tom Bihn Forums Hacks Video Part II starting at 00:39 for @terayon's method, again using Tri-glides.


                            As @LordAnubis commented, popular solutions for strap management include web dominators and velcro solutions such as Strapeez.

                            For some threads that show web dominators in use, try @thephotomatt's Synapse 25 – A Photo Review + Mods + What's In My Bag thread, Excess strap management, Easy ways to deal with dangly straps, or Corralling (Sp?) Backpack Straps, and other links to posts within these threads.

                            For velcro, I prefer Tech Zone - Chunky Large Hook and Loop Fastener Cable Ties or similar other chunky versions of Velcro ties to Strapeez for strap management. Or, if you want narrower Velcro, these iGADGET straps should work.


                            HTH

                            moriond
                            Thanks for digging these out @moriond . All great ideas. I think I'll go for the triglides because I don't adjust shoulder straps often.


                            Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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                              #15
                              Has anyone tried those black Scunci hairbands as a keeper?

                              I'll try it tonight and report back.

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