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New: Ruck's Sac Backpack (Available July 4th)

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  • gmanedit
    replied
    Wild guess: It has been discontinued, replaced by the Synapse as suitable for small persons, or it's being redesigned to be sleeker (removal of the projecting outside pocket).

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  • MtnMan
    replied
    Question to the Bihn crew: is the Ruk's Sack history, or could it be replenished at some point in the future?

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  • ex machina
    replied
    Originally posted by MtnMan View Post
    I checked the backpack category page, and it looks like the Ruk's Sack disappeared.

    Are supplies run out? Or has it simply been discontinued?

    If any more can be made, count me as favoring Sapphire or Steel as the exterior color and Steel as the interior. I hope Ruk hasn't left us for good.
    I found the Ruck's page by using search and entering 'Ruck'. It says 'SOLD OUT' in the pick-a-color drop down menu. I don't know if that means its the end of the line for the Ruck, but it seems pretty clear there are no more unless another production run is done.

    Leave a comment:


  • MtnMan
    replied
    I checked the backpack category page, and it looks like the Ruk's Sack disappeared.

    Are supplies run out? Or has it simply been discontinued?

    If any more can be made, count me as favoring Sapphire or Steel as the exterior color and Steel as the interior. I hope Ruk hasn't left us for good.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nana8
    replied
    I was hoping to order 2 Ruck's Sacs after the first of the year -- this thought makes me very nervous! PLEASE don't discontinue this bag!!

    Leave a comment:


  • MtnMan
    replied
    What's up with the Ruck's Sac? According to its web page, it is now down to being available in one exterior color (Olive). I had inquired about it, and it was said to be unavailable in Sapphire exterior. (I was interested in Sapphire.) Does this mean that the Ruc's Sack is being phased out, and the colors are not be replenished, or will the other colors be available sometime down the road?

    Leave a comment:


  • ex machina
    replied
    Dyneema Cafe Bags and Dyneema Questions.

    Originally posted by Darcy View Post
    What I really want next is a Dyneema Cafe Bag! Wouldn't that be cool? I think so. Especially in the hot Summer: the Dyneema is so light.
    Maybe a Dyneema strap with poron insert too. Though because of the properties of Dyneema, I think it may have to be sewn in place, and a tie/fold-upon-itself system used for setting length as sliders wouldn't find purchase to bite?

    Any developments on a cafe bag in Dyneema, Darcy?

    Does anyone know if there is clothing available made from Dyneema? I have seen via Web search some body armor and gloves that use Dyneema as a component, but I want a wind breaker. I wonder if there are any bespoke/custom tailors that use Dyneema?

    Leave a comment:


  • Skylark
    replied
    Dyneema Cafe Bag! Yes

    Originally posted by Darcy View Post
    What I really want next is a Dyneema Cafe Bag! Wouldn't that be cool? I think so. Especially in the hot Summer: the Dyneema is so light.
    Sounds just like what I need for birding trips - book and binoculars. Please add this to TB's ever lengthening to do list!

    Leave a comment:


  • escapegoat
    replied
    i bought mine recently! ^_^ i really like it for a number of reasons. the straps fit my shoulders great (a big plus because i have never had a backpack that fit me) and i love the design.

    thanks, guys! i have been recommending you to my customers as well as my friends when they start talking about laptop bags. =D

    Leave a comment:


  • moriond
    replied
    Originally posted by Darcy View Post
    Thanks for posting that, moriond!

    I can't remember removing the Dyneema Wikipedia Entry link from our site, but maybe I did at some point.
    If you did remove the link, it was because the Wikipedia entry may have been inaccessible. When Tom posted or referenced the Dyneema link, the discussion page for the entry at the Wikipedia site already showed objections from some people at having a separate entry for a brand name and arguing to subsume the entry under a UHMWPE entry. About 3 weeks later, the separate Dyneema entry disappeared, and I think the link to the Wikipedia on the Tom Bihn page got deleted. Later on the Wikipedia link to Dyneema worked as a redirect to the UHMWPE description. I recall seeing the Dyneema links again in the product descriptions.

    I just fetched back the link that Tom first pointed us to, because I found it clearer.

    moriond

    Leave a comment:


  • Darcy
    replied
    Originally posted by moriond View Post
    I actually prefer the original Wikipedia Entry for Dyneema given on the Tom Bihn web pages about a year and a half ago.
    Thanks for posting that, moriond!

    I can't remember removing the Dyneema Wikipedia Entry link from our site, but maybe I did at some point.

    Someday soon we'll have our own materials glossary on the TOM BIHN site where we'll provide succinct definitions of the materials we use and links to more detailed definitions.

    Leave a comment:


  • moriond
    replied
    Dyneema

    Originally posted by Darcy View Post
    Dyneema is what we make the Packing Cubes out of. You can read about it in Wikipedia.
    I actually prefer the original Wikipedia Entry for Dyneema given on the Tom Bihn web pages about a year and a half ago. It's more succinct for lay readers. For example, it begins:
    Dyneema® is a synthetic fiber based on UHMWPE, 15 times stronger than steel and up to 40% stronger than Kevlar. It is usually used in bulletproof vests, bow strings, climbing equipment and high performance sails in yachting. Dyneema® was invented by DSM in 1979.
    and the second paragraph on its chemistry and properties starts:
    Dyneema fibers derive their strength from the extreme length of each individual molecule. The fibre can attain a parallel orientation greater than 95% and a level of crystallinity of up to 85%. In contrast, Kevlar derives its strength from strong bonding between relatively short molecules.
    In contrast, the much longer current entry in Darcy's links starts:
    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), also known as high modulus polyethylene (HMPE) or high performance polyethylene (HPPE), is a thermoplastic. It has extremely long chains, with molecular weight numbering in the millions, usually between 2 and 6 million. The longer chain serves to transfer load more effectively to the polymer backbone by strengthening intermolecular interactions. This results in a
    very tough material, with the highest impact strength of any thermoplastic presently made.
    and goes on to say:
    UHMWPE is a type of polyolefin and, despite relatively weak Van der Waals bonds between its molecules, derives ample strength from the length of each individual molecule. It is made up of extremely long chains of polyethylene, which all align in the same direction. Each chain is bonded to the others with so many Van der Waals bonds that the whole can support great tensile loads.

    When formed to fibers, the polymer chains can attain a parallel orientation greater than 95% and a level of crystallinity of up to 85%. In contrast, Kevlar derives its strength from strong bonding between relatively short molecules.
    You can also read more about Dyneema in the packing cube thread, and my original post linking the old Wikipedia description:
    Originally posted by moriond View Post
    There was a great link to the Wikipedia Entry for Dyneema given on the Tom Bihn web pages over a year ago. A few weeks later, the Wikipedia folks changed it to this entry on Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (on the grounds that Dyneema was a brand name), and the link disappeared from the Tom Bihn pages.

    I thought this was pretty interesting reading at the time, and may reinforce Tom's comment about:
    Weighs next to nothing, yet the Dyneema fabric makes it close to slash-proof.
    with some background information. Just something else for you packing cube enthusiasts to obsess over! (Time travel back to the original Dyneema entry courtesy of the Internet Archive Wayback machine.)

    A brief history of Dyneema fibers is also given at this Australian web site
    Last edited by moriond; 07-18-2007, 11:32 AM. Reason: Remove repeated section of Quote and add in Tom's quote

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  • Darcy
    replied
    Originally posted by maverick View Post
    can you describe what dyneema fabric is like? i'm not sure if i may have come across it in any of my bags.
    Dyneema is what we make the Packing Cubes out of. You can read about it in Wikipedia.

    Leave a comment:


  • Darcy
    replied
    Originally posted by mrae View Post
    Can you post some pictures showing the inner colors and how they look with the outer one?
    We'll try to do this soon.

    Leave a comment:


  • Patrick
    replied
    Originally posted by thax View Post
    Ok, to be honest at first blush this is the first TB bag I don't really like the look of. The square flat flap and square pocket on the cylindrical bag just doesn't do it for me. I like the pocket in the flap and all, but the whole thing kinda bothers me.
    I am sure it is functional and works with the drawstring, but a larger flap or different shape would make it more cohesive.

    I do respect the fact that all the designs are always fresh and new.
    hehe that square flap is the most appealing feature to me :P

    Leave a comment:

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