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    #31
    @Ms. Ferret, you just might have convinced me that I now need a cafe bag. Except olive been put on a bag ban!!!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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      #32
      Originally posted by Moose View Post
      Ms. Ferret, more detail please. This is brilliant! I must do this.
      Moose
      Extend the strap all the way, then thread the Gatekeeper through both the strap and those lower loops on the MCB (originally meant to attach a waist strap I think) on either side. The "backpack" straps are pretty short so it's not ideal, but it can work in a pinch.

      I remembered another post from a while back where I'd tried this with S-biners, but I've since picked up some Parts to customize my SA (WIP), and the Gatekeepers work better.

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        #33
        Not a very original hack, but I I use an A5 three-ring notebook slipped into a FJN. One side of the cover slips perfectly under the side with the pen pockets, the other side of the cover hangs free.

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          #34
          I have found the key straps work better with a 1/2" key ring in between the clips when hooking to anything other than keys. Click image for larger version

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            #35
            Originally posted by SKIMT View Post
            I have found the key straps work better with a 1/2" key ring in between the clips when hooking to anything other than keys.
            Similar to SKIMT, I wanted an adaptor between 2 snap hooks. However, I didn't want to use metal; I wanted plastic O-rings like those sewn into TB bags. I found these cabone rings at Michaels: Boye® Cabone Rings . I find the 0.75 in. rings work best as pictured here.

            Click image for larger version

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            I also like to use the Utility Strap - Tether and secure multitools, flashlights, knives - TOM BIHN , which will hold up to 3 pouches.

            Click image for larger version

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              #36
              Even better!

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                #37
                SKIMT can I ask you which camera and lens you used for this picture? It is such a simple motive but the picture looks so stunning.

                Ilkyway
                “Ankh-Morpork people considered that spelling was a sort of optional extra. They believed in it in the same way they believed in punctuation; it didn't matter where you put it so long as it was there.”

                By Sir Terence David John Pratchett from The Truth

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                  #38
                  See DaMacGuy's thread http://forums.tombihn.com/photos-vid...e-bag-edc.html Posts #10 and #12 for how I use a square key ring to add an exterior "O-ring" to my cafe bags and my idea for attaching a water bottle to a medium CB.

                  Click image for larger version

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                    #39
                    Originally posted by Ilkyway View Post
                    SKIMT can I ask you which camera and lens you used for this picture? It is such a simple motive but the picture looks so stunning.

                    Ilkyway

                    Thanks for the compliment! It was just my iPhone 6 edited with the free app Aviary. The blur was done with radial focus and then I added a vignette to fade the edges to black.

                    I have a high end DSLR for my job which I use for professional architectural photography but to be honest these phones and the free editing apps take good enough images and editing as the full scale hardware and Photoshop setup for all of my personal day to day shooting.

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                      #40
                      OK, I have a few. No pictures, sorry.

                      1. Travel Laundry Stuff Sack as travel knitting bag. When I'm going on a long trip, with international flights and boring nights alone in a hotel room, that means only one thing: lots of quality knitting time. Obviously, I want to maximize the hours of knitting I can squeeze out of the amount of yarn I'm hauling, which means starting a new project. So I pull out my trusty TLSS, and put the wound, ready to knit center-pull balls of yarn in one end, the pattern and needles (in TB needle pouches) in the other. When I start knitting, I pull the ball out of one side, and the project-in-progress goes in the other side. As the knitting progresses, I keep taking new balls of yarn out of one end and the total bulk of the bag remains the same; all of the knitting is in the same bag, so the bulk stays the same throughout, and everything stays organized and tangle-free. Bonus: because the TLSS is sized to fit in the end pocket of an Aeronaut, it, well, fits very nicely in the end pocket of an Aeronaut. So you can sit down at the departure gate, plunk down your Aeronaut, open the end pocket and start knitting with the TLSS positioned inside and the yarn feeding out. When they call your row, all you have to do is stuff knitting back into one end, pull the drawstring shut and zip the pocket. Once at your seat, pull the whole thing out, put Aeronaut overhead, and you are set for knitting inflight. (It is, of course, best to stick with plastic double-points and short circulars, lest people think you are a knitting terrorist of some sort.)

                      2. COP in pencil/pen size works really well as a knitting chart holder. Print your chart on A4 paper (letter is too wide, although of course you can trim it) and fold it so that it fits in the visible window of the COP, with the fold lines running neatly along the chart lines (one fold per 10 rows on my printer, but this will obviously vary). As you work your way through the chart, pull it out every ten rows and flip it to show the next section. You can thereby keep your chart from getting lost in transit (horrors!) and you can also keep it readily visible by clipping it to whatever larger bag you've got nearby, so it doesn't slide down under your tray table or whatever.

                      3. For those traveling with allergies and asthma: Size 4 Knitting Tool Pouch is exactly the right size for a disk inhaler. (In Aubergine, it even matches the color of my disk inhaler!) And size 2 tool pouches neatly fit two epi-pens (although those come in different sizes, so measure yours). Both clip nicely inside your bag so you don't have to spend any time at all rooting for something you need RIGHT NOW.

                      4. Knitting Needle pouches are lovely for organizing needles in transit, but, being floppy, don't really protect your more fragile needles (size 0 Clover bamboo DPs, I'm looking at you) from breakage. A rigid 6" ruler slid inside the size 2 case accomplishes that nicely, with the bonus of adding a ruler to your equipment (always a good idea!). I use a little cardboard ruler with, um, a holographic image of dancing penguins, just because it's a bit wider than the usual, and, hey, more entertaining.

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                        #41
                        This ^ ^ ^ is fantastic! LIKE!

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                          #42
                          Originally posted by Abby View Post
                          OK, I have a few. No pictures, sorry.

                          3. For those traveling with allergies and asthma: Size 4 Knitting Tool Pouch is exactly the right size for a disk inhaler. (In Aubergine, it even matches the color of my disk inhaler!) And size 2 tool pouches neatly fit two epi-pens (although those come in different sizes, so measure yours). Both clip nicely inside your bag so you don't have to spend any time at all rooting for something you need RIGHT NOW.
                          Thanks for sharing this! As a fellow Advair user (guessing from the purple color) I am going to take advantage of this hint for more stylish containment of my medicines. Wishing you healthy travels...toting the medicines does add another layer of complexity.

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                            #43
                            Click image for larger version

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                            @gostanford, it's the local equivalent, but the same size. Still purple!

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                              #44
                              Thank you, Abby, for the Epipen fitting in knitting tool pouches tip! I have been putting my Epipens in the small inner pocket of my MCB, but this is so much better.
                              "Do one thing every day that scares you." - Eleanor Roosevelt
                              "Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it." -Ferris Bueller

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                                #45
                                Originally posted by NWhikergal View Post
                                Thank you, Abby, for the Epipen fitting in knitting tool pouches tip! I have been putting my Epipens in the small inner pocket of my MCB, but this is so much better.
                                Like @Abby says, measure the pens first. I find that an EpiPen Junior minus the hard case fits well in a size 2 KP, but inside the hard case it does not fit into the pouch. I am going to try a size 3 instead...need to order one. I agree this would be a great way to clip the EpiPens into a bag rather than have them floating around in the loose pocket.

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