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Anyone own both a Kindle and an iPad? Need advice

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  • MaggieScratch
    replied
    I second the suggestion to use Calibre for file conversion and sideloading. It makes it soooo easy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shiva
    replied
    Hi Earth5: thank you. got it. I will check it out....

    Leave a comment:


  • Janine
    replied
    Originally posted by MaggieScratch View Post
    wild godless reading spree
    This is my new favorite phrase!

    Leave a comment:


  • MaggieScratch
    replied
    I own neither an iPad nor a Kindle, but I do have a Nook Color and a Nook Simple Touch, so it's the same dilemma--color tablet vs. eInk reader?

    I take the NST in my EDC--currently an SCB (that's a lot of acronyms). I have it in a Nook ST pouch and it clips nicely to an O ring. Since I'll be reading it at lunch and/or on the train (I often crochet or tat on the train, not read), I don't have to worry about lighting, and the eInk is a pleasant reading experience; but the big reason is because it is small and light. Another big consideration is the battery life, which on the latest generation or two of eInk devices is amazing.

    At home, and when I'm running errands on the weekend, I usually carry the Nook Color (and I'm considering upgrading to a Nexus 7--probably around Christmas--there are some rumors around about an updated version). It's bigger and heavier but still quite portable. I definitely prefer it for reading when I have access to Wifi, so I use it in my apartment almost exclusively. I like being able to read a book, touch a word or a name, highlight it, and then tell the NC to look it up on Google/Wikipedia. I also subscribe to several magazines, and reading them on the NC is a superior experience due to the color screen. I owned several e-Ink devices prior to getting the NC and I wasn't sure I would like reading regular text books on the NC, but I like it a lot--the screen is high-res and very nice to read, and the more recent Nook tablets are even better in that regard.

    If I were embarking on a several-day reading spree--for instance, last year after I saw the film of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo around Christmas, I had a few days off and spent a lot of time re-reading all three of the books in a wild godless reading spree--I would use the NST, because the battery would hold out. For the NC, I had to stop reading and re-power the device a couple of times, because I do more than read on it, and having it hooked to Wifi also drains the battery. In fact, it was that episode that convinced me to buy the NST!

    So I certainly have a use for both devices, and will continue to use both. If I were traveling, I would be more likely to take the tablet, unless I knew I wanted to do a lot of reading on a very long plane flight or bus/train ride with no access to repower a device. For leisure travel, the tablet and my smartphone are all I need computing-wise (and sometimes I don't even need the tablet).
    Last edited by MaggieScratch; 10-04-2012, 09:06 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • earth5
    replied
    @Shiva: You don't download Calibre to anything but your laptop. You simply copy the file you want to your device. There's a way to sync to your device, but I don't have my micro USB cable with me to write up the exact instructions for you. Basically, once you have Calibre installed on your laptop, you populate your digital library (books, articles, etc). Then, if you need to, you can convert your library media to a format compatible with your device (I prefer PDF because I'm anti-proprietary *grin*). Then you sync the media to your device. Or, if you prefer, you can just navigate to the file that has your book/article/whatever and copy the file over.

    There are ways around DRM (it's my book dammit), but the legal community frowns on them. Take that as you will.

    @snowbot: With you on changing out book covers. I've been known to go with a worse-quality image just so it matches the cover the book had when I read it physically (have a library of my old sci-fi/fantasy books so that maybe I can one day convince myself to purge my physical library).

    @notmensa: I'm working on my PhD too. Funny how easy it is to get distracted by everything BUT your dissertation. Like, oh, checking these forums *BIG GRIN*

    Leave a comment:


  • snowbot
    replied
    Shiva, eBook formatting and DRM (Digital Rights Management) drive me crazy. Basically, each of the major eBook companies have their own proprietary format. For example, Kindle books tend to be .azw3, but iBooks are .epub. Calibre will convert between them between the formats. There may be a hitch, though, and that hitch is DRM. Amazon doesn't want you to be able to share your Kindle Books with anyone else. Therefore, they essentially lock your Kindle files with your Kindle account information and encryption referred to as DRM. Many of the big eBook companies try to make sure that a DRM-d eBook file cannot be converted to another format. There is a nice discussion about DRM (mainly in relation to Calibre) here.

    Note that there are publishers who don't DRM their books. In the Sci-Fi/Fantasy genre, Baen and Weightless Books are examples. If you purchase a Baen eBook directly from Baen, you are free to convert it to whatever format you want and to read it on however many devices you have. If you buy a classic novel from Amazon on Kindle, you probably won't be able to easily read it in iBooks. But if you got that eBook from a Project Gutenberg-aligned site, you'd likely have no trouble.

    Here's a quick tutorial on using Calibre for different devices. It's a little dated; I believe there are now additional ways of getting Calibre material onto eBook devices. Also, the Calibre manual, while dauntingly long, is pretty good. I learned a lot about eBooks from the Calibre FAQ and eBook Conversion chapter.

    Leave a comment:


  • Katy
    replied
    Originally posted by earth5 View Post
    Calibre is a software program that can act as a digital library. You don't get books for free, but you can convert them to different formats. (Well, you can get them for free if you consider working around some DRMs as free). With Calibre, you can tag your books/pdfs, sort by title, author, genre, rating, etc. You can give put your books into series (if you're like me and can't remember which book in the series needs to be read next) and can add books covers to the files if they're missing. Just take the file, and drag/drop it into Calibre (there's also a wizard if you're more comfortable with that). By default, the file will be renamed and moved to the /calibre library folder, so everything's in one place. The other wonderful thing Calibre does is convert files to other formats (as mentioned above).

    The formats available are: epub, mobi, azw3, fb2, htmlz, lit, lrf, pdb, pdf, and pmlz. You can convert individual files or batches of them, keeping or deleting the original file as you see fit. This means you can take a file and read it on your Nook, Kindle, and/or phone by converting it to the right file type. For instance, I convert everything to PDF and just use the PDF reader on my phone. But, books for my daughter I convert so that she can read them through the Nook player, keeping her library separate from mine. You can also sync books to your device when it's plugged in. And you can share those files without having to "loan" e-books (stupid DRMs)

    Calibre is free, so there's really no reason not to try it (calibre-ebook[dot]com). There's also plugins so you can find duplicates, link to Goodreads, etc. Jeez, I sound like an ad. I don't mean to. I really like being able to convert books to PDF and get really annoyed with Amazon's proprietary-ness. Plus list formats work better for me than visual bookshelves. In short, I really like Calibre (and it's free!)

    Hope that helps answer the Calibre question =)

    I didn't know it could link to Goodreads!! Squee!!!!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • notmensa
    replied
    Hi, I've just bought a Sony Reader (T1). I'm a PhD student and figured that I could use the Sony reader for all my journal articles and text books. The biggest issue for me is distractions!! I'd loooooove to get an iPad, but I know I'd be constantly online and checking email and generally NOT doing my phd! The Sony reader does have an internet browser, but it's obviously not in colour so not as tempting as other devices (phone, laptop, the much-desired ipad).... I'm still working out how to use the Sony Reader - at the moment I've just got some 'how to do a phd' type books on it, and I consider it a little bit of a break from my studies. But I do hope to load all my journal articles on it at some point.

    So ... yeah, I can see the value in a Kindle. But for a multi-purpose device, that can do lots more than just show books, I think the iPad is simply unbeatable at this point. (Yes, this is me building my business case to buy an ipad!!!!)

    Good luck!!

    -n

    Leave a comment:


  • Shiva
    replied
    ebooks

    so I thought I was geeky, but clearly not.
    Not sure what these file formats are: epub; mobi; azw3 etc., The only one I recognize is pdf! Which one does Kindle use? Ipad? etc.,
    I downloaded Calibre on my Macbook air. How do I download it to Kindle? or make it work with a kindle? not sure I could figure that out.
    also saw that there are a number of books via archive.org--but not sure how to convert them to read on Kindle or Ipad.

    Some step by step explanation would be much appreciated!
    sorry to be daft!

    s


    Originally posted by earth5 View Post
    Calibre is a software program that can act as a digital library. You don't get books for free, but you can convert them to different formats. (Well, you can get them for free if you consider working around some DRMs as free). With Calibre, you can tag your books/pdfs, sort by title, author, genre, rating, etc. You can give put your books into series (if you're like me and can't remember which book in the series needs to be read next) and can add books covers to the files if they're missing. Just take the file, and drag/drop it into Calibre (there's also a wizard if you're more comfortable with that). By default, the file will be renamed and moved to the /calibre library folder, so everything's in one place. The other wonderful thing Calibre does is convert files to other formats (as mentioned above).

    The formats available are: epub, mobi, azw3, fb2, htmlz, lit, lrf, pdb, pdf, and pmlz. You can convert individual files or batches of them, keeping or deleting the original file as you see fit. This means you can take a file and read it on your Nook, Kindle, and/or phone by converting it to the right file type. For instance, I convert everything to PDF and just use the PDF reader on my phone. But, books for my daughter I convert so that she can read them through the Nook player, keeping her library separate from mine. You can also sync books to your device when it's plugged in. And you can share those files without having to "loan" e-books (stupid DRMs)

    Calibre is free, so there's really no reason not to try it (calibre-ebook[dot]com). There's also plugins so you can find duplicates, link to Goodreads, etc. Jeez, I sound like an ad. I don't mean to. I really like being able to convert books to PDF and get really annoyed with Amazon's proprietary-ness. Plus list formats work better for me than visual bookshelves. In short, I really like Calibre (and it's free!)

    Hope that helps answer the Calibre question =)

    Leave a comment:


  • snowbot
    replied
    I'm also a fan of Calibre. It helps me manage my book library and it also lets me replace bad e-book cover art with better downloadable art.

    I do a lot of reading on my iPad. I prefer the iBooks app to the Kindle app on the iPad, although I hate the iBooks store. I sync my iBooks and Kindle book marks with my iPhone so that I can read a few pages over lunch or on the bus.

    I've not tried the Kindle device.

    Leave a comment:


  • earth5
    replied
    Calibre is a software program that can act as a digital library. You don't get books for free, but you can convert them to different formats. (Well, you can get them for free if you consider working around some DRMs as free). With Calibre, you can tag your books/pdfs, sort by title, author, genre, rating, etc. You can give put your books into series (if you're like me and can't remember which book in the series needs to be read next) and can add books covers to the files if they're missing. Just take the file, and drag/drop it into Calibre (there's also a wizard if you're more comfortable with that). By default, the file will be renamed and moved to the /calibre library folder, so everything's in one place. The other wonderful thing Calibre does is convert files to other formats (as mentioned above).

    The formats available are: epub, mobi, azw3, fb2, htmlz, lit, lrf, pdb, pdf, and pmlz. You can convert individual files or batches of them, keeping or deleting the original file as you see fit. This means you can take a file and read it on your Nook, Kindle, and/or phone by converting it to the right file type. For instance, I convert everything to PDF and just use the PDF reader on my phone. But, books for my daughter I convert so that she can read them through the Nook player, keeping her library separate from mine. You can also sync books to your device when it's plugged in. And you can share those files without having to "loan" e-books (stupid DRMs)

    Calibre is free, so there's really no reason not to try it (calibre-ebook[dot]com). There's also plugins so you can find duplicates, link to Goodreads, etc. Jeez, I sound like an ad. I don't mean to. I really like being able to convert books to PDF and get really annoyed with Amazon's proprietary-ness. Plus list formats work better for me than visual bookshelves. In short, I really like Calibre (and it's free!)

    Hope that helps answer the Calibre question =)

    Leave a comment:


  • Shiva
    replied
    Jbonet: ha: i did not read this earlier. Can you tell me how Calibre works?

    Leave a comment:


  • Shiva
    replied
    gmanedit: I have been looking at the Kindle. The Kindle touch. I am not sure how to subscribe to newspapers or blogs. Someone said there is a way to get them all for free via something called Calibre? does anyone know?

    Leave a comment:


  • BPritchard
    replied
    MobiPocket

    Originally posted by jbonet View Post
    I have an iPad 2 and a Kindle Keyboard. I love and use both. The Kindle is great on buses, trains and in the car (my wife does the driving). I carry both in my Ristretto for iPad, and there's still space for the Apple Wireless Keyboard.
    I use a program called calibre <www.calibre-ebook.com> to convert between .pdf, .epub (iPad) and .mobi (Kindle) formats.
    There is also Mobipocket eBook Creator
    which I have used to create a trip itinerary.

    Leave a comment:


  • jbonet
    replied
    I have an iPad 2 and a Kindle Keyboard. I love and use both. The Kindle is great on buses, trains and in the car (my wife does the driving). I carry both in my Ristretto for iPad, and there's still space for the Apple Wireless Keyboard.
    I use a program called calibre <www.calibre-ebook.com> to convert between .pdf, .epub (iPad) and .mobi (Kindle) formats.

    Leave a comment:

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