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Brands and Stuff That You Love (Emphasis on Quality)

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  • bijoux
    replied
    AESOP Australia

    Particularly the hand sanitiser. Easy to use with a flip top lid, non-sticky, lovely herbal scent. I also use their spray deodorant.

    Leave a comment:


  • GrussGott
    replied
    I'll add something I recently bought and it's giving me so much joy, I have to share it, albeit for a niche group: veterans of The Struggle.

    The Struggle is when you share a bed and your partner/spouse likes the air temperature 10+ degrees different from you; in my case she likes it about 70F, I like it about 55F. How we've stayed married for decades, I dunno

    But then recently a sleep specialist told me about the chilipad!

    At first it sounds a little scary: it's a mattress pad (for one side) that circulates cool (or warm) water. He insisted on it's quality, so I bought one. Two weeks in I can say HOLY MOLY this thing is a life changer! Every night I can't WAIT to get into bed: super cool sheets, cold all night long. No more sleeping coverless and waking up sweating, no more long waits to fall asleep, just super comfortable cool deep sleep. I'm falling asleep in like 15 min now, it's amazing!

    You can buy them on amazon (from the manufacturer) for cheaper, although not cheap, $300, but I can honestly say I'd pay that just for the 2 weeks of pure sleep I've gotten so far. I can't believe I didn't know about this thing. If you have trouble sleeping, especially if it's due to temp regulation, definitely give it a shot! (30 day trial period on mine)

    I've got a plastic barrier and then towels just in case it leaks but I don't think it will, it's built very solid, although I'll update if it does. One thing I would note - if you have high humidity in your room, I could see having trouble with condensation just like a glass of ice water so I wouldn't recommend it in those cases. No problems whatsoever for me so far, but I'll keep you posted - In the meantime, oh boy do I recommend the Chilipad!
    Last edited by GrussGott; 03-11-2020, 11:22 PM.

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  • halstead.nathan
    replied
    A few things I love are:

    Tactile Turn pens: https://tactileturn.com

    I use their Bolt Action Pen in Copper. I love the weight and feel of the product. Seems like it would last forever.

    Filson (not all products):

    I use a 24-Hour Briefcase and I absolutely love it. It’s laid out similarly to a Pilot without the water bottle middle channel. I love the craftsmanship and material. I also own a coat from them that is fantastic as are their Mackinaw wool products.

    Western Rise: https://westernrise.com

    These are new to me, but I really like their pants. They seem very durable and are lightweight.

    WoolX and other merino t shirts:

    I travel almost exclusively with Merino wool t shirts. I can wear them for 4-5 days without odor and I wash them in the sink.

    Darn Tough socks:

    When I bought darn tough socks I threw away the rest of my sock collection. I now own a handful of crew socks and a few longer socks and that’s it. My sock drawer is now extremely empty but easily organized.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • GrussGott
    replied
    Originally posted by autolycus View Post
    Asics have usually been my other standard casual shoe brand, but I haven't tried on any current models to know if they've changed their general sizing
    I have lots of shoe thoughts! : ) Here are some of my travel shoes ...

    For city touring on foot
    I'm also using ASICS for my travel city shoe - I just bought a pair of Gel Nimbus 21s to replace an old pair. I love the ASICS for city travel because they're super durable, have lots of protection, hold up to rain (but not water resistant!), have lots of cushioning for walking and standing, and they're available in mute colors (I have a pair of light grey ones - very nondescript). The note on the new ones is, definitely order one full size up. Other shoes I occasionally use and love for this are Scarpa Mojitos and Vasque Rift, although both of these are more outdoor / woods than city use.

    For air travel
    Here I violate my air travel rule of no synthetic clothing (which will melt to your skin and immobilize you in a fire) - I just bought a pair of Hoka ONE ONE Rincons. They're EXTREMELY light, like almost not there light, they have a ton of cushioning, and most important to me are two additional features: they are super breathable as in the most breathable athletic shoe I've ever had, and they have a roll-step meaning they push you forward as you walk. This makes them great for airport speed-walking / running (Schiphol anyone??). These features also make them great for city touring use in the tropics, although they have zero water resistance. These are some of the best athletic shoes I've ever had for walking / running.

    For training
    My new favorites are ON Cloudflows. First, I love how these look - they're just plain cool to my eye; that said I use them for training, so not too many people see them : ) I love them because of a few features: super breathable, super light, somewhat cushy, and most importantly, super planted: these are try-and-push-me-over shoes. They are ultra-stable when standing so they work great for jumping around, weight lifting, etc

    For water use
    Without a doubt, Merrell choprock shandals. I've got a lot of others (columbia, tiva, et al) but these have the most support and protection, while also staying tight to my foot - plus you can swap out insoles to wool vs rubber so you can wear them as sandals when you know you won't be around water. The only trade-off is, despite their giant air holes, they're not as breathable as you'd think, but it's a decent trade-off for the protection.

    Sandals
    Over the years I found two brands work best for me: Naot (by far the highest quality sandal I've owned) of which I have multiple sandals and shoes. I find Naots to be much better than birkies in terms of durability, fit, and comfort. Olukai, with one caveat: i'm finding their older stuff to be much better than their newer stuff, so haven't bought many Olukais lately

    Flip-flops
    My go-tos are Olukais, and anything that's Hawaii Lifeguard Association endorsed as those are awesome around water and the pool - both super grippy on wet slippery surfaces, plus the footbed is also super grippy so you foot never slides around when wet.

    Yes I like shoes. Yes, it might be a problem. I'm working on it. (not really )
    Last edited by GrussGott; 03-07-2020, 04:56 PM.

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  • Ms. Ferret
    replied
    Originally posted by BWeaves View Post
    Ms. Ferret. Thank you!

    I also don't wash my wool garments unless they look soiled. They never smell.

    Can I also ask how URESHII DESIGN's finish their seams and hems?

    Do you have a favorite garment shape from them?
    My favorite garment is the Soft Top. I have SIX of them in different fabrics and colors. The shape is cute, but relaxed and comfortable enough to sleep in (I just woke up and may still be wearing the same merino one I wore yesterday), the cowl neck is great for temperature regulation, it's basically sleeveless (so it layers well under anything), but still has decent armpit/shoulder coverage. Now that the Pure Merino comes in Mermaid I am definitely picking up a few more.

    I don't really know enough about sewing to comment on the seams/hems, but Emily sometimes blogs about this kind of thing. I would just ask them if you've got a question about a specific garment.

    Leave a comment:


  • autolycus
    replied
    Originally posted by Darcy View Post
    Sounds like my feet! Someone told me Scarpa boots have a reputation for being a good fit for those with narrow feet, but that's not me and they fit me great so... I haven't worn Keens, Merrells, or Moabs, so can't compare to those. Chacos are a great fit for my feet, but I think they're more universally adaptable.
    To avoid anyone's future confusion, I should clarify that Moab is a very popular model/line from Merrell.

    I have a very old pair of Chaco sandals that I used to wear all summer. I haven't worn them in years because they're incredibly heavy compared to my current preferred Keen sandal, which also has the advantage of a closed toe--I'm at least a little prone to stubbing it. They were always extremely comfortable, though, so I may take a look back at their shoe options. Last time I checked they were pretty limited. Still a sandal company at heart--which I understand.

    FWIW, definitely try some Keens next time you're shopping for a pair of boots or hiking shoes. The Targhee line is still pretty close to the same shape as their older signature wide toe box. I think the Targhee III is a little narrower, but still fairly wide compared to some other brands.

    Asics have usually been my other standard casual shoe brand, but I haven't tried on any current models to know if they've changed their general sizing and footbed shape.

    For PaulT00, I see that you're in England, so this may not help, but I've had decent luck with Allen Edmonds for dress shoes. My foot is a pretty proper US 9EEE on the Brannock, and with most of their lasts, that's the right size. Their classic 65 last is a little trickier for me because it's got a longer, pointier toe and not as generous an instep as I prefer. The 201 last has more volume in the instep and toebox, so I have done a half size smaller in it in one pair. Sock choice has a big effect also.

    Leave a comment:


  • Darcy
    replied
    Knives by the bladesmith Daniel Gentile

    We traded Daniel some bags for knives, and the workmanship of the knives is top-notch. They're basically works of art.

    Originally posted by autolycus View Post
    What’s the General fit/ shape of Scarpa shoes? I’ve got a high instep and need shoes with a wide toe box. Always on the look out for other shoe brands that will work for me. For hiking shoes and boots, I’ve had good luck with Keen, but their lighter sneaker(-like) designs lately have been narrower and less forgiving of my instep.

    Merrells don’t work for me at all. I even have a pair of Moabs in their wide size, and they’re too narrow for anything but thin socks.
    Sounds like my feet! Someone told me Scarpa boots have a reputation for being a good fit for those with narrow feet, but that's not me and they fit me great so... I haven't worn Keens, Merrells, or Moabs, so can't compare to those. Chacos are a great fit for my feet, but I think they're more universally adaptable.

    Leave a comment:


  • PaulT00
    replied
    Originally posted by autolycus View Post
    What’s the General fit/ shape of Scarpa shoes? I’ve got a high instep and need shoes with a wide toe box. Always on the look out for other shoe brands that will work for me. For hiking shoes and boots, I’ve had good luck with Keen, but their lighter sneaker(-like) designs lately have been narrower and less forgiving of my instep.

    Merrells don’t work for me at all. I even have a pair of Moabs in their wide size, and they’re too narrow for anything but thin socks.
    I have terrible trouble with shoes because I have enormously wide feet and a quite high instep too. As in, nobody makes shoes which are wide enough and generally available, that I could wear at the "correct" size of about a UK 9. I tend to wear New Balance or Brooks trainers in a 10.5/2E width fitting - and have nearly an inch of space between my toe and the front of the shoe. My Scarpas are an 11 to get enough width, but the instep/ankle area can be tightened down with the lacing so that they don't slop.

    My most bizarre experience, recently, was finding a pair of lovely Russell & Bromley black suede Chelsea boots (I was looking for something sharp to wear to the Christmas party!) which are a snug but comfortable fit at a size 9.5 - all to do with the shape of the last and where the shoe widens toward the toes and ball of the foot, relative to the shape of my tootsies. Other models from the same manufacturer just wouldn't work at all, even going several sizes larger!
    Last edited by PaulT00; 03-05-2020, 02:53 AM.

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  • autolycus
    replied
    What’s the General fit/ shape of Scarpa shoes? I’ve got a high instep and need shoes with a wide toe box. Always on the look out for other shoe brands that will work for me. For hiking shoes and boots, I’ve had good luck with Keen, but their lighter sneaker(-like) designs lately have been narrower and less forgiving of my instep.

    Merrells don’t work for me at all. I even have a pair of Moabs in their wide size, and they’re too narrow for anything but thin socks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Darcy
    replied
    Originally posted by PaulT00 View Post
    I love my Scarpa boots and shoes (also mentioned earlier by gqb) - there's a pair of Terra GTX waterproof boots which are fantastic for walking with the dogs in muddy conditions, or on the beach in winter, and I also have a pair of their excellent waterproof walking shoes which look like technical trainers.
    Originally posted by GrussGott View Post
    I have a pair of Scarpa mojitos and while I don't use them for "approach", they were excellent in Japan as we did a ton of walking all over tokyo in some rainy conditions and they stuck like glue on slippery steps and other places.
    Yeah! I've been wearing Scarpa hiking boots for the last 15+ years. Very natural, comfortable fit. I have a GTX pair for wet/muddy/snow conditions and a non-waterproof pair that are a little more breathable and comfortable in the summer months.

    Along the same level of quality and fit: Le Chameau rain/mud boots. They make insulated and non-insulated versions; I pair my non-insulated boots with thick alpaca socks and they're plenty warm, despite being rubber boots. The fit, like the Scarpas, feels like it was made for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • GrussGott
    replied
    Originally posted by PaulT00 View Post
    I love my Scarpa boots and shoes (also mentioned earlier by gqb) - there's a pair of Terra GTX waterproof boots which are fantastic for walking with the dogs in muddy conditions, or on the beach in winter, and I also have a pair of their excellent waterproof walking shoes which look like technical trainers.
    I have a pair of Scarpa mojitos and while I don't use them for "approach", they were excellent in Japan as we did a ton of walking all over tokyo in some rainy conditions and they stuck like glue on slippery steps and other places.

    Leave a comment:


  • G42
    replied
    Originally posted by PaulT00 View Post

    Kitchen knives: a 6" Global knife (no idea which model!) which I bought 20 years ago has been heavily used - but looked after - and is still our go-to kitchen knife for just about everything except peeling root veg. I got it when I was living in digs in London, then it came home 8 years later. These days my partner does a lot of the cooking, but also somehow ends up using the same knife, out of the half dozen on the knife rack, almost all the time...
    +1 on the Global knives... I have the paring knife and Chef's knife... very nicely balanced and fit a wide range of hands

    Leave a comment:


  • BWeaves
    replied
    Ms. Ferret. Thank you!

    I also don't wash my wool garments unless they look soiled. They never smell.

    Can I also ask how URESHII DESIGN's finish their seams and hems?

    Do you have a favorite garment shape from them?

    Leave a comment:


  • PaulT00
    replied
    As a spectacle wearer since around my 7th birthday, it's taken a long time but I have settled on two favourite spectacle brands: Lunor and Lindberg. Some people may recognise the late Steve Jobs' favourite spectacles, the Lunor "Classic Round" design. Lunor are a small, quirky company based in the Black Forest, making some classic - often vintage-styled - handmade spectacle frames in everything from acetate to titanium or gold; Lindberg are from Denmark - a much larger company, whose signature is the use of ultra-lightweight titanium, often with acetate elements, and very sharp designs. Both make some superb superb spectacle frames, with very high quality; I currently own 4 Lunor frames and a single Lindberg, but I have my eye on at least two more Lindbergs and am currently engaged in a discussion with my optician about another pair of specs with an updated prescription for screen use... because I spend all day every day, pretty much, in front of a computer. Presbyopia, especially combined with astigmatism, is a nuisance!

    My lenses are from Seiko, their progressive lenses are superb.

    I love my Scarpa boots and shoes (also mentioned earlier by gqb) - there's a pair of Terra GTX waterproof boots which are fantastic for walking with the dogs in muddy conditions, or on the beach in winter, and I also have a pair of their excellent waterproof walking shoes which look like technical trainers.

    As far as pens are concerned, I'm a big fountain pen user. My favourites are long out of production, but can still be easily found on the used market - many have been restored, even unrestored examples are often still in full working condition needing just a good flush and a fresh fill of ink: the amazing Parker '51', launched nearly 80 years ago and still one of the finest writing instruments ever made. They're not flashy, but were designed as a high-end workhorse of a pen back in the days before ballpoints took over the world - and the sheer number of them still around bears out the fundamental solidity of the design. For minimum fuss and bother, the slightly later Aero-metric filling system just works and is often still fully operational even on pens considerably older than the mid-50s I'll admit to.

    Kitchen knives: a 6" Global knife (no idea which model!) which I bought 20 years ago has been heavily used - but looked after - and is still our go-to kitchen knife for just about everything except peeling root veg. I got it when I was living in digs in London, then it came home 8 years later. These days my partner does a lot of the cooking, but also somehow ends up using the same knife, out of the half dozen on the knife rack, almost all the time...

    And you can count me in as another big fan of Tilley hats - I currently own 4 and rotate between them depending on the season!

    Leave a comment:


  • Ms. Ferret
    replied
    Originally posted by BWeaves View Post
    Can people who have bought from URESHII DESIGN comment on the different fabrics they use? What's your favorite (or non-favorite) and why?
    My favorites for colder months are the Pure Merino and Sweater Merino. The Pure Merino is very fine 100% merino, I love it because it is soft, drapes well, and does not get smelly (as expected from 100% merino). Possible TMI: I generally only wash my Pure Merino tops if I get something on them.

    The Sweater Merino is a newer offering, it's thick and plush and VERY soft and squishy. It's 30% merino and 70% lyocell, so I have to actually wash it now and then, but I can get quite a few wearings out of this fabric between washings as well.

    In the warmer months I also love their Slub fabric. It's soft, extremely lightweight, and packable -- great for light summer cardigans. I also like the Hemp fabric for summer, as it's a thick, but loose, fabric.

    The Bamboo rayon is also lovely and soft, and comes in many more colors than the merino offerings. I've worn this fabric in warm and cold weather with equal success. The Bamboo French Terry is also very soft and warm, great for lounge pants.

    I generally don't get things in the Stretch Merino, since it's not as soft and comfortable as the Pure Merino or Sweater Merino in my opinion -- I prefer to just go for the Bamboo if I need something stretchy, or the Pure Merino if I don't need something stretchy.

    Leave a comment:

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