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Brands and Stuff That You Love (Emphasis on Quality)

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  • BWeaves
    replied
    Can people who have bought from URESHII DESIGN comment on the different fabrics they use? What's your favorite (or non-favorite) and why?

    Leave a comment:


  • Buffalonian
    replied
    I love my WOOL & PRINCE merino shirts. https://woolandprince.com/ ... The quality of the fabric is superb, and the dark blue button down I bought is the most beautiful shirt I've ever owned. (I also have three long-sleeve henleys, a polo, two t-shirts, and a heavier piece somewhat akin to a sweater.)

    Leave a comment:


  • Lami
    replied
    Originally posted by Skirata44 View Post
    I'm kind of surprised Buff hasn't been mentioned yet here. I have one of their merino neck gaiters and it's just absolutely phenomenal. They pack down to pretty much nothing, so you can take them anywhere, and they're surprisingly warm no matter how you wear them-and there's tons of ways to wear them. Great product.
    I really like my merino buff. I bring it on every single trip, as I can use it for a few different purposes. Besides the obvious as a scarf or neck warmer, it is my eye mask on flights (and keeps my ears warm on the flight, as a bonus.)

    Leave a comment:


  • Skirata44
    replied
    I'm kind of surprised Buff hasn't been mentioned yet here. I have one of their merino neck gaiters and it's just absolutely phenomenal. They pack down to pretty much nothing, so you can take them anywhere, and they're surprisingly warm no matter how you wear them-and there's tons of ways to wear them. Great product.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ms. Ferret
    replied
    Some favorites of mine that I don't think I've seen yet:
    • URESHII DESIGN - I first heard about this two-woman Canadian company here on the forums. I've bought a bunch of made-to-measure merino clothing from them since then, and it has all been 100% beautiful and perfect.
    • SCARF SHOP - gorgeous hand-dyed scarves in cotton, wool, or cashmere. My current favorite thing from them is a cashmere shawl in an aggressively high-vis neon pink. Expensive, but they occasionally do sales, and they often sell slightly imperfect stuff for 40% off.
    • PIGGLEDEE - Etsy seller who makes super useful, super adorable things. I'm a huge fan of her insulated snack bags (perfect for holding uninsulated steel lunch containers) and food-safe utensil cases (seen here)

    • CIELO pill cases, made in the USA. Highly functional, and very cute and compact.
    • I've bought DAZZLE DOT adhesive lipstick mirrors over and over again, and have given them to everyone I know who wears lipstick. Such a simple idea, but I hate not having these on my lipsticks now.

    Leave a comment:


  • BigBadD
    replied
    Had not heard of or personally experienced such Pyrex issues - but clearly a concern! My own positive daily use is mainly as mixing bowls and measuring jugs, rather than oven use.

    Leave a comment:


  • Generic Industries
    replied
    Yikes! Exploding glass is no good. I haven't had anything go wrong but those scenarios are scary enough to strike it from the "recommended" list!

    Leave a comment:


  • GrussGott
    replied
    Originally posted by G42 View Post
    wow, interesting - it's exactly what happened to me, taking it out of the oven and BOOM! and it DEFINITELY exploded (and it was pyrex) - there was glass ON TOP of 5 foot high things 10 feet away!

    Freaked me out enough that I'm steel or aluminum only now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wanderlust77
    replied
    Originally posted by GrussGott View Post
    Complete side note, but I had a pyrex container I've been using for years in the oven with only garbanzo beans in it roasting at 350. Took it out and was turning to set it on the island behind me and the dish literally exploded! there was glass everywhere, including in my hair - i was lucky I wasn't injured.

    Anyway, not sure if it was user or error or mean time-to-failure (I've been using that dish for that purpose for years), but word to the wise!
    That happened to me with a Pyrex 4-cup measure a couple years ago. I always used it to make tea for iced tea, but the last time I started to pour the boiling water in, it exploded in little shards all over my kitchen. No injuries, just a mess to clean up, but it sure did startle me! I replaced it with another and, so far, so good��

    Leave a comment:


  • G42
    replied
    Originally posted by GrussGott View Post
    Complete side note, but I had a pyrex container I've been using for years in the oven with only garbanzo beans in it roasting at 350. Took it out and was turning to set it on the island behind me and the dish literally exploded! there was glass everywhere, including in my hair - i was lucky I wasn't injured.

    Anyway, not sure if it was user or error or mean time-to-failure (I've been using that dish for that purpose for years), but word to the wise!
    You might find this interesting

    https://gizmodo.com/the-pyrex-glass-...die-1833040962

    Leave a comment:


  • GrussGott
    replied
    Originally posted by BigBadD View Post
    The Pyrex suggestion is a great one. Used almost everyday, but somewhat taken for granted.
    Complete side note, but I had a pyrex container I've been using for years in the oven with only garbanzo beans in it roasting at 350. Took it out and was turning to set it on the island behind me and the dish literally exploded! there was glass everywhere, including in my hair - i was lucky I wasn't injured.

    Anyway, not sure if it was user or error or mean time-to-failure (I've been using that dish for that purpose for years), but word to the wise!

    Leave a comment:


  • BigBadD
    replied
    The Pyrex suggestion is a great one. Used almost everyday, but somewhat taken for granted.

    Leave a comment:


  • Generic Industries
    replied
    Hello, all. I'm late to the thread but I'm glad to have found it. There are definitely some manufacturers here that are new to me! Thanks for everyone's input and insight.

    I thought I'd add a few suggestions of my own.

    And a note up front: With a lot of these companies and companies others have mentioned it's always a good idea to get in touch when something breaks, wears out, or doesn't perform as expected. You'd be surprised what quality gear companies can do for you!

    Jandd Mountaineering
    Quality specialty bags, worth checking out for cycling gear especially. Panniers, rollers, handle bar bags, bike frame bags. Lifetime guarantee, lots of colors, reasonable prices.

    Steele Canvas
    Excellent US-made canvas totes, trolleys and bushel baskets.

    Occidental Leather
    The ultimate leather tool belt company. All products are made in the US (California, I think). They have a nice line of nylon belts and pouches that are robust and affordable. I work in construction, these are premium belts. I'd recommend you check them out if you're looking for a decent set of bags for a weekend project or if you do occasional carpentry and haven't found the right set of bags just yet.

    Berkeley Point
    Stainless hardware and components for home, garden, aviation and sailing. Hooks, clips, hasps, rings, shackles, hinges, etc! If you're into NiteIze style carabiners and clips give these a look.

    Wheeler Monroe
    Find them on Etsy. Tool belts for gardeners, florists and others in need of keeping tools close at hand. All made in North Carolina, USA.

    Starrett
    Fine US-made marking and measuring tools: rules, dividers, calipers, micrometers, squares, trammels.

    Kennedy
    Classic matte-brown tool boxes and tool chests for machinists and mechanics. These are best picked up used at yard sales and craigslist.

    Blundstone
    The now-ubiquitous brown boot has always served me well. We've been through half a dozen pairs in our household and all have been well worth the price of admission. We stick to the basic all-leather models.

    AO Eyeware, Inc.
    Classic aviator glasses. The "original pilot" glasses were used by astronauts during the Apollo program. Reasonable prices, made in the US. Can you say "polarized glass lenses"?

    A note on Smartwool
    I've noticed a few comments about Smartwool products throughout the thread. I've had a few pairs of merino tights, several 150 and 250 baselayer shirts and a few pairs of socks. All have help up pretty well, the shirts especially. I always take care to wash on gentle and to air dry on a clothes horse.

    When their stuff has worn out and I sent it back. Let's just say they've been generous.

    I love wearing merino, I find it's great at regulating my body temperature and very comfortable. I don't just wear it when I'm on an excursion in the cold. I wear Smartwool layers practically everyday: to work, to sleep, as a baselayer practically all winter. I get so acclimated that cotton feels like chain mail when I switch back.

    Pyrex
    How about a shout out for everyday US-made kitchenware available practically everywhere? Sturdy glass beakers and big glass bowls for mixing and measuring.

    Leatherman
    Excellent multitools and customer service. I carry a Wave. A few years back I picked up an original Leatherman PST at a flea market for $2.00 that needed some TLC. The pliers didn't work. I sent it out to Leatherman and they returned it back to me good as new. I think I only paid shipping.

    Amaroq
    Makers of beautiful aluminum dustpans. That's right – dustpans! Nicely stamped edges stay flat to the floor. Very similar to the big aluminum pans you find at most hardware stores but better made and better looking. US-made.

    Darn Tough
    They've been mentioned here but I'll go ahead and add that they've always done right by me!

    Patagonia
    A few people have spoken up for Patagonia already. I say great products and customer service. Good warranties, good replacement and repair program. I've found busted Patagonia stuff at the thrift store that I've sent in for repairs! I've got... a lot of their stuff. Mostly picked up used!

    Carhartt
    Has Carhartt been mentioned here? For the price and durability they are really tough to beat. Some of the classic designs like the double-front dungarees, duck pants, sandstone hooded jackets are hard wearing and last a really long time.

    Tilley
    I know they've been mentioned. I got a Tilley Outback ten years ago and it's still looking good. I wore it while working summers on an organic produce farm and still use it in hard rain or when I'm outside in the summer. Durable, hold their shape, retain water repellency, handsome, etc. Haven't sent one in but the label inside says they'll replace it if it wears out.
    Last edited by Generic Industries; 02-29-2020, 09:55 AM. Reason: Poor editing, dropped pronouns, latent ideas

    Leave a comment:


  • Fox
    replied
    Good brands: Patagonia (jackets, fleeces and capilene t-shirts), Arc'teryx (coats, fleeces), Stance (socks and t-shirts), Supernatural (merino wool t-shirts), Lululemon (trousers fit really well, free hemming; and the silver tech t-shirts are good as well), On Running (shoes), Hoka One One (shoes) EDIT oo and Alex Mill: wonderful basics and pieces that will last forever. & Tracksmith: best brand I've ever found for running gear because they're ridiculously comfortable and long-lasting.

    Bad/not great brands: Smartwool (t-shirts and socks; they just lost shape and didn't meet my expectations), Allbirds (shoes; really hurt my heels, wanted to love them, but just can't), Organic Basics (again, wanted to love them, but I feel as though their products were over-priced and did not fit well at all).

    Finally, just a quick caveat for people wanting to be more sustainable, especially to do with animal welfare, more specifically to do with down products. Try to source sustainably, specifically through RDS (Responsible Down Standard): this does still mean that animals die, it just means it is done ethically (no live plucking etc.), if you want a down alternative, then go synthetic (Patagonia and Arc'teryx make great jackets: Micro-puff and Atom LT respectively), you still get the micro plastics and everything, but it's about weighing up everything and what you're more happy with.
    Last edited by Fox; 02-18-2020, 05:59 PM. Reason: Forgot a brand

    Leave a comment:


  • SarahJaneMakes
    replied
    I recently came across recommendations for the NiteIze Quickstand. It's a credit card-sized stand that is compatible with most phones and tablets. I wasn't super convinced of its efficacy but it's low price (found mine for $9 at REI https://tinyurl.com/w4eb9sk) and local availability pushed me to try it. Totally love it. It's tiny, actually the size of a credit card so it's always at hand. Stable. Lightweight. Lots of angles and useful in both portrait and landscape mode.

    When I bring my Logitech Keys-to-go I can pretty much leave my laptop at home or the office and have all the comfort of full keyboard typing. You can get up to 3 months between charges (Based on 2 hours average usage per day) says the product description. In my experience with light use I've gotten nearly a year's use with a single charge and light, occasional usage.

    Leave a comment:

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