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Travel Kitchen

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  • G42
    replied
    melhoune Cristina

    I'm in the food industry...you can dig around online to find this all out but it may take you a while to get all the info....so, maybe more than you want to know...

    Generally speaking, the olive oil will be fine in a food grade PET or HDPE container, as long as you use something of Nalgene quality for leak proof. The type of leaching you may have heard about is from the type of plastic called PVC - you wouldn't want to use it for most food of this type regardless.

    If you're concerned about BPA, choose a container that is free of intended BPA - it should be easy to find now in Europe & the US.
    For packaged food sold in California there is a law mandating BPA disclosure, so most food companies that sell in the US have eliminated BPA from all their packaging OR they disclose it on the package, so that they aren't making two different versions (ie, CA & non-CA).

    Edible food oils need protection from oxygen and light. They won't make the food unsafe but they will change the flavor (oxidation rancidity).
    Oil is commercially packaged today in darkly coloured PET by several companies. PET has high clarity (basically, it looks nicer). There are metal cans with thin plastic based interior coatings that are also fine. Glass is fine. Buy only what you can use within a year or so for best taste.

    If you're buying a container to put food into, be sure it's labeled/sold as food grade and note whether it can be heated/frozen or not. For the oil, pick PET, HDPE, lined metal sold for oil, or glass.
    Glass is basically chemically inert and is an excellent oxygen barrier...but it's not a light barrier, is heavy, and fragile.
    Lined metal is very good oxygen barrier, excellent light barrier, less heavy, less fragile.
    The plastics are ok to good oxygen barriers & light barriers depending on type and colour, lightweight, and less fragile.
    Pick the one that works for whatever you're doing. For a travel kitchen, I'd pour in fresh oil for each trip, if you're not traveling/using constantly.
    Keep oil in a cool/room temp dark place and tightly sealed to preserve quality.


    ETA: if you want to read about Nalgene's history and why they have leakproof bottles. I toured that Rochester factory a very long time ago....

    https://www.insider.com/sc/nalgene-a...history-2019-6

    Making glass vs metal vs plastic containers is very different in terms of equipment & expertise so usually you'd only see one company doing more than one because they bought a separate company at some point.
    Last edited by G42; 08-11-2020, 03:46 PM.

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  • Cristina
    replied
    Originally posted by melhoune View Post
    Hi Cristina and thanks for this thread - super interesting. I really like how you have organized your small kitchen set. I'm like you, super fond of my spatula, i don't understand how people do without
    Just a small thing: i used to have also oil in a nalgene bottle, but i was told that it was not safe to store oil in plastic, therefore i use now a small glass bottle. You might consider just reusing the one you got as a sample. Cheers!
    Thank you for that melhoune, very helpful!

    I am wondering if the person who told you that was referring to BPA leeching into the contents of a plastic bottle? Nalgene went BPA-free a few years ago so I think these should be ok if that was the reason, but it’s always a good idea to be aware of safe food storage!

    I wish Nalgene would apply their expertise to non-plastic bottles; it would be great to have a little set of strengthened glass or metal containers. I’m wary of the plastic-lined aluminum ones though.


    Right now my little Nalgenes are still empty but I will make sure to empty and clean them instead of letting the oil sit. Thanks again!

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  • melhoune
    replied
    Hi Cristina and thanks for this thread - super interesting. I really like how you have organized your small kitchen set. I'm like you, super fond of my spatula, i don't understand how people do without
    Just a small thing: i used to have also oil in a nalgene bottle, but i was told that it was not safe to store oil in plastic, therefore i use now a small glass bottle. You might consider just reusing the one you got as a sample. Cheers!

    Leave a comment:


  • Cristina
    replied
    Originally posted by nessagr View Post
    Cristina, what do you use the spatulas for? I'm especially intrigued because you have two of them...
    At home, I use mini spatulas nearly every time I prepare food. I use them instead of other utensils. I prefer them for spreading softened butter or jam on toast. I love how easy they are to maneuver in a frying pan. I use the ones with the thinnest edges to flip pancakes or slices of eggplant. I use them to pull every bit of jam or yogurt out of the container. I use them to get every bit of dressing out of the bowl I’ve used to make it. I scrape batter off the sides of mixing bowls when I bake. I sometimes make a brownie or chocolate cake recipe that is mixed in a non-stick saucepan so these are great for mixing and stirring on those easily-scratched surfaces. I prefer spoon shaped ones with a nice thin edge. My favorite one is that but also has an angled point.

    Also I don’t like the clinking noise of metal utensils and dishes so the quiet of a spatula is a nice bonus, and my spoons have very heavy handles that will sometimes cause smaller lighter containers to tip over.

    I got these in a pack of five (all different) and I love them so very much.

    Leave a comment:


  • nessagr
    replied
    Cristina, what do you use the spatulas for? I'm especially intrigued because you have two of them...

    Leave a comment:


  • Cristina
    replied
    Yikes, so sorry carrot!! I’ll test future utensils on radishes instead [emoji23]
    G42 I’ve just ordered a set of those Fozzil dishes, thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • G42
    replied
    carrot I'm sure spearing you with a plastic fork is against the Forum guidelines

    there are other companies that make various types of flat-fold/snap together polypropylene items...
    I don't have these, but have something similar that I leave in one of my emergency kits
    https://www.fozzils.com/solo-pack-mist

    theoretically you could also make custom sizes if you find thick PP sheets and plastic snaps/rivets at craft or DIY shops

    Leave a comment:


  • carrot
    replied
    Originally posted by Cristina View Post
    able to spear carrot pieces in a salad
    Ouch.

    All jokes aside this is great and your travel kitchen setup is really nice. I am still working out what my travel kitchen should be, as it's a major work-in-progress that I expect I'll be refining for awhile.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cristina
    replied
    Originally posted by sturbridge View Post
    Cristina- on the left side - what is that in the middle underneath the tins and above the Nalgene bottles? You mention utensils, but I can't quite make them out.
    It is called Unitensil. It’s a flexible, folding double ended fork/spoon/knife. Because it’s thin and flexible it isn’t able to spear carrot pieces in a salad but it is great for scooping or for softer items. It folds flat width wise and folds lengthwise and snaps shut for use.



    The website is a bit weird but I think it works better from inside the US:
    UNITENSIL 1

    Leave a comment:


  • sturbridge
    replied
    Cristina- on the left side - what is that in the middle underneath the tins and above the Nalgene bottles? You mention utensils, but I can't quite make them out.
    Last edited by sturbridge; 07-26-2020, 02:41 PM.

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  • Cristina
    replied
    So, I’ve tried my setup in the Spiff Kit (Standard and Deluxe) and the HLT2. I definitely prefer the Spiff Kits because all of the pockets are 3D. The flatter half of the HLT2 just didn’t work for my stuff.

    Here are pics of my Travel Kitchen setup in a Standard Spiff Kit.

    Everything neatly away:



    On the left, two tea tins (one for caffeinated tea, one for herbal), folding multi-utensils, and one and two ounce Nalgene bottles for vinegar and olive oil.

    In the middle sitting on the mirror, some random salt and pepper packets and a Sheffield made fruit knife with cover.

    On the right, a GSI Outdoor travel spice container, two mini spatulas, a collapsible tea strainer, a travel size of dish soap and a burlap dish scrubbie.




    I originally picked up this set of mini olive oils for trips but with all my trips cancelled for the foreseeable, I decided to just use them up before they went bad instead. But here they are anyway. They each hold 25ml, and the one ounce bottle holds about 30ml and the two ounce about 60ml.

    Leave a comment:


  • sturbridge
    replied
    I'm thinking the sm snake charmer might be good for my needs.
    At one point I used a small snake charmer as a breakfast kit. One side had tea/coffee and immersion heater, the other side had collapsible bowls, spoons and instant oatmeal packets.

    Leave a comment:


  • nessagr
    replied
    Originally posted by Cristina View Post
    What do you think you’ll put in your travel kitchen? I’m building mine around what annoys me when we stay somewhere.
    Nothing you haven't thought of!
    I'm thinking for mostly day-to-day, full-sized butter knife, fork, and spoon, reusable drinking straws, cloth napkin, salt and pepper, disinfecting wipes and hand sanitizer, army knife, 3-4 creamer containers in a plastic bag, tea, a reusable shopping bag.

    For family car trips, I would add more cutlery and napkins, a med OP with a small cutting board, small collapsable colander, and a paring knife.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cristina
    replied
    Originally posted by nessagr View Post
    You've gotten me thinking about how much I need a travel kitchen for whenever I leave the house again! I'm interested in your assessment of these two- I'm thinking the sm snake charmer might be good for my needs.
    What do you think you’ll put in your travel kitchen? I’m building mine around what annoys me when we stay somewhere.

    Leave a comment:


  • carrot
    replied
    Originally posted by sturbridge View Post
    I just got this one- it folds up to about 2" thick and 5 1/2" across. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I also have an immersion heater, that takes up even less room, but then you have to have access to a cup to use it.
    I ordered one of these (the Gourmia GK338B Electric Collapsible Travel Kettle) based on your recommendation. I'm so excited to try it out!

    Leave a comment:

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