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Travel Kitchen

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  • TRD
    replied
    I've never gone full travel kitchen but I always have a travel utensil set with me including a spoon, fork, butterish knife (cuts but is not sharp), chopsticks and a reusable straw. Muji, one of my favorite stores has small stuff. It looks great and are easy to clean.

    https://www.muji.us/store/maple-chop...182088427.html

    https://www.muji.us/store/4549738726722.html

    https://www.muji.us/store/4549738726715.html

    Weirdly it's not the travel stuff that bugs me it's the lack of cleaning items. So along with my travel utensils I have a cut bit of sponge and a travel size Palmolive dish soap container I liberated from a timeshare I was trying out. Comes in handy all the time. As long as I can reclean whatever is being offered so I know for certain it's Dana-clean I'm okay.
    Last edited by TRD; 11-15-2020, 06:28 PM.

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  • bbcamp
    replied
    Yes, it is comfortable, or comfortable enough to use. remember that one uses very little force when one drags the blade through the slot. It helps to sit the sharpener on a table to hold it steady.

    Leave a comment:


  • bbcamp
    replied
    This is the latest one I bought, I have a couple: https://www.amazon.com/Smiths-PP1-Po...%2C231&sr=8-14

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  • bbcamp
    replied
    I usually carry a small sharpener in my travel toolkit. They are very light. But thanks for the mug-bottom tip!

    Leave a comment:


  • Cristina
    replied
    Originally posted by smudge View Post
    My pet rental kitchen annoyance are the invariably blunt kitchen knives. Unfortunately packing a kitchen knife on a flight won't work. But I am considering a small sharpener - wonder if anyone packs one in their kitchen kit?
    I have suffered this problem many times, and I’ve even gone out and bought knives on longer vacations. Then I learned a GREAT trick for rentals. Sharpen dull knives on the bottom of any mug. The rough, unglazed ceramic ring on the bottom of a mug acts like a sharpening stone:

    https://www.seriouseats.com/2017/09/...-on-a-mug.html

    Leave a comment:


  • smudge
    replied
    Originally posted by Cristina View Post
    What do you think you’ll put in your travel kitchen? I’m building mine around what annoys me when we stay somewhere.
    My pet rental kitchen annoyance are the invariably blunt kitchen knives. Unfortunately packing a kitchen knife on a flight won't work. But I am considering a small sharpener - wonder if anyone packs one in their kitchen kit?

    Leave a comment:


  • sturbridge
    replied
    Inspired by this thread (and having used my travel kitchen last weekend while visiting family) I decided I needed an upgrade to my spices. I found these heat sealable mylar bags that hold about a teaspoon of product and filled them with my most used Penzey's spices. I have 8 of them in a tin that is a little larger than an Altoids tin.

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  • nessagr
    replied
    Originally posted by Cristina View Post
    nessagr What a great idea, I never thought of the CQPC! This week is pretty hectic but since I needed more 3D space than I originally thought, I would like to try this. I think it would work since I don’t really need things to be supremely compartmentalized, and many things in the kit are kind of bulky even though they’re small. Thanks!

    Edited to add:
    I am delighted to say that all the kitchen stuff pictured in my post above fits in just one side of the CQPC! I am very excited about this because it means that if I needed to, I could pack a cutting board and dishtowel and some sort of extra cutlery and/or collapsible bowls without really taking up much more room in my travel bag.

    Thanks again!
    That's great! The CQPC holds so much. I have a lot I want to add and I'm sure it will be able to carry it all.
    The thanks goes to you for the original idea. Having all these things in one place is going to be super helpful when we start doing family road trips again.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cristina
    replied
    Travel Kitchen

    Originally posted by nessagr View Post
    After getting the small snake charmer and a CQPC, I realized the CQPC was actually a better option for my travel kitchen because it holds my travel cutting board. I still need to get a travel colander (I'm thinking this one https://www.kuhnrikonshop.com/silico...KHN+M2161.html), salt and pepper shakers and something for oil and vinegar. The bag I'm using to hold the creamers takes up a lot of room, so I'll probably keep less in there in a smaller bag. I'm also still sewing up a utensil holder/ napkin for my daughter's set, which is bigger than the others, but there's plenty of room for four here.
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]24991[/ATTACH]
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    nessagr What a great idea, I never thought of the CQPC! This week is pretty hectic but since I needed more 3D space than I originally thought, I would like to try this. I think it would work since I don’t really need things to be supremely compartmentalized, and many things in the kit are kind of bulky even though they’re small. Thanks!

    Edited to add:
    I am delighted to say that all the kitchen stuff pictured in my post above fits in just one side of the CQPC! I am very excited about this because it means that if I needed to, I could pack a cutting board and dishtowel and some sort of extra cutlery and/or collapsible bowls without really taking up much more room in my travel bag.

    Thanks again!
    Last edited by Cristina; 08-25-2020, 02:54 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • nessagr
    replied
    After getting the small snake charmer and a CQPC, I realized the CQPC was actually a better option for my travel kitchen because it holds my travel cutting board. I still need to get a travel colander (I'm thinking this one https://www.kuhnrikonshop.com/silico...KHN+M2161.html), salt and pepper shakers and something for oil and vinegar. The bag I'm using to hold the creamers takes up a lot of room, so I'll probably keep less in there in a smaller bag. I'm also still sewing up a utensil holder/ napkin for my daughter's set, which is bigger than the others, but there's plenty of room for four here.
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  • Cristina
    replied
    Originally posted by G42 View Post
    It's semi related, because it's similar materials....those bowls are food grade polypropylene, a common packaging plastic.
    From their FAQ: "Of course, the material can be damaged by cutting, or exposing it to an open flame, but under normal use it is flexible and virtually unbreakable."

    So you physically can cut on them, many cutting boards are polyprop, but I would avoid it because as they say, it will damage them over time. The bowls aren't super expensive, but you will inevitably start micro slicing the plastic. Over time that will weaken them and they'll start to fail sooner than otherwise. I'd want to maximize their lifespan before disposing/recycling. The other big deal is that microbes hide in nooks and crannies, so the more cut up and the deeper the slices over time, the harder it is to clean. When you return from a trip and have used them, I would run them through the dishwasher, if you have one, though hand washing done correctly is perfectly fine.

    Ideally, you replace your plastic cutting boards relatively frequently, depending on how sliced up they get.
    You can also buy a high quality solid wood board and then sand it down occasionally.

    US Amazon, but a set like this would make a lot of mini boards
    https://www.amazon.com/Flexible-Plas.../dp/B01HN7ZGUQ

    So for a mini traveling kitchen, where size & weight are concerns, I would go for an inexpensive single (or set) of the flexible cutting boards cut up into multiple miniboards. Just replace one mini board with a new one after they get worn down.
    Finding a small 'bartender' size solid wood board would also be an option, but heavier, thicker, and you may not find one the right size. But theoretically you could sand it down to extend it's life and/or compost it, burn it in your next campfire, etc (as long as it's real wood).
    A small tempered glass cutting board would work too, but I've never seen a tiny one....
    Thank you very much!

    Ah yes I don’t want to slice microplastics into my food or create books and crannies for bacteria to hide [emoji33]

    I actually have a bartenders cutting board, it came in a set of three bamboo boards. Maybe I’ll just pack that! I got it at TK Maxx (this is what TJ Maxx is called here), and as soon as the kids are back at school, I’m heading there for a browse. I’ll keep my eye out for travel kitchen items. [emoji41]

    Leave a comment:


  • G42
    replied
    Originally posted by Cristina View Post
    Well since you offered... [emoji23]

    Those Fozzil folding bowls arrived today and I put them to use collecting the blackberries we picked. I love them! Do you think that material would be sturdy enough to be used as a makeshift cutting board?

    ETA: I know this isn’t packaging related but I know you have those bowls so I’m just asking anyway [emoji23]
    It's semi related, because it's similar materials....those bowls are food grade polypropylene, a common packaging plastic.
    From their FAQ: "Of course, the material can be damaged by cutting, or exposing it to an open flame, but under normal use it is flexible and virtually unbreakable."

    So you physically can cut on them, many cutting boards are polyprop, but I would avoid it because as they say, it will damage them over time. The bowls aren't super expensive, but you will inevitably start micro slicing the plastic. Over time that will weaken them and they'll start to fail sooner than otherwise. I'd want to maximize their lifespan before disposing/recycling. The other big deal is that microbes hide in nooks and crannies, so the more cut up and the deeper the slices over time, the harder it is to clean. When you return from a trip and have used them, I would run them through the dishwasher, if you have one, though hand washing done correctly is perfectly fine.

    Ideally, you replace your plastic cutting boards relatively frequently, depending on how sliced up they get.
    You can also buy a high quality solid wood board and then sand it down occasionally.

    US Amazon, but a set like this would make a lot of mini boards
    https://www.amazon.com/Flexible-Plas.../dp/B01HN7ZGUQ

    So for a mini traveling kitchen, where size & weight are concerns, I would go for an inexpensive single (or set) of the flexible cutting boards cut up into multiple miniboards. Just replace one mini board with a new one after they get worn down.
    Finding a small 'bartender' size solid wood board would also be an option, but heavier, thicker, and you may not find one the right size. But theoretically you could sand it down to extend it's life and/or compost it, burn it in your next campfire, etc (as long as it's real wood).
    A small tempered glass cutting board would work too, but I've never seen a tiny one....
    Last edited by G42; 08-14-2020, 05:11 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cristina
    replied
    Travel Kitchen

    Originally posted by G42 View Post
    Hello, my name is G42 and I'll be your Packaging Geek today, how many I help you?
    Well since you offered... [emoji23]

    Those Fozzil folding bowls arrived today and I put them to use collecting the blackberries we picked. I love them! Do you think that material would be sturdy enough to be used as a makeshift cutting board?

    ETA: I know this isn’t packaging related but I know you have those bowls so I’m just asking anyway [emoji23]

    Leave a comment:


  • G42
    replied
    Originally posted by Cristina View Post
    Wow G42 thank you!!! Thanks for letting us tap into your IRL expertise [emoji41]
    Hello, my name is G42 and I'll be your Packaging Geek today, how many I help you?

    Leave a comment:


  • Cristina
    replied
    Originally posted by G42 View Post
    melhoune Cristina

    I'm in the food industry...you can dig around online to find this all out but it may take you a while to get all the info....so, maybe more than you want to know...

    Generally speaking, the olive oil will be fine in a food grade PET or HDPE container, as long as you use something of Nalgene quality for leak proof. The type of leaching you may have heard about is from the type of plastic called PVC - you wouldn't want to use it for most food of this type regardless.

    If you're concerned about BPA, choose a container that is free of intended BPA - it should be easy to find now in Europe & the US.
    For packaged food sold in California there is a law mandating BPA disclosure, so most food companies that sell in the US have eliminated BPA from all their packaging OR they disclose it on the package, so that they aren't making two different versions (ie, CA & non-CA).

    Edible food oils need protection from oxygen and light. They won't make the food unsafe but they will change the flavor (oxidation rancidity).
    Oil is commercially packaged today in darkly coloured PET by several companies. PET has high clarity (basically, it looks nicer). There are metal cans with thin plastic based interior coatings that are also fine. Glass is fine. Buy only what you can use within a year or so for best taste.

    If you're buying a container to put food into, be sure it's labeled/sold as food grade and note whether it can be heated/frozen or not. For the oil, pick PET, HDPE, lined metal sold for oil, or glass.
    Glass is basically chemically inert and is an excellent oxygen barrier...but it's not a light barrier, is heavy, and fragile.
    Lined metal is very good oxygen barrier, excellent light barrier, less heavy, less fragile.
    The plastics are ok to good oxygen barriers & light barriers depending on type and colour, lightweight, and less fragile.
    Pick the one that works for whatever you're doing. For a travel kitchen, I'd pour in fresh oil for each trip, if you're not traveling/using constantly.
    Keep oil in a cool/room temp dark place and tightly sealed to preserve quality.


    ETA: if you want to read about Nalgene's history and why they have leakproof bottles. I toured that Rochester factory a very long time ago....

    https://www.insider.com/sc/nalgene-a...history-2019-6

    Making glass vs metal vs plastic containers is very different in terms of equipment & expertise so usually you'd only see one company doing more than one because they bought a separate company at some point.
    Wow G42 thank you!!! Thanks for letting us tap into your IRL expertise [emoji41]

    Leave a comment:

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