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Tri-Star

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  • Frank II
    replied
    Originally posted by blackfungi View Post
    cable ties.
    Or as Tom Bihn calls them.....STRAPEEZ

    Leave a comment:


  • blackfungi
    replied
    cable ties.

    Leave a comment:


  • Just
    replied
    If someone wants your stuff bad enough, they can just take the whole bag in the 1/2 a second you're distracted, as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • GaryS
    replied
    I thought I should add:

    Please do not construe my remarks above as a condemnation of Tom Bihn bags. Coil zippers are ubiquitous in the luggage industry and have their advantages as well as disadvantages. I own a Tom Bihn Aeronaut that is, in my opinion, the finest designed carry on luggage available in the world today. I also realize that if anyone wants into it bad enough all they need is a ball point pen. I can live with that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Maria
    replied
    Couldn't help but comment on the advice given regarding theft. Frank II - excellent points. Nothing is guaranteed, but if your things are more trouble for the thieves compared to the next guy - well it's obvious which one they will go for.

    As much as I like the Tri-Star, I'm not keen about easy access to the zippered compartments when it is in back-pack mode and out of your sight. Although I feel this way with most any back pack.

    - always keep valuables on you and hopefully out of site
    - passport and credit card will save the day when all else is lost
    - copy of passport and credit card info / consulate numbers, emergency info can be scanned and sent to your own e-mail address.
    - the less you carry, the faster you can move. Know your surrounding area, or at least look like you do.
    - be discreet, no flashy designer labels. Camera bag that doesn't have the logo on the outside of the bag, nor on the strap around your neck etc.

    I've been lucky, but that doesn't mean I haven't been a target. A friend had her expensive watch cut off of her wrist (while wearing a blouse and suit jacket!) while standing in a crowded elevator...the lift was too crowded and the thief couldn't bend down the pick it up off the floor! I wondered - how could you not feel such? But it can happen. If they are professionals - you won't know it until you search for the now missing item.

    Cheers!

    Leave a comment:


  • GaryS
    replied
    Originally posted by Frank II View Post
    You really think it's easier to stick a pen into a zipper, open it, and then try to close it when the pulls are locked than to open a twist tie?
    Whether or not it is colsed back up I was trying to illustrate how easy it is to get into a cloth bag with coil zippers.

    Originally posted by Frank II View Post
    Pickpockets are opportunists. They look for the easiest mark, the easiest bag to get into. If you make it difficult for them, they're going to move on the someone easier. They don't see bags as "challenges."
    What could be easier than a bag with coil zippers that can be opened with a ball point pen?

    Originally posted by Frank II View Post
    Sorry, but locks have proven to deter theft. It just takes too long in public to try to get into them.
    But it just takes seconds to bypass them and go straight to the zipper.

    Originally posted by Frank II View Post
    Twist ties will also deter but can be opened much faster than a locked case.
    I use the twist ties to keep the zipper sliders from separating when the bag is moved around.
    Originally posted by Frank II View Post
    Nothing is 100% fool proof.
    On that we agree.

    Originally posted by Frank II View Post
    How much experience do you have with this? I'm a certified travel goods specialist who has had training in luggage theft deterrence?
    I've been to seminars given by former professional pickpockets and thieves.
    I'm happy for you.

    Originally posted by Frank II View Post
    But you can believe whatever you want.
    True

    Leave a comment:


  • Frank II
    replied
    You really think it's easier to stick a pen into a zipper, open it, and then try to close it when the pulls are locked than to open a twist tie?

    Pickpockets are opportunists. They look for the easiest mark, the easiest bag to get into. If you make it difficult for them, they're going to move on the someone easier. They don't see bags as "challenges."

    Sorry, but locks have proven to deter theft. It just takes too long in public to try to get into them. Twist ties will also deter but can be opened much faster than a locked case. Nothing is 100% fool proof.

    How much experience do you have with this? I'm a certified travel goods specialist who has had training in luggage theft deterrence?

    I've been to seminars given by former professional pickpockets and thieves. The one thing they stress is the harder it is to steal something from you, the less likely you'll be a victim of theft.

    Does it guarantee that you will never be a victim...no. But by being observant and making it more difficult, the less likely your chances of being a victim. There are just too many unsecured bags around for thieves to choose from that they will tend to go towards those than ones who have added an extra obstacle.

    But you can believe whatever you want.

    Leave a comment:


  • GaryS
    replied
    Originally posted by Frank II View Post
    GaryS....are you going to do that:

    a) while I'm carrying the bag?
    b) in front of a train load of people while the bag is locked to the overhead?

    I don't think so.

    And there's only one problem to what you describe....the zippers need to move to cover up the damage. The way I describe them locked, the zippers can't be moved.

    You see, I know how to do the zipper trick and I've done it--for demonstration purposes only.

    BTW...you can do the same with the zippers of the three main compartments. Line them up, put the cord through and then wind it around the top carry handle. Zippers can't move. If zippers can't move, you can't hide the damage.
    But if your valuables are gone? My point is that coil zippers can be opened in seconds. Experienced thieves can do this in a crowd even while you are wear it! All locks and cables do is shout out to the world that there is something very valuable in your bag (whether there is or not).

    I just fasten the zipper pulls together with the little wire ties bread bags are sealed with. AND- I never let my bag out of my sight.

    Leave a comment:


  • Frank II
    replied
    GaryS....are you going to do that:

    a) while I'm carrying the bag?
    b) in front of a train load of people while the bag is locked to the overhead?

    I don't think so.

    And there's only one problem to what you describe....the zippers need to move to cover up the damage. The way I describe them locked, the zippers can't be moved.

    You see, I know how to do the zipper trick and I've done it--for demonstration purposes only.

    BTW...you can do the same with the zippers of the three main compartments. Line them up, put the cord through and then wind it around the top carry handle. Zippers can't move. If zippers can't move, you can't hide the damage.

    Leave a comment:


  • GaryS
    replied
    Originally posted by Frank II View Post
    Use a retractable lock to go through all the front zippers including the semi-circle one. That way no pocket can be opened easily
    This is a waste of time. Give me a ball point pen and five seconds and I can have any coil zipper open. The beauty of this is that afterward the zipper can be closed and it will not be damaged in any way.

    Leave a comment:


  • Frank II
    replied
    Are they that good?......yes. These are pros who have trained to do this. They are expert.

    I wouldn't do it.

    When I travel, every compartment is locked with a zipper. If it's not, I'm not worried about losing what's in it.

    Many will think I go overboard. That's fine. I've never had a problem even when I know there have been attempts.

    Now, there is one way around this. Use a retractable lock to go through all the front zippers including the semi-circle one. That way no pocket can be opened easily--but it also doesn't make anything easily accessible to you.

    The one positive--violent crime is virtually non-existent against tourists in Europe.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeffmac
    replied
    Thank you Frank and Falconea...excellent advice! I will rearrange some things.

    Frank, how do you feel about something in a pouch attached to an O ring in the front zippered pockets? Are the pick pockets good enough to foil that?

    Leave a comment:


  • Frank II
    replied
    Audrey...that's why I said the best place for a passport is a moneybelt.

    I tell people that with only a passport and a credit card you can always get home. If one of those two is missing, you're in trouble.

    Oh, and I also suggest people take a photocopy of the "info" page of their passport. And keep it separate from your passport. It will make replacing it much easier should the worst occur.

    Leave a comment:


  • falconea
    replied
    Originally posted by Frank II View Post
    But would you really want to risk one day of the short trip sitting in the U.S. consulate trying to get a replacement passport?
    When travelling I always have my passport on my person. No exceptions.

    When British Airways had that crash in London a few years ago passengers were evacuated, leaving hand luggage on board. Those who had their passports were processed and allowed to enter the country; those who didn't were held in immigration detention for several days until they were finally able to recover their hand luggage from the aircraft.

    There are many other examples available, all with the same moral: your passport must be on your person at all times.

    Similarly, on aircraft I always remain clothed, in safe fire-resistant clothing and sensible shoes. Who wants to risk nylon clothing melting on the escape slide, causing burns, and then having to run through fire on the ground in bare feet because you took your shoes off or were wearing high heels that you had to remove before using the slide? These injuries are predictable and avoidable.

    (Rant mode off.)

    Audrey

    Leave a comment:


  • Frank II
    replied
    Jeffmac, your packing list looks fine except for one thing....

    Nothing of value in those front pockets. If you can't easily replace it, don't put it there.
    Sadly, anything in any of the front pockets is easy pickings to a pickpocket. And European train stations and trains are full of them.

    (It is the one thing I don't like about the Tri-star. The front pockets cannot be locked. I only use them for 3-1-1 bag, magazine, or anything I really don't care about losing.)


    Anything of value, such as your passport, iphone, chargers, etc, should be in one of the main compartments and preferably in a pouch or cube attached to an O ring. And better yet, your passport should be in a moneybelt on the days you don't need it. (Remember, once you enter Schengen you won't need to show it when going to another Schengen country.)


    Never leave your bag unattended on a train unless it is locked to the overhead and every compartment is also locked.

    Now, people will tell you they've traveled and never had a problem (yet). I used to work in the tour industry and traveled with thousands of people. And yes, I've seen my fair share of pickpocket victims losing cameras, passports, you name it.

    You may be lucky and not have a problem. But would you really want to risk one day of the short trip sitting in the U.S. consulate trying to get a replacement passport?

    Leave a comment:

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