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How do you pack medicines, etc?

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    How do you pack medicines, etc?

    How do you store and organize medicine/vitamins etc? I have been using a small drawstring bag, but its hard to find things it in, and because everything is flopping around, I have had a few instances of caps coming off bottles. Trying to find a better solution.

    #2
    Maybe try the mesh version of a ghost whale. Or the mesh flat pouch?

    The GW has more 3D volume capabilities, which might be more suitable for a bottle of meds?

    Everything can be easily seen through the mesh

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      #3
      I store mine in a Small Travel Tray but I have also used a Cubelet and a 3D Organizer Cube. Large Travel Tray and both Snake Charmers also work well.

      Comment


        #4
        Did you mean when traveling? Back when I was traveling, I figured out something that works for me. I keep bulk meds storage in a travel tray, separate from one of those tiny evening and morning dose cases. Each morning (or evening) I transfer the day's required meds from bulk storage to the small daily unit. The bulk storage is mostly pills. I have only as many as necessary for the duration, plus few extras. They are in the smallest screw-top bottles I could find, Nalgene 70ml. I used a labelmaker to clearly identify each bottle with Rx name and dosage schedule. The little Nalgene bottles are a bit large for, say, 10-20 pills. If I can find smaller screw-tops someday, I will replace them all.

        https://nalgene.com/product/small-travel-kit/
        Last edited by Bogiesan; 09-01-2021, 10:32 AM.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Av8rMark View Post
          How do you store and organize medicine/vitamins etc? I have been using a small drawstring bag, but its hard to find things it in, and because everything is flopping around, I have had a few instances of caps coming off bottles. Trying to find a better solution.
          Originally posted by bijoux View Post
          Maybe try the mesh version of a ghost whale. Or the mesh flat pouch?

          The GW has more 3D volume capabilities, which might be more suitable for a bottle of meds?

          Everything can be easily seen through the mesh
          I use the Coyote Mesh Ghost Whale Organizer Pouches. For three bottles, the Mini GWOP will exactly fit, and conform to the shape of the contents. You can can view the pictures of my answer post #14, 10-14-2019, to someone who was asking about a bag and configuration to carry his 5 different meds in the Which bag to choose? thread started by @mrbaseball47 on 10-13-2019. Here are excerpted pictures of the Small Ghost Whale Organizer Pouch in Coyote Mesh used to hold 5 different medications (along with all the other requested carry items of phone, wallet, yogurt, cutlery, etc. in a Side Kick -- proposed for use to carry everything)
          Small Ghost Whale Organizer Pouch holding 5 meds and Side Kick

          Here's the view from the top with the GWOP left unzipped at the top so that you can see contents (not because you can't close the zipper). Please reference the original post for more detailed text information relevant to your question.
          Top view of Small Ghost Whale Organizer Pouch holding 5 medsPlease read through the entire thread. I advise packing the meds in the Coyote Mesh GWOPs because it is clear that they are prescription medications with full labeling of the contents, at the same time as the mesh interface doesn't reveal the exact label information for casual viewing. It's important to me that this information is available (especially in the case of flying, etc.). The Mini size of GWOP handles 3 of these size pill containers. For medications dispensed in huge pill containers (because the pharmacies claim they need all the space to print relevant information, as well as send out 90 day supplies). I repackage the med into the smaller vials that they used to use (original thread includes a link where you can order such empty vials that are prescription quality from Amazon, if you don't already have some of these), and I wrap the receipt copy of the prescription that CVS/Long's prints out as a duplicate copy of the adhesive label around the smaller sized vial. You can see that it looks exactly like the standard medication information through the opened Small GWOP opening. Again, this is all described later in the linked thread.

          I personally do not carry 5 meds around, so the Mini size of the Coyote Mesh GWOP works for me (two vials vertically in the pouch and one stored horizontally across the top exactly fits this pouch). Everything about dosage information and physician contact is on the label that I only switch when the bulk supply of med changes, and it only requires me to wrap the new adhesive label from the receipt copy of my filled prescription.

          HTH

          moriond

          ETA: The original thread blocks the link to Plastic Prescription Vials/Bottles 25 Pack w/Caps 8 Dram Size-New that I suggested:
          https://www.amazon.com/Plastic-Presc.../dp/B00QJAUS6G
          This gave you 25 of them for $6.95. I personally reuse my existing small bottles. You don't need to order a version with this cap, but this type won't come off.

          Last edited by moriond; 09-01-2021, 12:58 PM.

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            #6
            Ages ago, when travelling domestically, I used a Travel Tray to carry my partner's extensive collection of prescription meds - which worked pretty well. (He has COPD and a heart condition, so there are about a dozen medications/inhalers required at various intervals...) The great thing about the TT is that (1) they come in bright colours (so more difficult to forget!) and (2) they function both as an open container at destination and as a closed container (flip the top and close the drawstring) for security when actually moving. Also, there's enough structure to a TT that things don't "flop about" so much as a they might in a small drawstring bag.

            For travelling internationally, solo, a few years later, I used a Side Effect to corral my rather more limited collection of medications. One of the recommendations when travelling is to carry meds in their original packaging, another is to carry a copy of the prescription with them. So that was a total of 4 smallish cardboard packets containing the foil-strips (heart medications) and a bigger carton containing some foil-wrapped standby prescription antibiotics in case of a flare-up of a chronic condition. Having to carry the original packaging is a nuisance because it's always bulkier than just carrying e.g. a dosette box containing a sensible number of days' supply of meds "made up" - when travelling domestically these days I use a little set of stacking pill pots (from Uniqlo) with two of them per day containing morning and evening pill selections: prescription meds, vitamins and supplements. As the vitamins and supplements aren't as vital as the prescription medications, I've carried those through airports in the pill stack - nobody turned a hair.

            Wherever I'm travelling, I would always carry a sensible extra allowance of prescription meds; for a typical overnight I would always carry a couple of days' supply in case of travel delays or changes of plan. Internationally, depending on where I was going, it might be as much as a week's supply additional to what I know I'm going to use, because I can live without the stress of running out of medications!
            A45CC K CQPC 3DCCGES25 SK SCBQKTTMCBLSB TT TSS4 PCSBSCBTT CQPC PQBPQK LT SETT 3DCCQKS19 TT P3DCCTS PP BBLCBCP TTRi QK NFTD A30DLBC

            Comment


              #7
              It depends on the length of the trip, but generally I take the number of pills I'll need (plus maybe a few extras) from each bottle, and place them in a small plastic bag -- the kind that you can get from a pharmacy, an inch or two in each dimension. And label them with a sharpie. If the pills are in a blister pack I'll cut off the number I need. Thus flattened, everything can usually fit into a pouch.
              ----
              All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.
              Edmund Burke

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                #8
                I need to add one more thing. Depending on the med and your activity level, carrying a bunch of pills in a hard plastic container can, in some cases, result in some of the the pills' hard edges being bashed into a powder.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by bchaplin View Post
                  It depends on the length of the trip, but generally I take the number of pills I'll need (plus maybe a few extras) from each bottle, and place them in a small plastic bag -- the kind that you can get from a pharmacy, an inch or two in each dimension. And label them with a sharpie. If the pills are in a blister pack I'll cut off the number I need. Thus flattened, everything can usually fit into a pouch.
                  Have you ever had any problems going through airport security checks etc carrying medication that way? I have erred on the side of caution by including not only the blister strip but the outer cardboard box which has the dispensing label (details of prescription, my ID, etc) as well. Is that really necessary or have I been carrying too much packaging when I could have managed just as easily by carrying just the contents?
                  A45CC K CQPC 3DCCGES25 SK SCBQKTTMCBLSB TT TSS4 PCSBSCBTT CQPC PQBPQK LT SETT 3DCCQKS19 TT P3DCCTS PP BBLCBCP TTRi QK NFTD A30DLBC

                  Comment


                    #10
                    PaulT00 No personal issues, but if I’m carrying prescription drugs and flying internationally, I do sometimes peel off the label from the bottle and add it to the bags. I don’t remember ever being challenged on it but better safe than sorry. Lately I’m just doing road trips so it doesn’t matter.
                    ----
                    All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.
                    Edmund Burke

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I don't keep the official labels/instructions with meds when traveling within the US with small quantities.
                      For my normal allergy meds that I get at Costco in large containers, I decant some into a small 1oz Nalgene that can hold over two weeks worth

                      https://www.rei.com/product/402057/n...bottle-1-fl-oz
                      I like all the blues and greys...and all the happy citrus colours too! My search unicorn is the Sapphire Dyneema original Small Shop Bag...

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                        #12
                        For travel I carry prescription drugs and vitamins in 3" x 2" Pill Bags I picked up from Amazon, in a Mini Ghost Whale, clipped into my PLO. Prescriptions often come with little miniature sticky labels that are great for labeling these -- otherwise I just use a Sharpie.

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                          #13
                          Especially for international travel, if carrying prescription medicines it’s a wise precaution to keep original labels and also to bring your doctor’s prescription. Certain commonly prescribed medicines may be classified in other countries as narcotics, and evidence needed for usage or quantity being carried.

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