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All Inclusive List of Tips for Ultralight Packing

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    #46
    This is an old thread, but one in which I'm always on a constant quest to minimize everything. I have found better solutions and thought it would be nice to update with how I've improved upon this list.

    Originally posted by SKIMT View Post

    1. Tooth powder (I make my own but it can be purchased for cheap) - Stored in a very small ziploc style bag from any craft store Revision: This turned out to be a pain - i just use travel toothpaste now.

    2. Shaving soap - which I cut with a razor blade and jammed into an old chapstick tube - or - Shaving Oil stored in a travel size vision bottle Revision: I can shave with just the hotel bar soap. Saves the hassle and prep of this.

    3. Disposable razor (lighter and smaller than my home razor) - Still works!

    4. Shoes and/or flip flops stored in blue hospital shoe covers Still works!

    5. Storing single serving of everyday medicine (advil, dramamine, upset stomach, etc....) wrapped in aluminum foil and placed in a small ziplock bag Still works!

    6. Antibiotic ointment, hydrocortisone cream, sunscreen in single use packets or into drinking straw with melted ends
    Revision: I found REI sells these small travel / first aid kid packs of this stuff. Much easier and less messy!

    7. Substitute lotion bar (cut to the est. amount needed) versus lotion in a bottle. Revision: I just refill hotel lotion bottles. This was a pain too.

    8. Rubbing deodorant / antiperspirant / lotion / sunscreen into cosmetic cotton rounds and storing in a ziplock bag. Revision: I put the deodorant in an old lip balm tube. Thats easy. Just buy sunscreen when I get there.

    9. Taking a gallon size ziploc bag to wash socks, underwear, workout clothes after each use. Revision: I just wash clothes in the sink with the hotel shampoo.

    10. Sanitizer is put in a travel size Visine bottle. Still works!

    11. Put damp (from 90% rubbing alcohol) paper towels in a ziploc for wiping down airplane trays, and the hotel room fixtures Revision: I found they sell packs of ten or so sanitizer wipes in Target's travel section.
    New Stuff that Helps Minimalist Packing:

    Two wool briefs: wear one pair and pack another. I wash every morning after showering and wear the dry pair that day. They dry within a couple of hours.

    Two smart wool t-shirts. Same as briefs....wear, wash, dries within a couple of hours. I hesitated on Ms. Ferret's recommendation because of the cost...but they are well worth it!

    One pair of wool socks - wash every night, dry by morning.

    Patagonia/Prana travel pants - wear twice, then wash at night, dry by morning.

    On my list to still buy are long sleeve 100% wool shirts for when I have to pack for cooler weather. Right now I wear my long sleeve Polyester golf shirts - but the wool is so much nicer to wear.

    I might have to replace my S25 with an S19 if I keep going!
    Last edited by SKIMT; 01-12-2016, 07:45 PM.

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      #47
      Thanks! I love this list.

      Comment


        #48
        This is what I packed traveling to a country with no electricity/running water (using the river for wash/etc)/etc. for 2 weeks, +1 week of (engineering, no suit req.) work in the US (3 weeks total):

        Bags: Aeronaut 45 + cheapo day bag that folds into it's own pocket and goes in the aeronaut (amazon, there's plenty e.g. Amazon.com : Homdox® Ultra Lightweight Packable Backpack Hiking Daypack Travelling Backpack / Handy Foldable Camping Outdoor Travel Cycling School Air Travelling Carry on Backpacking/ Durable Light Backpack for Men and Women - Ultralight and Handy -)
        Packs: 1/4 ziplock bags, 1 medium tb pack, 1 small, 1 big eagle creek pack, 1 small , 1 8L drybag (for washing and other things)

        - 2x short sleeve merino tshirts (icebreaker) +1x long sleeves merino tshirts (minus33)
        - 1x slim dungarees outlier pants + belt (very good lightweight replacement for jeans + work clothing, also i like this belt in particular: Columbia Men's 38mm Cotton Washed Webbing, Black, 42 at Amazon Men’s Clothing store: Apparel Belts)
        - 1x columbia silver ridge convertible pants (awesome hot-weather pants, ultra light, ultra fast dry, looks good)
        - 3x merino socks from people socks (they're long and "heavy" but work well in both cold and hot weather if you dont mind the hotweather goofyness)
        - 3x ExOfficio briefs (sport)
        - 1x hoodie
        - 1x bike windproof + water-resistant micro jacket (these cost a good bit but are the smallest windproof jackets ever, any micro bike jacket will do)
        - 1x toothbrush, 1x travel sized toothpaste
        - 1x biodegradable liquid soap from campsud (for everything from clothe to body washing)
        - 1x microfiber towel (these are awesome, they dry very fast)
        - 1x hat
        - 1x sun cream
        - 1x electric razor (charged + antibacterial wipes (excellent alternative to soap or expensive creams - use as aftershave)
        - 1x 13" laptop + charger + usb cable (in the backpack-shoulder-strap panel of the aeronaut, using a laptop cache)
        - 1x waterproof hiking shoes that don't look too much like hiking shoes ;-) (some look like sport shoes, works in most environments where you don't need a suit)
        - 1x flip flaps
        - 1x UV + charcoal water filter (used various plastic bottles w/ it)
        - 1x buff or buff-like hat thing, useful for everything including cleanup of stuff ;-)

        that's it!

        I had plenty of room spare to put in gifts and other non-essential things (incl. my mirrorless camera). I never felt like I was missing anything. Washing things every 2nd day due to hot weather+exercise but if you don't sweat you could get away with +- once a week (max)

        Basically, this is a one-bag carryon travel solution, which i carry on my back using the backpack straps for long-ish distances, with room to spare for "things" whenever necessary.
        The things that I find most useful are...

        - merino clothing. always amazing. doesn't stink, easy to wash, light, works in a large range of weather, fast dry.
        - outlier pants: as good as everyone says. feels like the merino of the pants.
        - the columbia pants if you like hiking/etc.
        - the antibacterial wipes when there is no running water ;-)
        - the bike jacket

        hope this helps!
        Last edited by jimmy; 01-18-2016, 09:32 PM.

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          #49
          I keep starting replies to this:

          Originally posted by backpack View Post
          I considered minimalist shoes as main walking shoes but they are unsuitable for walking in cities with cobblestones or uneven pavement, especially if it is raining.

          Brands with structure, protective build and most importantly non-slip soles are more appropriate[....]
          It varies. Think of the season. Think of the types of activities you're honestly likely to do. Mostly, though, think about what you normally like to have on your feet when you're doing a lot of walking.

          I spend most of my time in flat, supple shoes. Yes, they're ouchy on cobblestones. For me, that kind of ouchiness is preferable to the foot cramps I got when trying to wear my padded, supportive, hard-shanked walking shoe "foot pillows". Others will assess that balance differently.

          When I spent a month in Denmark and Sweden last September--mild season, mostly urban--I took 2 pairs of shoes:
          1. flat, soft leather Mary-Jane-style shoes with an elastic strap (the discontinued Hush Puppies Sabella in black)
          2. minimalist running shoes (Merrell Pace Gloves in nearly-black)


          We walked roughly 20 km per day for most of the first week we were in Copenhagen. I was very aware of the cobblestones that run in two parallel lines along the direction of travel of the pedestrian paths. And that's the way I prefer it.

          So, don't assume you should or shouldn't travel with minimalist shoes. If you wear them regularly at home and like using your arches when you walk, take them travelling with you as well.

          Comment


            #50
            Originally posted by Hanaper View Post
            I keep starting replies to this:



            It varies. Think of the season. Think of the types of activities you're honestly likely to do. Mostly, though, think about what you normally like to have on your feet when you're doing a lot of walking.

            I spend most of my time in flat, supple shoes. Yes, they're ouchy on cobblestones. For me, that kind of ouchiness is preferable to the foot cramps I got when trying to wear my padded, supportive, hard-shanked walking shoe "foot pillows". Others will assess that balance differently.

            When I spent a month in Denmark and Sweden last September--mild season, mostly urban--I took 2 pairs of shoes:
            1. flat, soft leather Mary-Jane-style shoes with an elastic strap (the discontinued Hush Puppies Sabella in black)
            2. minimalist running shoes (Merrell Pace Gloves in nearly-black)


            We walked roughly 20 km per day for most of the first week we were in Copenhagen. I was very aware of the cobblestones that run in two parallel lines along the direction of travel of the pedestrian paths. And that's the way I prefer it.

            So, don't assume you should or shouldn't travel with minimalist shoes. If you wear them regularly at home and like using your arches when you walk, take them travelling with you as well.
            I completely agree. I love walking everywhere in my vibram five finger alitzas.

            But I wouldn't recommend trying minimalist shoes on a trip for the first time just because they are so small and lightweight for packing. Try them at home first to check they are comfortable, and if you like them, they'll be fine for travelling.

            Comment


              #51
              I recommend the scrubba bag for laundry collection and washing if doing more than a single pair of undies or socks. The hotel sink is fine for occasional use but for daily washing particularly of shirts and trousers too (or washing for more than one person) or camping washing, I found it is worth slight extra weight.
              Last edited by Kirri; 01-19-2016, 01:56 PM. Reason: Added link

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                #52
                In reply to SKIMT's original post someone wonderful (thank you!) mentioned in another thread that you can order empty refillable tapered, not tube 8ml 'lipgloss' containers. I use these to carry small amounts of cream/lotions (pawpaw for grazes/sores, body shop hemp hand cream, natural anti-itch cream for mozzie, ant or leech bites) in my EDC. This means I already have them when travelling.

                Comment


                  #53
                  Originally posted by SKIMT View Post
                  4. Shoes and/or flip flops stored in blue hospital shoe covers
                  Just wanted to mention here that there's something even smaller and lighter than blue hospital shoe covers: disposable shower caps. I always take them whenever they supply them in the hotel room. You need two, of course (for the pair), and unless you need to pack ski boots, they fit any size/type shoe. They don't last forever, but they are fantastic. Plus, they are transparent.

                  Originally posted by JLE View Post
                  3. Travel sized hair straightening irons - weigh very little, take up far less packing space than a travel hair dryer and can rectify styling deficiencies produced by using sub-standard hotel hair dryers.
                  One way around carrying extra hair products and gadgets is to get a haircut/hair style that doesn't require this stuff. I've gone to a really really short pixie cut, and I don't need straighteners, curlers, or dryers anymore.

                  Comment


                    #54
                    @ Jimmy - How do you like the Minus33 brand? Is it as good as Icebreaker? I'd like to find a light colored or even white 100% wool T-shirt.

                    @ Kirri - That scrubba bag is on my list to buy. I had tried an REI dry bag but the Scruba might be more effective with the ribbed interior.

                    @ Lani - Nice tip on the shower caps! I like the idea of clear for TSA.
                    Last edited by SKIMT; 01-20-2016, 09:31 PM.

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                      #55
                      Great renewal of this thread. Thanks to all of you I've come up with a few more minimalist ideas.

                      @Jimmy My understanding, after looking for white/light colored merino myself for a while is that you can't get pure white. I am assuming that it is because the bleach would alter the great inherent properties of the fibers and that sheep are not pure white on their own. I was able to get an ivory merino shirt from Duckworth and Outlier has a cotton on the outside, merino on the inside pure white shirt. I've been tempted to get one of those for my husband but I have difficulty fitting into men's smaller sizes. Don't have any direct experience with it though--I'd be curious to hear from those who do.

                      I recently got a couple of merino synthetic blends in bright colors from super.natural and I've been really pleased with those--not quite as nice as pure merino, but was able to get a couple of colors not available from the standard merino companies like royal blue and bright orange. It wasn't clear that the company still distributes in the North America, but there were still some available from Sierra Trading post when I bought mine.
                      A30 Black Dyneema/Wasabi, PCSB Iberian, S19 Black Dyneema/Wasabi, SE Forest/UV, SCB Orange 152/Navy , A30 End Pocket PC Steel Dyneema, TSS in various sizes: Solar, Iberian, Wasabi, Steel, and Zest. 3D COC Orange 152, COP Cayenne, Small OP Solar, COW Wasabi, LSB Wasabi, SSB Zest, PCBP Steel, TT Zest,

                      Comment


                        #56
                        @TrailRunner -- Do you have any opinions or reviews of Duckworth and Outlier shirts? I have some Icebreaker but have looked at both of those other brands.


                        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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                          #57
                          The entire merino wool discovery has literally lightened my load beyond belief and laundry is so much easier. The white / bleach idea makes sense. Patagonia makes some light colored wool / capilene shirts but I'd love recommendations if anyone knows of lighter color 100% wool. I'm thinking the black and darker gray smart wool ones I have will be too hot in the summer?

                          Comment


                            #58
                            Originally posted by SKIMT View Post
                            I'd love recommendations if anyone knows of lighter color 100% wool. I'm thinking the black and darker gray smart wool ones I have will be too hot in the summer?
                            I have a light blue buttondown shirt from Ibex, they do have the occasional lighter color in their lineup. I also have a bright pink Ibex tee which while definitely not neutral is at least lighter on a hot day than all-black. From Icebreaker the lightest color I've found is gray - a sort of heathered gray. Lately I've seen some of their woven buttondowns in a small plaid, with white (or off-white) as one of the colors (so, purple/white or green/white). I don't own one of those (yet ;P) so can't speak to their comfort level in the heat.

                            Mainly I find for me the weight of the fabric matters more than the color. 150 gsm works for me as an all-weather base layer. I have taken a turquoise Icebreaker tee with me for hot-weather trips, but actually I found it easier for mix-match purposes to stick to an all-neutral palette (i.e. a black tee), and so when it's really scorching out I just throw a long-sleeved white shirt on top for extra coverage and sunlight deflection. Marmot, Columbia, and a few other brands make high-UPF shirts which are nice and light for packing, and also look a little dressier than a tee.

                            Comment


                              #59
                              SKIMT - check out Woolly Clothing Co. They have a couple of t-shirts in ivory and light blue http://www.woollyclothing.co

                              Comment


                                #60
                                Originally posted by haraya View Post
                                I found it easier for mix-match purposes to stick to an all-neutral palette (i.e. a black tee), and so when it's really scorching out I just throw a long-sleeved white shirt on top for extra coverage and sunlight deflection. Marmot, Columbia, and a few other brands make high-UPF shirts which are nice and light for packing, and also look a little dressier than a tee.
                                Good point! Thanks for the idea.

                                Comment

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