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Chicagoan Takes a Hike [with the Addax 31]

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    Chicagoan Takes a Hike [with the Addax 31]

    Chicagoan Takes a Hike [with the Addax 31]

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    I had three thousand words already written on this bag and I trashed all of them.

    Most folks reviewing this bag are going to talk about using it for everyday carry or travel.

    That's not what I used it for.

    And it isn't what excites me most about a roll-top backpack with an exterior water bottle pocket.

    The first second I saw the bag (it was sent as a surprise) I saw both those features and thought "Holy ****, they finally made a hiking backpack."

    So I'm going to skip straight past all the EDC and travel talk, and tell you how well this works as a hiking daypack, because that's how I use it.

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    Size

    It's a big bag! Why? It's tall, and wide. But it's shallow.

    Normally I can't stand big backpacks. I won't buy much less wear a S25 or SN30.

    But this bag reminds me most of the Luminary - it uses height for storage more than depth.

    This means the load stays close to your back, making it a more stable and comfortable carry.

    It also means it's easier to pack the bag more evenly, because the items stack atop each other within a narrow circumference - you don't feel like a turtle carrying his shell wearing this bag, even when it's packed full.

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    Weight

    Like a few others have said, it's heavy right out of the box.

    How heavy? The ballistic version I got is 3 pounds, empty.

    For perspective: when I go backpacking, my tent, sleeping bag, and backpack COMBINED weigh a little over 3 pounds, and those are the three biggest, heaviest items I carry.

    A lot of that weight comes from incorporating a suspended, padded, laptop compartment with both interior and exterior access.

    If it doesn't go without saying, when I go hiking, I don't exactly carry the tablet along with me on the trail, and it left me wanting a version of this bag that could remove that feature and reduce the weight.

    I did not get an internal frame or hip belt (only the stock 1.5" unpadded webbing waist strap) so I can't speak to any difference made to carrying comfort by the accessories.

    Choosing Xpac instead of Ballistic will save you 4 ounces, and, had I the choice, I'd probably have swung for that as an easy way to cut weight without removing any functionality from the bag.

    Price

    I don't mind the price, and as someone who buys ultralight hiking gear, I've accepted that certain materials just cost more money, and beyond that, you pay for the quality you get.

    Tom Bihn just uses quality materials (their zippers especially are top-notch!) and at this point in my life, I don't think I could buy a bag from any less a brand, even if it means paying more (or a lot more) than an average cost, and I'm completely OK with that.

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    First Impressions

    This bag was a gift. Literal gift. I wrote a blog post, and Maia thanked me by putting a free bag in the mail.

    Closer to shipment, I learned it was going to be a new product, and there would be a few accessories, too.

    But that's it. A "bag." So I had no idea what I was going to get.

    The box that came in the mail was the biggest branded one they use, and when it arrived, I cracked it right open, took one look, shouted "YES!" as I noticed the roll top and external water bottle pocket, and thought, "Holy s***, Jose finally designed a hiking backpack."

    I'm a methodical person, almost to a fault, and there's little I do (or eat) that isn't premeditated.

    So I didn't know what bag I was getting until I actually saw it for the first time. I mean, hell, we can go on Yelp and look at pictures of the menu items we order for dinner months before we sit down for our reservations, so to be completely surprised was a total freakin' delight, and probably the most fun I've ever had opening a Tom Bihn box.

    Jose made some smart design moves with his debut bag design - the Addax is filled with homage to traditional, familiar Tom Bihn design features, and he incorporates these without losing any of his own originality.

    It reminds me a lot of how Hans Zimmer wrote the musical score for the most recent James Bond movie - instead of relying solely on an original theme, he borrowed melodies from previous films, and wasn't subtle about it. Loud, brassy horns, blaring out "Gold-fing-er!" Yep. They're in there unabashedly. It wasn't lazy. It was clever, and most importantly, nostalgic. It ties the new together with the old in a meaningful way, and in the end, makes you love the whole more than the sum of its parts.

    The overall design is familiar: it's a riff on a style popular with ultralight hikers, which essentially takes a roll-top dry bag, and adds shoulder straps and a few outside pockets.

    But what I appreciate most is that Jose improved upon the design, making it all at once recognizable, original, and timeless.

    It's not fad-driven or trend-setting, and that's great, because steering around those things is how you get from today to staying power.

    Field Testing

    For me, the best way to test how comfortable a bag is to wear for long periods of time is to take it hiking.

    So far, I've carried the Addax around for 10 miles of hiking across 2 different weekend day hikes at Volo Bog State Natural Area and the Paul Douglas Forest Preserve here in Illinois.

    For me, two things matter: how easily it packs/unpacks, and how comfortably it carries.

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    Packing

    The Addax, like the Luminary and Cambiata, is self-supporting and stands on its own. The main compartment tends to keep the heaviest items at the bottom, and beyond the weight, the structure built into the bag keeps the sides rigid enough that once you set the bag down and unroll the top, it stays upright, and it stays open.

    A lot of folks will b**** about a roll-top consolidating everything toward the bottom because, well, gravity. If you throw everything into the one same main compartment, sure, it's going to become a clusterf***, and the same would happen in a Synapse. Or Shadow Guide. Or Paragon.

    But guess what? Jose is a smart dude and thought about that.

    So he gave you five pockets on the outside, five(?) pockets on the inside, and 9 O-Rings for you to keep your stuff straight.

    Roll-tops without organization, do, in fact, suck. Most ultralight hiking backpacks are nothing more than dry bags with shoulder straps and three outside pockets, meaning whatever you want to keep dry gets all mixed together in the one and only main compartment.

    The outside pockets keep your small stuff within quick and easy reach, and if the weather turns, you can unfurl the top and stash the small stuff in a couple small mesh pockets near the top. If you've got bigger stuff to keep separate, there's a stretch mesh pocket at the bottom of the bag, in front of the laptop compartment.

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    (FYI, I only count 4 interior pockets, but the website listing mentions 5 - am I missing one?)

    So what all fits inside an Addax 31?

    A hell of a lot, turns out. Most, if not all, your EDC and 10 Essentials items will fit inside the smaller compartments, and spill a little into the bottom of the main compartment. Which is great. You can toss all the big, bulky stuff on top, like a packed lunch, extra or unneeded layers, etc.

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    ---

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    The Exterior Upper Compartment is shallow and more organized, with 2 O-Rings and 2 mesh pockets.

    What fits: pocket comb, lip balm, Nik's Minimalist No. 3 Wallet, headlamp.

    ---

    The Exterior Lower Compartment is deep and less organized, with 2 o-rings. It is an open compartment without dividers or pockets.

    What fits: camera w/ spare battery, spare memory card, and case, 2 breakfast bars, Mini GWOP with First Aid items (wet wipes, moleskin, finger bandages, blister bandages, leukotape, roll gauze, hand sanitizer, non-aspirin, antacid, antibiotic ointment, hydrocortisone cream, loperamide, diphenhydramine, medi-lyte, tick removal key, safety pins, dropper bottle of soap, dropped bottle of contact lens solution).

    ---

    The Exterior Side Compartment is tall (almost the full height of the bag) AND deep, and easily will fit a second bottle of water (hikers drink in twos) but also has 1 O-Ring that's great for stashing your keys, because no one wants to hear you jangle like a school janitor down the trail.

    What fits: key strap, house, office and car keys, 2nd bottle of water, rehydration tablets.

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    ---

    The Exterior Water Bottle Pocket is made from stretch mesh, which can snugly hold a variety of water bottle sizes and will drain any condensation coming off the bottle.

    What fits: x1 16.9-ounce recyclable bottle of drinking water, but it also fits the super-obligatory, one-liter-size bottle of Smart Water hikers love to lug around with them.

    ---

    The Main Interior Compartment has 4 o-rings, the built-in suspended and padded laptop compartment, two small mesh pockets toward the front of the top, and one large mesh pocket at the back of the bottom.

    What fits: pocketknife, lighter, matchbook, compass, medium power bank, cord, vertical packing organizer cube (with small and large backup power banks, charging cord, and wall plug charger), cookset (pot, lid, stove, fuel), small grab bag (spoon, collapsible cup, microfiber towel, instant coffee, pour over coffee), Aeronaut 30 Mesh Laundry Stuff Sack (spare tee, spare underwear, spare socks, rain jacket, rain pants, rain mitts, ankle gaiters, sun hat, bug head net, warm hat, warm gloves).

    Carrying

    This is where this bag excels.

    The exterior features are pretty much the same as my "Why doesn't Tom Bihn making a damn hiking backpack?" wishlist.

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    What makes the bag so comfortable to carry?

    The profile is tall, wide, and shallow, so it keeps all your gear close to your back and doesn't hang off you or pull you backwards.

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    Shoulder straps are thick, have smooth edges (great for tank top weather when this thing might go next-to-skin), and have a sternum strap (which can be outfitted with a whistle sternum strap if you really want to take this out hiking!). There's also a set of sewn-in strap keepers, which I appreciate, because if you're going to use this bag for an active hobby, there's a good chance the regular strap keepers might pop off.

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    The stock waist strap is 1.5" and wider than the typical Gatekeeper Waist Strap. Now, if your torso length is about the same as the height of this bag, and that belt can wrap around the tops of your hips, you *might* be able to redistribute some of the pack weight from your shoulders to your hips. If those two measurements don't line up, all this thing does is keep the pack stable and close (probably most appreciated by bike commuters more than hikers). Like the sternum strap, it's totally removable if you don't want to use it.

    I'm six feet tall with an 18.5 inch torso, and when I tighten the shoulder straps enough to make the pack sit correctly flush with the tops of my shoulders, the waist belt cuts across my literal waist, and I can't use the belt for weight redistribution. This also means that the a la carte frame sheet wouldn't help with weight, and would only serve to make the back panel smoother and flatter than it would be stock.

    What I appreciate MOST about the design of the outside of the bag is the fact Jose gave this thing the same skeleton-style, molded foam and mesh back panel that's on the Shadow Guide packs. Why? It actually creates gaps between your back and the bag, so air can pass through, keeping you cooler and preventing heat rash (which will happen if you wear a solid fabric pack like the DLBP on a hot day!).

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    The single biggest hiker-friendly design feature?

    AN EXTERNAL. WATER. BOTTLE. POCKET. Read that one more time.

    The centered internal water bottle pocket was a great way to keep the bag balanced, but it wasn't great at keeping the wearer hydrated.

    Jose's side water bottle pocket can be reached by removing a shoulder strap, swinging the bag in front of your body, and grabbing it that way. It also keeps the condensation outside of the pack, where it's better able to ventilate and keep dry.

    I've found the external side pocket is awesome for storing keys on a long key strap, with more than enough room left over for a second bottle of water, snacks, and some rehydration tablets. That pocket doesn't nearly get enough credit, because it's one of the easiest to reach while you're still wearing the bag.

    The external front side pockets are great for the small stuff, like a wallet, lip balm, camera, etc., and they're very easy to access when the bag keeps itself upright and the compartments all open with curved zippers.

    Loose Ends

    But what about the laptop compartment? Luggage pass-through? Internal frame? Front attachment point? O-Rings?

    Didn't use 'em. O-Rings to me feel like trying to walk around the house with a corded telephone (showing my age, here) and I prefer to just find accessories (like the Vertical Packing Cubelet) that slide into the built-in pockets like a cordless phone into its dock.

    I'd like to try the internal frame out when it becomes available - my only hesitancy in overpacking the bag, or packing it more closely to its maximum capacity, is that the body tends to take on a bowed, barrel shape the more you fill it.

    If I could, I'd trade the pack in for a 26L - I don't at all find it awkward when packs don't cover the full length of my back and honestly prefer smaller packs when I go hiking (my "sweet spot" is typically between 15 and 25 liters of capacity). This is entirely personal preference, and some folks - especially the taller kings and queens amongst us - will probably prefer the larger size.

    (Side note - any tall folks test out the Addax 26 and can speak for how it might fit on a 6' tall frame?)

    My biggest wish list item has always been a hiking backpack - the only bags I own that aren't made by Tom Bihn are the ones I use for backpacking.

    And, while they might not make one right now, or ever, maybe, they have made a backpack I would feel comfortable using on day hikes.

    Jose, like Tom himself said - this is a Tom Bihn bag, and congratulations. It's a hell of a debut. If ever I make it out to company headquarters one day, I'm giving you a high-five in person.​

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    Last edited by Chicagoan; 11-15-2022, 09:10 PM.
    I own a LOT of Tom Bihn bags, but here are the ones I'm using right now:
    Everyday Carry: SK
    Hiking Daypack: Cambiata

    Car Travel: SK, T45, MT
    Plane
    ​Travel: CP, TS, SZTSB

    #2
    Nice Chicagoan !

    Above and beyond the great review;(with Bond references no less), those are awesome photos of what Ursa really looks like!
    “Commander, I always used to consider that you had a definite anti-authoritarian streak in you.”
    “Sir?”
    “It seems that you have managed to retain this even though you are authority.”
    “Sir?”
    “That’s practically zen.”
    -Terry Pratchett, Feet of Clay

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by G42 View Post
      Nice Chicagoan !

      Above and beyond the great review;(with Bond references no less), those are awesome photos of what Ursa really looks like!
      Thank you much, G42.

      I was very fortunate to have a couple of much-nicer-than-usual fall days to test and photograph the bag - normally Ursa isn't as photographically compliant!
      I own a LOT of Tom Bihn bags, but here are the ones I'm using right now:
      Everyday Carry: SK
      Hiking Daypack: Cambiata

      Car Travel: SK, T45, MT
      Plane
      ​Travel: CP, TS, SZTSB

      Comment


        #4
        Great review. The only concern I would have using it as a hiking backpack is that while the back panel is mesh it isn't a true ventilated back panel. I hike in the hot and steamy South and ventilation is necessary.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Shortie View Post
          Great review. The only concern I would have using it as a hiking backpack is that while the back panel is mesh it isn't a true ventilated back panel. I hike in the hot and steamy South and ventilation is necessary.
          I should add - my "sweet spot" for day hiking is between 15 and 25 liters, but for overnight or multi-day backpacking, I really need at least 45 liters, so while this is a bigger bag, I don't think it's quite big enough to fit items as big as a tent and sleeping bag, along with the other items required for temporarily living outside.

          Did Jose design the Addax for hikers?

          No, but if I had to take one bag from the product line out hiking with me, the ADX (can we just roll with this abbreviation, MikeV ?) is the one that checks the most boxes. It's most like the backpacks I'm used to using for hiking while making some improvements upon that style, too.

          Many ultralight backpacking packs (and almost all of the frameless ones) typically have a solid fabric back panel. Some are kind enough to provide shock cord or a sleeve where you can hold a closed-cell foam sit pad in place, and while it creates a makeshift back panel, it's always a little clunky at best.

          So I'm used to NOT having ventilation, and when a bag offers some, it's a win, if even a small one.

          I did sweat while wearing this bag but not nearly as much as I would have had the back panel been solid fabric.
          Last edited by Chicagoan; 11-16-2022, 06:26 AM.
          I own a LOT of Tom Bihn bags, but here are the ones I'm using right now:
          Everyday Carry: SK
          Hiking Daypack: Cambiata

          Car Travel: SK, T45, MT
          Plane
          ​Travel: CP, TS, SZTSB

          Comment


            #6
            Fantastic review! Thanks! You bring up a lot of good points, including the weight. As I don’t need to go larger than 20 liters, I’ll stick with my tried and true Paragons. I would appreciate more pockets though, so if eventually the Addax or something like it comes out in a smaller size (in XPac), I’d consider it. The roll top doesn’t immediately appeal to me but perhaps it would be ok if there were sufficient pockets to prevent needing to open the main compartment all the time, which might be the case. But I appreciate the time you took to write this review and get the photos.

            I do like the trend towards “flat” packs. They seem to be more comfortable due to the weight distribution. I notice more people on my commuter train going in that direction too.
            ----
            All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.
            Edmund Burke

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by bchaplin View Post
              Fantastic review! Thanks! You bring up a lot of good points, including the weight. As I don’t need to go larger than 20 liters, I’ll stick with my tried and true Paragons. I would appreciate more pockets though, so if eventually the Addax or something like it comes out in a smaller size (in XPac), I’d consider it. The roll top doesn’t immediately appeal to me but perhaps it would be ok if there were sufficient pockets to prevent needing to open the main compartment all the time, which might be the case. But I appreciate the time you took to write this review and get the photos.

              I do like the trend towards “flat” packs. They seem to be more comfortable due to the weight distribution. I notice more people on my commuter train going in that direction too.
              Thanks, bchaplin! Appreciate you reading all the way through and saying some nice things.

              It might be a hard gear shift for folks who only know (or are just used to) zipper and flat closure styles, but the roll-top is super easy to use, and has become so popular with the outdoor community simply because of how weather resistant it is by design.

              Since the backpack is fully lined, the top "collar" has enough weight on its own you could just let it fall down flat on the bag without clipping it. If I carried it around every day, I'd probably just do that and not bother rolling or clipping unless it was going to be a wet commute.

              I'm a little lazy and love open-top bags I can carry around without having to zip shut: the Addax, Cambiata, Luminary, and all my favorite crossbody bags (Co-Pilot, Side Kick, Everyday Cubelet) so the smaller, 26L size is definitely appealing and might be the difference between carrying this bag just on day hikes, and carrying it around with me every day.

              Agreed! "Flat" packs just carry a lot more comfortably, and while I normally wouldn't buy or wear a bag that's as tall or wide as this one, the slim profile is a complete game changer, and I didn't mind wearing it at all. I don't think I ever thought once about the bag being too big while using it.

              And I will add this about the weight of the bag: my hiking backpacks are all very light, and usually, weigh a pound (or less!). Did this ever feel like three times the weight? Not while it was on my back, and it's a surprisingly comfy carry.
              Last edited by Chicagoan; 11-16-2022, 07:32 PM.
              I own a LOT of Tom Bihn bags, but here are the ones I'm using right now:
              Everyday Carry: SK
              Hiking Daypack: Cambiata

              Car Travel: SK, T45, MT
              Plane
              ​Travel: CP, TS, SZTSB

              Comment


                #8
                Great review! Very thorough and I appreciate the perspective of hiking rather than travel or commuting. I hadn’t really thought about how the flatness affects weight distribution. My current favorite big bag is a Brain Bag and that’s definitely the opposite of flat, so I will keep that in mind.

                I too am old enough to remember walking around the house with a corded phone, and my mother bought an extra long cord for it so it could go around the whole downstairs 🤣

                Comment


                  #9
                  Thank you kindly, Cristina!

                  The whole weight distribution thing was something I figured out trying to find a common denominator between the backpacks I like most - there's definitely a shared set of features, and it helped me recognize similarities between the crossbody bags I like most, too. It makes it easy trying to decide if a new bag will be a good fit or not.

                  My grandmother kept a corded phone in her kitchen and would always replace it with a corded phone until stores literally stopped selling them - she, too, had a cord that could span rooms! :-)

                  I only use O-Rings for two things:

                  1.) my house, office and car keys, and

                  2.) a Mini Halcyon Organizer Pouch that I use as my wallet.

                  Any more key straps than that, I feel like I'm trying to untangle holiday lights.
                  Last edited by Chicagoan; 11-17-2022, 06:40 AM.
                  I own a LOT of Tom Bihn bags, but here are the ones I'm using right now:
                  Everyday Carry: SK
                  Hiking Daypack: Cambiata

                  Car Travel: SK, T45, MT
                  Plane
                  ​Travel: CP, TS, SZTSB

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Cristina View Post
                    I too am old enough to remember walking around the house with a corded phone, and my mother bought an extra long cord for it so it could go around the whole downstairs 🤣
                    I was under the impression the long cords were nice to talk anywhere in the house, but moreso to have a reason so the kids would not run around in fear of that cord being an obstacle. In my older years now, I realize the peace gained by the lower pace of the children. It's not control, its management.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Trying to take pictures in natural light really doesn't happen when it's both after the workday AND after turning the clocks back, so I had to get creative, and use my camping lantern as a makeshift sun. Same diff, right? :-/

                      I'm glad I got as many shots outside as I did - Ursa is a notoriously difficult fabric color to capture accurately, and I think my pictures are pretty close.

                      And while I have a lot of pictures using the bag outside, I just didn't have a lot of the inside of the bag.

                      So that's what I'm adding to my review tonight.

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                      The top exterior pocket is nice for the small stuff I want right away, like a pocket comb, lip balm, sunglasses, and my headlamp.

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                      The bottom exterior pocket is nice for stuff I want to grab on a quick break, like the spare battery or memory card in my camera case, snacks, or any of my first aid items.

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                      The exterior side pocket is my favorite place to clip my keys, and stash a spare bottle of water and rehydration tablets. You can EASILY stash a second full liter of water in here. Other suggested it's a good place for an umbrella, if you carry one, and I'd wholeheartedly agree.

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                      The exterior water bottle pocket comfortably fits the oh-so-obligatory one-liter-size bottle of Smart Water. Seeing one of these on a hiker is about as surprising as spotting a Subaru with a National Park sticker.

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                      Yes, you can clip the roll top's buckles together in the middle. While it functions the same, closing the bag off from the elements, it's not as clean a look. If you're in a hurry to get into and out of the bag, though, it's a helpful way to do it. It does take a little more time to independently buckle each side.

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                      I didn't even think to roll the collar back down over the bag until I saw Tom Bihn's own product pages, but it does help make packing the bag a lot easier because you don't have to reach down so far to touch bottom. Since the collar is the part of the bag that is going to be rolled down shut, you're still able to cram gear right up to the start of the collar - which is also the technical "top" of the bag as they measured it to hold 31 liters, and packing up to that point will still allow you to roll the top down three times, closing it fully.

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                      The main compartment fits everything else, and usually, it's either the stuff too bulky for the small pockets (like a puffy vest) or something I won't need until I stop and take a longer break, like my coffee making equipment.

                      FYI, the laundry sack is where I keep all my spare hiking clothes for sun, bugs, wet and cold weather.

                      The VPC holds power banks, as well as the cords to use and charge them, and a wall plug to recharge the banks.

                      My cookset has its own stuff sack, and that's everything I need to boil water for coffee and meals.

                      And the Small Grab Bag contains my coffee making items, like a collapsible cup, spoon, instant and pour over coffees, as well as a towel to help with basic dish washing.

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                      The thing fits a hell of a lot of gear - everything you see pictures is exactly what I was carrying on my back in all those hiking pictures, and even packed full of all this stuff, it doesn't get lumpy and maintains a pretty flat, sleek profile. Like moriond mentioned, the bottom profile is rectangular (opposed to the oval bottoms on the SG23 and SG33) and it allows laptops and tablets to sit flat against the back of the pack, which also adds rigidity and keeps the back of the pack flat against your own back.

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                      There's snow on the ground outside, and too much stuff inside my apartment, so I don't have room for a proper "flat lay" picture, but I did break down the contents as far as I could and spread them out on the floor just so you can get a true idea of how much stuff fits in this bag WITH ROOM TO SPARE. There was still plenty of room left inside all the compartments after repacking the contents back into the bag.

                      Would I want to pack more? Probably not. All my stuff and the pack weighs about 12 pounds, total, and 3 of those pounds come from the empty backpack. But you could easily stuff some extra layers in there, like a puffy coat, or blanket, or even a little more food if you wanted to carry a picnic lunch out with you.

                      Click image for larger version  Name:	20221117_185520.jpg Views:	1 Size:	3.21 MB ID:	344159

                      Click image for larger version  Name:	20221117_190122.jpg Views:	1 Size:	2.83 MB ID:	344158

                      For those of you reading all the way through, thank you, and I hope this all makes you feel one way or another about the bag - either encouraging the purchase, or leading you toward another Tom Bihn bag you might like a little more.
                      Last edited by Chicagoan; 11-17-2022, 06:26 PM.
                      I own a LOT of Tom Bihn bags, but here are the ones I'm using right now:
                      Everyday Carry: SK
                      Hiking Daypack: Cambiata

                      Car Travel: SK, T45, MT
                      Plane
                      ​Travel: CP, TS, SZTSB

                      Comment


                        #12
                        It's always good to see pictures, but thanks in particular for posting the pics of the top section turned inside out to the collar. Is not terribly hard to do and offers a way to access the bag, when hanging out, that's super useful.
                        “Commander, I always used to consider that you had a definite anti-authoritarian streak in you.”
                        “Sir?”
                        “It seems that you have managed to retain this even though you are authority.”
                        “Sir?”
                        “That’s practically zen.”
                        -Terry Pratchett, Feet of Clay

                        Comment


                          #13
                          How easy is it to invert the roll part? Does it quickly slide right down or do you have to sort of jimmy it? Maybe on a future iteration they could include a grab handle on the inside, to help with moving the bag around while the roll part is inverted.
                          Currently trying out a secondhand Red Blend S19 for EDC!

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by epeterson View Post
                            How easy is it to invert the roll part? Does it quickly slide right down or do you have to sort of jimmy it? Maybe on a future iteration they could include a grab handle on the inside, to help with moving the bag around while the roll part is inverted.
                            I hope a reviewer can post a video to demonstrate how to roll the collar down - it's not hard, but a written explanation would probably make it sound more complicated than it actually is, and once you understand the concept and have practiced a couple times, it's not hard at all. It's a new feature most folks just aren't aware of, or used to having.

                            Best advice?

                            Reach inside the bag and grab onto the black grosgrain seam where the top of the compartment meets the start of the collar, and hold that firmly while using your other hand to grab the rim of the opening, pulling it down and behind the hand you have holding the inside seam.

                            It's honestly a great hack that makes the bag a million times easier to pack.

                            And epeterson, I agree - if they can add those handles inside the opening of the Aeronauts, they could add a grab loop to help with rolling the collar down down on the Addax(es?).
                            Last edited by Chicagoan; 11-17-2022, 06:37 PM.
                            I own a LOT of Tom Bihn bags, but here are the ones I'm using right now:
                            Everyday Carry: SK
                            Hiking Daypack: Cambiata

                            Car Travel: SK, T45, MT
                            Plane
                            ​Travel: CP, TS, SZTSB

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Chicagoan View Post
                              if they can add those handles inside the opening of the Aeronauts, they could add a grab loop to help with rolling the collar down down on the Addax(es?).
                              Yup, there's a grab handle under the "brain" in the Shadow Guide which is ideal for moving the bag around while the main compartment is open. This would serve the same purpose with the Addax in "inverted" mode, and as you pointed out, probably make it easier to invert as well.
                              Currently trying out a secondhand Red Blend S19 for EDC!

                              Comment

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