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Terrible discoloration on Founder's Briefcase

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    Terrible discoloration on Founder's Briefcase

    Only carried my new Founder's Briefcase 7-8 times and the felt patches on the sides have turned blue from rubbing against my jeans! Has this happened to anyone before with the FB or another bag? Any idea on the best way to clean these patches? Sad to see my nice new (and expensive) briefcase stained so soon from normal use.

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    #2
    Originally posted by JumpJ37 View Post
    Only carried my new Founder's Briefcase 7-8 times and the felt patches on the sides have turned blue from rubbing against my jeans! Has this happened to anyone before with the FB or another bag? Any idea on the best way to clean these patches? Sad to see my nice new (and expensive) briefcase stained so soon from normal use.

    [ATTACH=CONFIG]17454[/ATTACH]
    What a bummer! I don't have advice on cleaning the fabric, but that happens to my sisters' leather seats in their cars all the time when they wear dark wash jeans.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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      #3
      Blame your jeans, not the bag.

      Comment


        #4
        Blame the jeans, not the bag, is right.

        Indigo is a vat dye. It is very different from other dyes.

        Most dyes, you put the dye in water with other chemicals to make the dyes bond to the fiber, and then you put the fabric in the water and the fabric turns the color of the dye bath.

        With Indigo, when you put the fabric in the dye bath, the cloth does NOT turn blue. When you lift the fabric out of the water, it is yellowish green, and only turns blue when the wet fabric comes in contact with oxygen in the air. To get a good dark blue, the fabric is dipped into the indigo vat multiple times and lifted out to oxidize blue over and over. However, there will be excess indigo that will "crock" off (i.e. rub off) on light colored fabrics. This will happen until the indigo fabric has been washed enough times for the excess indigo to all be gone. That's why most people love faded blue jeans. The excess indigo has already been removed.

        There are a couple of different solutions to your problem.

        1. Paint your new jeans with soymilk all over, and let them dry. Hang them up somewhere dry for 3 months. No, they will NOT smell and will not attract insects. Then wash them after 3 months. The soy protein will lock in the indigo and prevent it from crocking off on your clothing and briefcase. I got this method from a well known dye artist and I've tried it, and it really works. You just have to be willing to let your board hard, soy milk encrusted jeans hang around for 3 months, unworn.

        OR

        2. Wash your new jeans with some bleach. Wash them several times until the indigo quits crocking off on your other fabrics. If you didn't want faded jeans, you're out of luck.

        OR

        3. Don't wear jeans when you carry your briefcase. Khakis were invented for a reason.

        OR

        4. Wear a long jacket or rain coat when carrying your briefcase.

        There is no easy way to remove the blue that has rubbed into your briefcase. Just enjoy the weathered look and pretend you wanted it to happen.

        There's a reason old flags were some combination of red, white or blue. Those were the only colors that were both lightfast and washfast. In other words, they would not fade in sunlight or water. The last thing you wanted in the middle of a battle was to have your flag fade to white when you didn't want to surrender.
        Last edited by BWeaves; 02-07-2017, 08:17 AM.

        Comment


          #5
          I agree that this is a product of the type/color jeans you are wearing. I would drop customer service an email for info on spot cleaning and perhaps prevention moving forward.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by stevenkelby View Post
            Blame your jeans, not the bag.
            I don't blame the bag, I was just hoping for some helpful feedback from others who may have experienced a similar problem. Thanks for your helpful response.

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              #7
              Thanks for the useful advice! I emailed customer service and they sent me some information. I was hoping someone in the forums may have experience with this material before I try washing it.

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                #8
                UPDATE: For anyone who may have this problem in the future, I was able to clean the felt squares using only water and an absorbent towel. I used hot water and lightly scrubbed it, dried it, and repeat. They look very close to new and now I'll be very careful not to use the bag when wearing dark-colored jeans!

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                  #9
                  I've had that issue on my white cotton slipcovers on my sofa. I found that shout wipes can remove the discoloration if it isn't too bad, and if it is, using Bissel Pet-Formulated carpet cleaner with Scotchguard in my steam cleaner or adding a bit to the washing machine removes it. You could probably soak a sponge and use it to remove the discoloration as well (maybe do a test patch first). I hate how most dark wash jeans seem to have this issue nowadays. It feel like manufactures are taking shortcuts in getting the dye to set properly.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by flaneuse View Post
                    I've had that issue on my white cotton slipcovers on my sofa. I found that shout wipes can remove the discoloration if it isn't too bad, and if it is, using Bissel Pet-Formulated carpet cleaner with Scotchguard in my steam cleaner or adding a bit to the washing machine removes it. You could probably soak a sponge and use it to remove the discoloration as well (maybe do a test patch first). I hate how most dark wash jeans seem to have this issue nowadays. It feel like manufactures are taking shortcuts in getting the dye to set properly.
                    +1

                    my uncle have Bissell carpet cleaner and don't recommend it. It operates on suction power and even with a little pressure on the carpet it will slow down and stop. It just as easy to manually move the included brush back and forth to clean the carpet.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Whenever I have new, dark colored clothing, I add a quarter cup of white vinegar to the wash cycle to help set the color (won't hurt most other clothes along for the ride). Has always worked great and I never smell like a pickle! I would imagine you could do that for the first few washes to really set the color. Maybe research Scotchguard to protect the bag from inevitable color transfer until the clothing item color is set?

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                        #12
                        The white vinegar thing actually only works while you are dyeing the fabric, and only if it is an acid dye (vinegar is an acid). Acid dyes (along with salt) are used on protein fibers like wool and silk. Cellulose fibers like cotton and linen use basic dyes which using washing soda and salt to set the dye. The vinegar (or salt) really doesn't do anything after the fiber is already dyed. Washing with vinegar does remove excess soap, though, and the water will wash away excess dye that is going to run.

                        Like I mentioned in my previous post, indigo is a vat dye, and isn't like the other dyes. The dark jeans so popular now have been dipped in the indigo vat multiple times to get dark, and they will have excess dye on them that crocks off on everything it touches. This has nothing to do with setting the dye. This has to do with lots of excess dye that has not been washed off. There's no way to set excess dye. Think of it like putting dry beans in a bowl. You can pile on more beans than the bowl will hold, but those beans heaped up on top will eventually fall out of the bowl when you move it because there's just no way to actually make the extra beans stay put. Anyway, there's a reason prewashed jeans became popular. It was only once you washed off the excess dye that you were finally down to the dye that was actually bonded to the fibers.

                        Anyway, it's good to know that the blue came out of the Founder's Briefcase with some water and a towel. That means the excess dye was just rubbed off the jeans, and didn't actually stain the briefcase. Good to know.
                        Last edited by BWeaves; 05-02-2017, 01:13 PM.

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