Welcome!

We're glad you are here. This is the place to ask for bag advice, help other people out, post reviews, and share photos and videos.

TOM BIHN Forums Statistics

Collapse

Topics: 14,582   Posts: 188,361   Members: 6,552   Active Members: 301
Welcome to our newest member, MerryAlcal.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I have done something to my Co-pilot...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    I have done something to my Co-pilot...

    ...but I don't know what.

    The fabric on one side of the zipper is a little fuzzy.
    Maybee it happened when I put it under the seat in front of me on a plane. But it's the Co-pilot so it can stand up without touching anything above it.

    I'm also suspecting a coat I have with zippers on the sleeves that always get cought on things. It's lucky the aubergine Co-pilot is the only bag affected.
    Have you had anything like that happen to your bag?
    Friendship is born at that moment when one man says to another: "What! You too? I thought that no one but myself . . ."-C.S. Lewis

    #2
    Ouch! Do you think it happened all at once?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

    Comment


      #3
      I'm not sure. I think I would have seen it straight away.
      Friendship is born at that moment when one man says to another: "What! You too? I thought that no one but myself . . ."-C.S. Lewis

      Comment


        #4
        Is it possible the underside of the seat you put it under had some velcro (where they attach the seat fabric to) exposed?

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by ceepee View Post
          Is it possible the underside of the seat you put it under had some velcro (where they attach the seat fabric to) exposed?
          it looks like a velcro issue to me too. Seat covers on planes are often velcroed on
          Aeronaut 30 in Aubergine/Wasabi
          Ristretto in Olive/Cayenne
          Small cafe in Plum Cordura/Olive
          Western Flyer in Black/Island
          Synapse 19 in Burnt Orange/Northwest Sky
          Smart Alec in Black/Iberian
          Synapse 25 in Red Blend/Northwest Sky
          Small Cafe bag in Red Blend/Navy (EDCB)
          Accessories:travel tray , Travel Laundry Stuff Sack, 3D Organizer Cube, Set of A30 Aether Packing Cubes, Side Effect, and a Double Organizer Pouch I use as a wallet.

          Comment


            #6
            I was thinking welcro but didn't know where my bag had come in contact with it. I need to check better under the seat in front of me. Maybee I need a mirror like they have to check under cars for contraband.
            Friendship is born at that moment when one man says to another: "What! You too? I thought that no one but myself . . ."-C.S. Lewis

            Comment


              #7
              I'd be tempted to wave a lighter over it to singe off the fuzzies. A quick pass should do it, but you risk burning the bag if you move slowly or torch the fabric too aggressively.

              Comment


                #8
                To suggest a step before flame... what about a sweater-fuzz shaver-off-er? Looks like a chubby asthma inhaler with the short part up...has a screen on it an a razor-ish thing whirring about inside. Only snips what reaches through the screen...

                Comment


                  #9
                  I would probably skim along it with scissors. But you might email TB customer support first, they could have a better solution!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Definitely not a flame on synthetic fabrics like Ballistic Nylon (or Cordura or Halcyon)!!

                    I agree with @sarah_atx. Scissors are what I use (the small sewing ones or similar) to get all the larger loose threads cut as close to the surface of the bag. The scissors need to be sharp and thin to get as close to the surface of the fabric as possible. I have some scissors on my Swiss Pocket knife and they worked great too.

                    I have used those lint shavers @Kmk has suggested and they are good to do the final touch up once you cut the larger loose threads. I even tried my electric shaver and it seems to do the job without dulling it. (Note to wives using their husband's shaver on aubergine ballistic nylon (or any non-black or grey color) - warn them before they think something is wrong with their beard )

                    I agree with @ceepee and @hillview that the hook part of the underseat velcro might be the culprit. I felt under the seat once and found that the velcro was exposed (ie the seat cover was not secured by the velcro) and it was industrial strength rough. The only other thing might be that it got wedged in a hinge (this is how I first starting figuring out how to deal with Ballistic Nylon that has been damaged).

                    You will not be able to get rid of all the frayed parts but you can make it such that no one would notice it except you (because we (I) obsess on it ).

                    Hope this helps
                    Cheers!
                    Last edited by tpnl; 04-10-2017, 02:25 PM.
                    TB Ballistic Black/Iberian Dyneema backpacks and briefcases for every occasion together with my cherished Nordic and Solar Dyneema!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Synthetic fabrics do melt very easily. To that end, a brief exposure to flame or heat is what you use when you are sealing the end of synthetic cordage or webbing (like paracord, accessory cord, or climb-rated webbing). The fuzzy parts curl up and seal nearly instantly at a brief kiss of flame. It takes a little bit longer for a solid piece of cordage or even fabric to catch. A handheld (yellow flame) lighter does not put out heat fast enough to worry about burning bag-grade fabric for at least a second or two. A hot knife is often used to cut synthetic fabrics to seal the edges.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I absolutely agree that a flame can be used for melting synthetic fabrics - including cut zipper pulls (like the paracord you mention) to keep it from fraying (I use an iron). I believe there is a TB video showing this. For a few threads, I think it might work if done skillfully and with some practice (which you obviously have )

                        But, from my experience, it can be hard to control over larger areas (either to keep from getting burnt or from over melting). Also, the OP has a large section that has been impacted. I know with my skill level (mine sucks), it would be hard for me to do (that too slowly or too aggressively that you mention in your earlier post).

                        For me, the risk is too high for non-black colors as any mistakes may result in a blackened area or even just a blackened thread end (which would make it worse and show more if a bright color like aubergine or orange) - hence, my comment not to use a flame - but to each their own (I am glad it works for you and it is a good idea. I may try to improve my skill)!

                        I agree with the hot knife for melting (I use an iron set to the synthetic temp range to seal the ends of my shoulder webbing) but I am not sure that melting is the right solution here. If one melts the fabric threads, it will look different than the rest of the weave pattern - perhaps close with good skill but different.

                        IMHO, it is whatever one is most comfortable with and I do not think there is a perfect solution

                        Hope this Helps

                        Cheers!
                        Last edited by tpnl; 04-10-2017, 03:44 PM.
                        TB Ballistic Black/Iberian Dyneema backpacks and briefcases for every occasion together with my cherished Nordic and Solar Dyneema!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Since I don't want my next thread to be "Look what I did to my Co-pilot. Warning! Disturbing pictures inside." I think I'm going to keep it away from fire.
                          I'm cutting the fuzzies with a small pair of sissors and hope it will look good. Stupid thing to happen but I thing I would be more upset about a stain of some sort.
                          Friendship is born at that moment when one man says to another: "What! You too? I thought that no one but myself . . ."-C.S. Lewis

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X