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Will the Tri-Star fit my size 12 men's shoes?

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  • Mausermama
    replied
    I'm joining in the conversation now too, because this is of great interest to me. I don't have specifically heel pain, but my plantar fascia was injured closer to the front arch of the foot (I'm horrible with specific names). I've been investigating minimal footwear and love the idea, but I live in a house with hard wood and tile flooring. I walk on concrete or asphalt when I'm outside. I get that going barefoot is best when in a natural environment, but today so much is decidedly NOT natural. Is it still ok to do the minimalist or barefoot thing, or will I end up injuring myself more?

    Most of my life I've worn Birkenstock shoes. It has only been since I started running about 4 years ago that I started to deal in foot pain. I have stopped doing complete runs and have switched to run/walks, but it is the only exercise that I actually do, so I hate to stop it. BUT I can say, I hate wearing my running shoes. I went to a running specialty store to be fitted, but they always feel a little uncomfortable to me. I am also developing a bit of a bunion now, so that is part of the issue, I assume. Anyway, I'd love to switch over to minimalist all the time, but the surfaces I walk on most are making me hesitate.

    Leave a comment:


  • Trailhiker
    replied
    Originally posted by conejo23 View Post
    Lani.....thanks for that Keen endorsement.

    Re your heal spur, I'd like to offer a suggestion. I'm the clinic director of The Egoscue Clinic in Austin, TX. We practice The Egoscue Method, which is basically using corrective exericses to bring a body back to postural balance, alleviating pain. Heel spurs happen when the body has lost postural balance and gait becomes compromised. It's a friction response, much like a callous or a blister. Bone spurs happen when the foot no longer strikes the ground as it was intended to do, thus causing excessive friction. The body responds to that friction with a protective mechanism, laying down calcium deposits to try to protect the impacted structure, and spurs begin to form.

    A great way to start working on some of this stuff on your own is with Pete Egoscue's book "Pain Free". I've lost track of how many people have told me it was of immense benefit to them. The MBTs are cool shoes, but they aren't addressing the core reason why you have the spurs in the first place. This book will help you figure out WHY you have the spurs. My suggestion would be to read the first three chapters, then start doing the exercises to promote functional loading of the foot during gait. If you have any questions about the book, I would be more than happy to assist you directly and answer your questions by phone or email, my complements.

    Sorry to take the thread off topic, and if my post here is of no interest, please feel free to just ignore it. It's not my intention to intrude, just offering some help.
    Thanx for the detour!
    And thank you for the book recomendation!
    I just ordered it and its on its way!

    Leave a comment:


  • barryblack
    replied
    Originally posted by AVService View Post
    I can get size 13 Keens in mine as well as 13 dress shoes so I think you will be fine.
    I am usually wearing my running shoes/Hiking shoes.
    Normally I stick them in the small side of the divided front pocket where the hieght may be the issue but they can always go in horizontal somewhere and then Bigfoots shoes could fit,not that I have seen him wearing any.

    Ed
    I am intereseted in that info too... Do you have a pic of that set up :=) thanks!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • crispinros
    replied
    Originally posted by AVService View Post
    I can get size 13 Keens in mine as well as 13 dress shoes so I think you will be fine.
    I am usually wearing my running shoes/Hiking shoes.
    Normally I stick them in the small side of the divided front pocket where the height may be the issue but they can always go in horizontal somewhere and then Bigfoots shoes could fit,not that I have seen him wearing any.

    Ed
    I fully agree with Ed's solution, in fat many of the times I have also adjusted my shoes in the same manner, as I am very much fond of shoes hence generally I keep on coming across such situations.

    Leave a comment:


  • conejo23
    replied
    Lani, lol, you're very kind, but here's the #1 piece of advice I give every client:

    Trust your instincts. Don't let what some supposed "expert" tells you lead you to deviate from what your instincts tell you to be true. Your body knows what it wants. The trick is to hear its request.

    I remember I had a client once, knees and feet in horrible positions, posture was just a wreck, gait was a mess, bad back pain. They asked if I thought they could run safely and my response was "um, no, let's get you walking reasonably correctly first". 99 times out of 100, that was exactly the right advice given what I saw in front of me. But God bless 'em, their instincts said 'i think I'll feel better if I go running', so they did. And they felt better when they did it!

    All the 'rules' and theories are great, but trust YOUR BODY'S wisdom well before mine.

    Keep on rockin'.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lani
    replied
    Wow... I bow to your wisdom! /bow bow bow

    Leave a comment:


  • conejo23
    replied
    Kmcg....you're most welcome. Here's something you can try for your plantar fascitis:

    Plantar Fascia Stretch

    It's not going to address the core reason why the fascia on the bottom of your foot is getting constricted and tight, but it will help keep it more pliable and stretched out, which should improve the symptom. If you (or anyone else) has any questions, please feel free to email me at the email address in my profile. I'm happy to help.

    Lani, that's a matter on which reasonable people can disagree, lol. From my personal and clinical experience, I'm not a fan of shoes that alter our fundamental gait mechanics in the attempt to present a demand over and above normal gait, or to somehow modify the nature of the demand our bodies receive during normal gait. I'm a big fan of barefoot. We folks at Egoscue were HUGE fans of the minimalist footwear movement before it became a movement. Pete Egoscue played a role in the development of the Nike Free, which was a step in the right direction. We've been huge fans of Vibram FiveFinger shoes for years. I'm wearing a pair of them right now! In my opinion, the more you allow your foot to do what a foot is designed to do, the better. Most shoes are pretty rigid and encapsulate the foot, preventing it from flexing, extending and rotating the way a foot will naturally do when barefoot. Basically, they crutch the feet. And what happens to a body part that is crutched, does it grow stronger or weaker?

    A lot of people tell folks with plantar fascitis, for example, to wear expensive custom orthotics or special shoes. Me? My approach is a bit different. Help address the reason WHY the person has plantar fascitis, then I'll tell them to go find some grass nearby and walk for 5-10 minutes a day barefoot. And if you live near a beach with deep sand? Perfect. Go walk barefoot in that as close to daily as you can. It's like weightlifting for your feet, and they'll quickly grow stronger.

    That said, pretty is as pretty does. Trust your instincts. All the theory in the world is great, but if you feel better, stronger and more functional wearing a certain kind of shoe, then wear it. But my personal and professional advice is to consistently wear as little shoe (in terms of structure and built in 'support') as possible.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lani
    replied
    Out of curiosity, do you still think it's OK for people with a perfectly healthy gait to wear rocker bottom heels like MBTs? I really like the way they feel.

    PS: I bought the book and it's in the mail from Amazon now. I'll go watch the videos as well. Thanks for the link.

    Leave a comment:


  • kmcg
    replied
    Good info, so thanks for veering off in the direction of feet! Plantar fascitis is my one big problem when I travel. It first started on a long trip when I was walking more than 5 miles a day; suddenly one morning I could barely walk. Not a great situation when you're supposed to be running around Europe. I now try to integrate more - and more vigorous - walking into my daily routine before a trip, but there's no guaranty that will prevent the PF from emerging again. I'll check out the video and book - surely there's more I can learn on the topic.

    Oh, and I like Keens too, but I wouldn't expect them to be ideal for narrow feet. They're fat little buggers!

    Leave a comment:


  • conejo23
    replied
    You're most welcome.

    I'm not trying to hijack my own thread here, and I'm certainly not trying to solicit business. Just hate to see people hurting when there's usually a pretty simple fix available. If anyone has any questions about their own situation, feel free to email me (i'll go see if my email is in my profile). I'm happy to help in any way I can.

    Leave a comment:


  • roadrunner
    replied
    Originally posted by conejo23 View Post
    Lani.....you're most welcome.

    the plantar fascitis happens for the exact same reason, compromised foot strike. With a normal level of demand, you may have just experienced that compromise as feet that were sore at the end of the day. But as a runner, your margin for postural error was much less. The more demand we present to our bodies, the more postural compromise's impact on joint function becomes amplified.

    You'll dig the book. In the meantime, here's a short video from our VP of Therapy Protocol talking about the linkages between postural integrity, running, and doing so pain free. It's focused on back pain, but the principles apply to any kind of pain. Enjoy.
    thanks for sharing your wisdom. Video clips were great. I think I'll pick up the book as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • conejo23
    replied
    Lani.....you're most welcome.

    the plantar fascitis happens for the exact same reason, compromised foot strike. With a normal level of demand, you may have just experienced that compromise as feet that were sore at the end of the day. But as a runner, your margin for postural error was much less. The more demand we present to our bodies, the more postural compromise's impact on joint function becomes amplified.

    You'll dig the book. In the meantime, here's a short video from our VP of Therapy Protocol talking about the linkages between postural integrity, running, and doing so pain free. It's focused on back pain, but the principles apply to any kind of pain. Enjoy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lani
    replied
    Wow... thank you so much for your advice, conejo23! I'll pick up the book.

    For what it's worth, I think the whole ruckus started with plantar fasciitis on my right foot; I'd had it off and on for years and years and years. And then I went through a spate of weight loss and a ton of fitness... including jogging, which I've really liked in the past. But I developed such painful heels (esp on my right) that about 6 years ago, after finishing the San Francisco half-marathon then sitting on the shuttle bus to get back to the finish line for the full marathon (we did the route #1, which started at the same starting area but finished at 13.1-marker), and I was horrified to discover that my feet were totally frozen in pain and I could barely even walk, they were so bad.

    I went to a podiatrist and tried to do a bunch of exercises and I finally gave up and let him give me a cortisone shot. I don't know why I waited so long, because the relief was almost immediate.

    I've been pretty ginger since then. When I wear regular running shoes for any great length, I could feel the pain coming on.

    All that's contributed to my becoming more sedentary, and gaining my weight back... and so now I have back problems (which I know comes from not keeping my core in shape)... and MBTs help a great deal with that.

    BUT.... I will read the book! It will be great not to have to deal with foot pain! THANK YOU!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • conejo23
    replied
    Lani.....thanks for that Keen endorsement.

    Re your heal spur, I'd like to offer a suggestion. I'm the clinic director of The Egoscue Clinic in Austin, TX. We practice The Egoscue Method, which is basically using corrective exericses to bring a body back to postural balance, alleviating pain. Heel spurs happen when the body has lost postural balance and gait becomes compromised. It's a friction response, much like a callous or a blister. Bone spurs happen when the foot no longer strikes the ground as it was intended to do, thus causing excessive friction. The body responds to that friction with a protective mechanism, laying down calcium deposits to try to protect the impacted structure, and spurs begin to form.

    A great way to start working on some of this stuff on your own is with Pete Egoscue's book "Pain Free". I've lost track of how many people have told me it was of immense benefit to them. The MBTs are cool shoes, but they aren't addressing the core reason why you have the spurs in the first place. This book will help you figure out WHY you have the spurs. My suggestion would be to read the first three chapters, then start doing the exercises to promote functional loading of the foot during gait. If you have any questions about the book, I would be more than happy to assist you directly and answer your questions by phone or email, my complements.

    Sorry to take the thread off topic, and if my post here is of no interest, please feel free to just ignore it. It's not my intention to intrude, just offering some help.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lani
    replied
    Keen makes GREAT footwear. And if you like wearing those webbed sandals, Keen makes the best ones because they put huge "bumper guards" by your toes. A lot of other sandals are open-toed and you can stub your toes or easily pick up pebbles from the front opening.

    When you go read the footwear tips page of Rick Steves' web site (on his community Graffiti Wall), a lot of people also recommend Keens.

    I still have some Keens in my closet. The only reason I don't wear them now is because I wear MBTs to keep my heel spur at bay.

    Leave a comment:

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