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  1. #1
    Forum Member cucumber.sandwich's Avatar
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    Using Bihn bags as panniers

    Is anyone using a TB bag as a pannier? If so, what attachments are you using?

  2. #2
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    Greetings,
    What I've done is outfit each bike with a sturdy rear rack for use when I'm at home (not traveling). I've got three bicycles and each one has a very different rear rack from the others. I like to choose my bag based on what I need to carry. I got a bicycle bungie net and replaced the hooks with carabiners. Hooks can become tangled in the gears or spokes or slip and then the load is not secure. With the bungie net, I can attach any bag in several different positions on the rack. I've got two bungie nets that I have adapted with the carabiners and I like them a lot.

    When traveling, I love the nylon front and rear bicycle panniers from Vaude. They come with attachments already. My first panniers were ballistic fabric with fiddly velcro straps that attached to the rack. The straps were very annoying and the ballistic fabric was not waterproof in any way, it absorbed water and that added weight. Riding in the rain is very enjoyable if I'm warm, but extra weight is tiring.

    With the bungie or any strap, watch for wear on your bag. If you put your nice bag in a cheap dry bag, it protects from dirt and provides waterproof protection too. Good luck! elisa

  3. #3
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    Wire panniers are sturdy and too common for bike thieves to take the time to dismantle them.

    They are either affixed to the front or/and side of the bikes' back rack.


    Many Tom Bihn customers who are also bike riders use them, to secure items that could slip out of the wire panniers, the Shop Bag is just the ticket
    Lightweight, portable and available in all kind of colors. They can be secured to the wire pannier with Carabiners or S-Biners.

    For quick errands or ultra minimalists bike users: front panniers can easily accommodate, the Side Effect, the Side Kick, The Travel Cubelet, Cubelet, 3D OC and Packing Cube Shoulder Bag.

    For the commuter: the Cafe Bags, the Daylight Briefcase, the Co-Pilot and the S19 would most surely fit a typical wire side panniers.

    I do not know if the bigger Tom Bihn Briefcases and Backpacks would fit. Current bike users of any of those Bags, please share your experience.

    The third kind of bags are Tom Bihn lightweight Backpacks, the Backing Cube Backpack, the Daylight Backpack and the Luminary can easily be worn when riding.
    Last edited by backpack; 05-27-2018 at 10:17 AM.

  4. #4
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    Using Bihn bags as panniers

    Quote Originally Posted by backpack View Post
    Wire panniers are sturdy and too common for bike thieves to take the time to dismantle them.

    They are either affixed to the front or/and side of the bikes' back rack.


    Many Tom Bihn customers who are also bike riders use them, to secure items that could slip out of the wire panniers, the Shop Bag is just the ticket
    Lightweight, portable and available in all kind of colors. They can be secured to the wire pannier with Carabiners or S-Biners.

    For quick errands or ultra minimalists bike users: front panniers can easily accommodate, the Side Effect, the Side Kick, The Travel Cubelet, Cubelet, 3D OC and Packing Cube Shoulder Bag.

    For the commuter: the Cafe Bags, the Daylight Briefcase, the Co-Pilot and the S19 would most surely fit a typical wire side panniers.

    I do not know if the bigger Tom Bihn Briefcases and Backpacks would fit. Current bike users of any of those Bags, please share your experience.

    The third kind of bags are Tom Bihn lightweight Backpacks, the Backing Cube Backpack, the Daylight Backpack and the Luminary can easily be worn when riding.
    Iím confused by the term wire panniers. Do you mean baskets? If not please share a pic or link. Iím very curious. Thx!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #5
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    I apologize, it is indeed wire baskets.

    In French, panniers means baskets, which are traditionally made of reed, that is what I said wire panniers, I used both languages, without a thought.
    Last edited by backpack; 05-28-2018 at 10:24 AM.

  6. #6
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    A TB pop tote often ends up in my bikes front basket.

    I"d be over the moon if TB came out with a pannier option. But for right now I'm using some super cheap panniers from Ikea.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kelly S View Post
    A TB pop tote often ends up in my bikes front basket.

    I"d be over the moon if TB came out with a pannier option. But for right now I'm using some super cheap panniers from Ikea.
    Years ago, a good numbers of forum members, followed the trend of urban cycling, that emerged in the U.S, from the influence of the same worldwide practice that has been going on forever.

    At the time, many members made the request for a Tom Bihn pannier, to which the Crew responded by giving links to U.S quality panniers manufacturers.

    Of course, as always, I don't remember the date, the name of the thread or any precise info.

    No surprise here, yesterday, I forgot that I posted a question about charger, on one thread and, reposted it on another.

    Moriond, Help!

  8. #8
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    I remember the thread titled "Bihnions who are also cyclists"

  9. #9
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    This is timely! On Saturday I picked up a new ebike. It's rigged with front and rear racks and came with a long bungee cord that hooks neatly into the front rack (I guess I am left to my own devices when it comes to the rear, doh!).

    Not ever having used a rack, I tossed my keys and a TB Clear Organizer Pouch (loaded with my ID and some cash into a TB #2 Stuff Sack) and then placed the Stuff Sack on the front rack secured by the bungee - and with a TB Key Strap hooked onto the bungee for good measure.

    A few miles into the ride, I noticed a funny noise but rode on for a while wondering what the heck could it be? Double doh! When I stopped, I discovered that the Stuff Sack had slid down and was rubbing on the tire. I can't tell you how far or how fast I rode with that poor Stuff Sack being assaulted by the tire, other than it was embarrassingly long ways.

    But the good news is that there isn't a mark on the Sack. Not one! It's perfectly fine. And the tire doesn't look any worse for the experience either.

    The bad news is that when I stopped to investigate. Just standing there straddling the bike mind you, it started to lean (all 60 lbs. of it) and we just toppled over in slow motion. But not a mark on me either so basically it's all good news!

    Thanks TB for making such awesome products. I'm off to search for a thread entitled "Bihnions who cycle badly."

  10. #10
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    Beeing a lifelong cyclist, I can share a tiny primer on bike racks.

    They are ideal to secure a bag like the Mini and Small Yeoman Duffels.

    I don't know why they only included one bungee cord, but you need 2 for each bag on each rack. One secures the bag length and the other the width.
    Another solution is to buy a bungee mesh, it is essentially elastic mesh fabric with two bungee hooks on each sides, it covers the whole bag.
    If it comes in various sizes bring the bag, so the fit is snugly.

    A cheap way to convert the bike racks into bike panniers is, to buy the plastic crates that can be used as a file cabinet and, secure them with 2 bungee cords, each.

    Do not buy the folding type because, one road bumps could weaken one side, causing the box to start folding on its own and the bungee cord to become loose.


    Wire baskets can be installed and lined with the Tom Bihn Shop Bags to secure small items inside.

    Some people use the Side Effect and I think the Side Kick could also work, secured to the handle bar with two Short Key Straps on each outside O-ring.


    The Small Cafe Bag, the Travel Cubelet and the Cubelet can be worn cross body when riding.

    For safety, I always used the waist strap on the Small Cafe Bag and the shoulder strap placed, cross body and as tight as possible.

    It is possible to use 2 Simple Straps, one cross body, one as a waist strap on both the Travel Cubelet and Cubelet

    The Side Kick and the Side Effect have on their sides, unobtrusive webbing loops to which you can attach the optional 1" / 25mm Gatekeeper Waist Strap, using our now-ubiquitous Gatekeeper clips.


    I know, I sound like an old fashioned 1900's lady, who just took up the scandalous new mean of transportation with my bike bloomers. Smilie

    Safety, is the reason for single minded idea of securing everything twice, checking all secure point 3 or 4 times before riding, pulling and pushing the items to mimic road bumps, before going on my way.


    Make sure that a you have a minimalist repair kit, you can get them already filled up at bike shops or pick and choose what you want to bring and fit it into a 3D Organizer Cube or a Cubelet.

    Buy a helmet and wear a helmet every single time.

    Have loads and loads and loads of fun!

  11. #11
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    I have a pair of folding Nashbar canvas Panniers I bought in college; they are designed to accommodate a paper grocery bag and will accommodate the WF standing on end. It would need to have a bungee wrapped to keep it from flopping outward too far. They will just barely fit in the WF when folded so they can be carried with. I don't use it regularly, but I think it is better than having lots of clips and hooks protruding form a TB bag all the time.

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