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  1. #1
    Forum Member kemote's Avatar
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    Guide's Pack Backpacking

    I have a Guide's Pack currently en route to me and I have big plans for this bag. Before I take it on its first adventure, I wanted to find out from other users how they pack/use it. I am mostly planning on taking it out for day hikes but I was wondering if anyone has done more than that - say a weekend backpacking trip? I'm looking to pack some "ultralight" things such as a tent and sleep system, cooking system, water filtration, etc. If you have experience with this, how did the Guide's Pack perform for you?

    I understand that this isn't the lightest pack to be doing this with or has the biggest capacity but everything in my research says this should be do-able for a few days of backpacking. Also, I have foregone the padded hip belt to save on costs and weight (I will be using a side pocket and leads pocket so weight has to be cut somewhere). Does anyone find that the hip belt is absolutely necessary? Please chime in and let me know how your Guide's Park has been working out for you in the wilderness!
    Last edited by kemote; 07-26-2020 at 06:21 AM.
    S25 | GP | WF | YD | MCB

  2. #2
    Forum Member melminimalist's Avatar
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    You donít need the padded hip belt, Iíve found if you use a sternum strap a hip belt is more of just a stabilizer, a one-inch webbing hip belt is all I have on my big hike pack. On to the Guideís pack for an overnight, well...I just wouldnít, or better yet couldnít. Iím an ultralight hiker (base weight 8lbs) so when I say my stuff doesnít take up a lot of capacity youíll know I mean it. But, when I test packed for an overnight with the GP I just couldnít get it to fit in. You may be able to do it with something strapped to the outside of the pack. I personally donít like the liability of having an important item outside my pack unless itís encased in a mesh pocket. I think thatís inherently what the GP is missing to make it a functional overnight hike pack, outter mesh or outter bungee loops. Itís a terrific daypack first hiking and I just absolutely love the feel of the materials, it looks incredible like a real classic backpacker look. The brain cell and built in pockets are perfect for organizing your bits and bobs. Itís just not quit enough for an overnight and the fabric has no give or stretch to it to accommodate shapely items. Iíll give you an example of what test packed out so youíll have an idea of what all I tried to pack.

    SMD lunar solo tent
    Klymit static V pad
    Hammock gear econ 20 degree quilt
    Toaks 550 ml pot
    Ziploc with 6 stakes
    Headlamp
    Ziploc with trowel and TP
    Sawyer filter
    Rain jacket and rain pants
    2 one-liter smart water bottles
    Ziploc baggie of food

    I actually filmed a video of me trying to test pack it out if your interested, itís up on youtube, same name as my username here. Let me know if you have any other questions or I can help.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    "Not all who wander are lost"
    "Love people, use things, because the opposite never works" - The Minimalists
    Synapse 25 in Olive, Aubergine Side Effect, UV A30 PCBP, Sitka PCSB

  3. #3
    Forum Member kemote's Avatar
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    Yeah, I have seen your videos on the GP when I was doing my research on whether I wanted to buy one or not. I still bought it but thank you for your input here. Your packing list is not far off from what I would be bringing on a 2-3 day hike and I am surprised to hear that all didn't fit or work for you. I guess I will find out for myself but I really want this bag to work as I too love the materials and look of this pack.
    S25 | GP | WF | YD | MCB

  4. #4
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    @kemote , I have to concur with @melminimalist . While the Guide's Pack is gorgeous, and I have coveted one for quite some time, you may be hard pressed even as an ultralight backpacker to fit all of your overnight equipment inside a Guide's Pack, particularly depending on the season. When I was doing longer distance lightweight multi-day backpacking, I finally settled on a ULA Circuit. The necessity/preference of a padded hipbelt may vary. I like one to have the option for distributing the weight on my hips, since I am petite, plus I am partial to a belt with hip pockets, so I can store snacks/chapstick/hand sanitizer, etc, in easy reach. At one point I had added on some ultralight pockets from a different manufacturer than TB to the belt on a different TB pack. But it's all personal preference. Wishing you many happy adventures with your Guide's Pack! Please post photos of some of your future outings. Smilie
    "Do one thing every day that scares you." - Eleanor Roosevelt
    "Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it." -Ferris Bueller

  5. #5
    Forum Member BigBadD's Avatar
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    I have a Shadow Guide as opposed to the Guide’s Pack, but should be similar experience. When hiking on rough terrain with resonable full capacity/load then I do appreciate wearing the padded hip belt. This helps support the load as well as restricts some unbalance. I did struggle at first with capacity, being smaller than my previous Karrimor rucksack which finally died after 20+ years of use. But it made me better plan what I really needed to carry, and especially when hiking with others, what we can share between us. Also as I get that bit older I am not often hiking for more than one overnight stop before returning to some comforts!
    Last edited by BigBadD; 07-26-2020 at 08:27 AM.

  6. #6
    Forum Member melminimalist's Avatar
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    Guide's Pack Backpacking

    Quote Originally Posted by kemote View Post
    Yeah, I have seen your videos on the GP when I was doing my research on whether I wanted to buy one or not. I still bought it but thank you for your input here. Your packing list is not far off from what I would be bringing on a 2-3 day hike and I am surprised to hear that all didn't fit or work for you. I guess I will find out for myself but I really want this bag to work as I too love the materials and look of this pack.
    I will say I did not compress down my quilt with a compression stuff sack, just the regular one that came with it, if you buy a compression sack for your sleep system and tent then that could definitely buy you some liters, also, I think a hammock and tarp set-up would also fit better, or even a bivy/tarp. I did not have the side pockets, so if you pick up side pockets and put food/water in those then itís also possible to free up more liters for an overnight. Man, I really wanted to make that bag work for me too. Let us know if you end up getting it to work for you and pics please!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    "Not all who wander are lost"
    "Love people, use things, because the opposite never works" - The Minimalists
    Synapse 25 in Olive, Aubergine Side Effect, UV A30 PCBP, Sitka PCSB

  7. #7
    Forum Member kemote's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by melminimalist View Post
    Let us know if you end up getting it to work for you and pics please!
    Yeah, I will for sure. My plan is to not use a stuff sack for the quilt, I plan on packing that first into the bag so I can cram it in all the nooks and crannies of bottom of the bag and then pack on top from there. I just have to hope my bag doesn't get wet or I am kind of screwed. I am currently weighing if I would rather have a hammock or a tent. Hammock will be lighter but will most likely require two quilts (top and bottom) but a tent requires a sleeping pad and footprint so there are pros and cons to both. Either way, I am almost positive I can make this work.
    S25 | GP | WF | YD | MCB

  8. #8
    Forum Member BigBadD's Avatar
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    After many years of experience of wet UK weather, with a top opening single compartment rucksack (and it is a definite advantage of this style of rucksack) the first thing I put in is a heavy duty bin bag, and then everything goes into the protection of the bin bag. I have no issues with TB design, build or material quality, but no bag is 100% waterproof - and nothing worse than kit being wet after a day’s hiking. Hope this helps!

  9. #9
    Forum Member kemote's Avatar
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    Good call, I have looked into lightweight pack liners to help with the waterproofing. Just purchased a nylofume pack liner and will twist it off with my quilt inside it and any other items I need to 100% keep dry at the bottom of my pack. May even look into a stuff sack like Mel mentioned if I find the quilt takes up too much room.
    Last edited by kemote; 07-26-2020 at 11:10 AM.

  10. #10
    Forum Member BigBadD's Avatar
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    Dedicated pack liner products are good, but avoid to pay over the odds as any reinforced refuse bag, such as for gardening, will work.
    With bigger volume rucksacks and in the past doing some quite remote hiking I would use a bright orange survival bag as the waterproof liner. The waterproof liner bag does not need to be sized for the rucksack but can be any bigger size.

    For bulky padded items I agree that stuff sacks are really useful. But I would recommend that the stuff sack has robust compression straps to efficiently compact the contents.

  11. #11
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    I haven't used the Guide's Pack for this purpose but I have looked at it with an eye for using it for those reasons. I just wanted to chime in and say that the capacity of the bag is fine - with the side pockets it comes out to around 36L I think? I've done an 8 day hike with a pack that size, carrying tent/sleeping bag, so it's quite doable. My only concern with the Guide's Pack is the fit and suspension, as I'm curious how well it would work for me compared to my other packs. I haven't tested it because I'd like the whole thing in a color that isn't in stock, so I haven't purchased one to try it on yet.

  12. #12
    Volunteer Moderator bartleby's Avatar
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    Guide's Pack Backpacking

    I've done weekend hikes with the GP but unfortunately not with a tent and sleeping bag so I can't contribute to the capacity issues. What I want to echo is the need for protection against humidity. Not only from rain but also from sweat as my experience is that when you really do strenous hikes sweat might penetrate through the backpanel (it's not the fabric but the seams). The most simple and cheapest solution is to use a garbage bag inside the backpack to keep things absolutely dry. I also use a raincover.

    The second thing I want to add refers to the hipbelt: My personal opinion is that it does help a lot to take weight of your shoulders which I consider especially important when you carry heavy loads for longer hikes. It might depend on the individual constitution (I'm 6', 160 lbs) but generally I think it makes hiking a lot more comfortable. For the same reason I would strongly recommend to use hiking poles.

    Last edited by bartleby; 07-26-2020 at 12:54 PM.
    ...spread joy in your neighbourhood (and not Corona!) Smilie Rainbow Cheers
    current bags: Smart Alec, Guide's Pack, Guide's Edition S25, Luminary 15, Daylight Backpack, Aeronaut 45, Tri-Star, Road Buddy 36, Daylight Briefcase, Small Yeoman Duffel, bits and pieces

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by BowTrek View Post
    I haven't tested it because I'd like the whole thing in a color that isn't in stock, so I haven't purchased one to try it on yet.
    FYI: On another thread, Darcy has said there are no plans to produce the Guide's Pack in any color other than Navy.

  14. #14
    Forum Member kemote's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buffalonian View Post
    FYI: On another thread, Darcy has said there are no plans to produce the Guide's Pack in any color other than Navy.
    And word is, stock is getting low and they don't think they'll be making new ones for a while.
    S25 | GP | WF | YD | MCB

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