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  1. #1
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    Tom Bihn Logo: Which Airplane?

    As a private pilot, I've been wondering which historic airplane is the basis for the Tom Bihn logo. I think it is the Curtiss Condor CO, or Condor I. It had two engines, could carry 18 passengers, and a wingspan of 91 feet. It was a big airplane in its day. Another version was an Army bomber.

    Here's a picture; am I right?

    Tom Bihn Logo: Which Airplane?-eastern-air-transport-condor-i-jpg

  2. #2
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    my money's on a Farman F120

  3. #3
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    Mathew.....yours is a better candidate. I never heard of it....unusual craft!

  4. #4
    Forum Member LordBute's Avatar
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    I cheated and checked the FAQ that says it's a Farman F-121 Jabir.
    Friendship is born at that moment when one man says to another: "What! You too? I thought that no one but myself . . ."-C.S. Lewis

  5. #5
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    Ah, I didn't think to check the FAQs. It was manufactured by the French. No wonder it is exotic looking. The pilot sat in an open cockpit on top of the wing! Tough job in weather. Maybe that changed in later models.

  6. #6
    TOM BIHN Crew (we work here) Darcy's Avatar
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    Mathew's got it: the plane in our logo is a Farman Jabiru F120

    Here's a photo of a poster hanging in our factory that shows the interior of the Farman F120:

    Tom Bihn Logo: Which Airplane?-jabiru-interior-jpg
    Current Carry: The Hero's Journey, Skookum Dog Citizen Canine, Founder's Briefcase, Synapse 19 (day hikes), Guide's Pack (longer day hikes), Yeoman Duffel (winter/emergency stuff for the car), Aeronaut 30 (travel), Night Flight Travel Duffel (camera bag), Moveable Feast + Shop Bags (food)

  7. #7
    Forum Member LordBute's Avatar
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    I think I read everything on the website when I was waiting for my first bag (pilot) to make it's way to Sweden.
    Friendship is born at that moment when one man says to another: "What! You too? I thought that no one but myself . . ."-C.S. Lewis

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by LordBute View Post
    I cheated and checked the FAQ that says it's a Farman F-121 Jabir.
    You could make your own to-scale model from this web page. See the 06.06.14 entry for 1/72 Farman F-121 Jabiru that links to this pdf

    Take a look at the pictures in the PDF file. I've screen-captured one for upload:
    Tom Bihn Logo: Which Airplane?-tbplane-jpg

    HTH

    moriond

    ETA: The PDF file I linked is well worth reading, and has several other pictures of the scale model. I'll excerpt a short section of text from the beginning titled "History", but I also liked the conclusion where the author of the document speculated about flying in this plane in the company of Hemingway, Camus, and Antoine de St. Exupéry.

    History

    In my long and arduous search to find the ugliest aircraft of all time, I have frequently comes across blogs about the Farman Jabiru containing such phrases “horrible” or “the flying whale” and even “that is just plain butt ugly”. Now if they were talking about an earlier incarnation, the F-120 Jabiru tri-motor, which has an uncowled radial engine on the nose, then I might have to agree that that beast was homely. But there were in fact many different Jabirus, and this one, the Farman F-121, is my favourite. That rounded nose, with curved windows in it, is so obviously copied from art deco architecture of the period that it looks like Le Corbusier has got at an aircraft. If it were British, it would probably have been called the Farman Odeon, from the many Odeon cinemas of that period in Britain which all adopted the curved corner and gave their name to the “Odeon style” of building. They call it ugly. I say it is beautiful.

    Jabiru in French means 'Stork', and while it has some of that bird's tall stance, its nose suggests 'Rhino' would be more appropriate. It was derived from the Goliath biplane bomber, with which it shared the panoramic view from the cabin front. The clipped elliptical wing sits on the shoulders of a massive, deep fuselage which could carry nine passengers. The pilot and co- pilot commanded the thing from on high, hanging out in the breeze from a tiny cockpit. I don't know if there was any internal connection between cockpit and cabin. On long flights, I would hope so.

    There are four 180 hp Hispano-Suiza 8Ac inline engines in tandem pairs at each side of the cabin at the end of small stub-wing which also served as the base for the landing gear. The colossus won several competitions for transport in France, serving Northern and Eastern European routes, including the 1923 French Grand Prix des Avions Transports and 500,000 Francs. Four of the beasts cruised the skies of Europe for the Farman airline in the late 1920s. Heavy bomber types, torpedo bombers and even escort fighters were proposed. And I am surprised it didn't turn up in one form or other during the Spanish civil war. Just about every other type of aircraft did. However the Jabiru was never successful and was being outdone by Fokker F-VIIs by the late 1920s.
    Last edited by moriond; 02-28-2017 at 11:04 AM.

  9. #9
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    I spent my childhood dragging my grandfather (well i say drag, in retrospect I'm sure he loved it as much as i did) around flight museums. Unique looking pre war European models were our favourite.
    Thanks for reminding me of some good times.

  10. #10
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    In the three engine version, the 3rd engine was hung above the nose passenger compartment (must have been pretty noisy down below), which then obliged the pilots to sit, as before, on top, in the wing structure, but right behind the 3rd engine. So not only were they exposed to the elements, they were also treated to the prop wash from the 3rd engine! Men of iron, airplanes of wood and fabric......

    Speaking of aircraft museums, if you ever get close to the USAF Museum in Dayton, be sure and visit it, and allow a whole day if you can.

  11. #11
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    So the next question is, why the Farman F.120?

  12. #12
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    Further speaking of aircraft museums: if you're in the UK, visit the Shuttleworth Collection at Old Warden, where you can see aircraft that make the Jabiru look like the Starship Enterprise. And if it's a fine evening with not too strong a wind you can even see them flying:

    Tom Bihn Logo: Which Airplane?-x13-114-jpg

  13. #13
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    Oops: meant to add, that's a Bristol Boxkite, from around 1909. That round cylindrical thing right behind the pilot is the fuel tank. If you want to go up as a passenger, there's no seat: you have to sit on the leading edge of the lower wing, holding on to a spar, with your legs dangling in space.

    And to think, I grumble when I can't get a window seat....

  14. #14
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    The rapid development of aviation from the Wright Brothers achievement of controlled powered flight is just amazing.

  15. #15
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    Are those lawn chairs screwed to the floor? I'm assuming no seat belts?

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