Shop Tom Bihn
1-800-729-9607
emailus@tombihn.com
TOM BIHN Forums: Community discussion on travel bags, laptop bags, and backpacks. TOM BIHN has been designing and making bags since 1972. The best materials and innovative construction.

User Tag List

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 74
  1. #16
    Forum Member bchaplin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1,622
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    No announcement today (Friday, May 12), apparently. My guess is that there is a lot of behind-the-scenes back-and-forth about this. The number of routes affected would probably be much larger than the Middle East ban, and the logistics are staggering, as many people transit through Europe from other destinations.

    And @Denises, thanks for the info. That's good to hear!
    It probably wouldn't be worth it to take an insurance policy just for my Kindle, but if I was in a situation where my personal laptop had to come along, that would be a different story. As it is now, I rely on airline compensation and my credit card's policy in the case of a lost checked bag, but I rarely check bags, so I haven't given it much consideration.
    ----
    All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.
    Edmund Burke

  2. #17
    Forum Member PaulT00's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    By the seaside, England
    Posts
    374
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Denises View Post
    The travel insurer I use, one of the biggest in New Zealand, has recently said they will cover electronics in checked baggage on those routes where they can't be taken in the cabin. I'm guessing this will eventually impact the cost of insurance.
    The problem is, it's not just the cost of damage to the kit, it's the consequential losses, wasted time and inconvenience if travelling for business etc. Going somewhere to do a presentation, work with another organisation, attend a training course etc? What happens if the kit becomes unusable on the way? Years ago I was in a position where two PC base units had to be transported UK->Italy to run some testing with a partner company, and could not be shipped but needed to be accompanied - the PCs had some very specialist software installed on them, along with some sensitive data. On the way back, one of the machines (which was well packaged, and checked) fell victim to water damage due to a problem with the hold stowage - the container was left exposed to a major rainstorm during loading, and the hardware was ruined. Fortunately we had taken security copies of the irreplaceable data generated during the testing, but the PC was junk. Admittedly this was some years ago, and often there are better solutions involving the internet these days to secure information, but if this goes through we're definitely into the land of contingency plans, workarounds, multiple backups, hassle and increased costs.
    Last edited by PaulT00; 05-12-2017 at 07:46 AM.
    A45CC K CQPC 3DCCQKTTMCBTT PCSBSCBTT CQPC PQBPQK LT SE TSS4TTQKS19 TT P3DCCTS PP BBLCBCP TTRi QK NFTD A30DLBC

  3. #18
    Volunteer Moderator
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    2,910
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Like most people, I have configured my laptop to allow me to be as productive as I can be. Over the years, I have migrated between several Mac laptops. I used to have years of history (documents, images, video and music) on my Mac, and migrations to new machines used to be a chore. With the most recent migration, I archived much of that to an external drive. More recent documents are in a cloud. Still, it takes me a good part of a day to get a new MacBook set up -- installing applications, setting up access to accounts, etc.

    If my MacBook gets lost or becomes unusable in travel, replacing it at my destination (assuming I can even purchase a new MacBook at my destination) and getting it setup (assuming I have a USB stick with the building blocks to enable me to setup that new MacBook) sounds absolutely awful! In terms of insurance coverage in the event of loss or damage (or delay), the value of my time and that of others impacted by such a situation may far exceeds the replacement cost of the technology.

    Thank you, @PaulT00, for the warning about water damage.

    On a related note, it takes me back to a time in the mid-1980's. We were connecting through some country in Europe. Due to security concerns, you had to visually identify your checked bags on the tarmac before you boarded the plane in order for the bags to get loaded onto the plane. It was pouring down, and I remember that we found at our destination that the contents of the bags had gotten wet.

    Anyhow, I am imagining that an Ortlieb bag inside of a Pelican case may not be a bad approach for anyone who finds themselves in a situation where they have to check in their technology. Good luck if you find yourself in such a situation!
    -m

  4. #19
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    500
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This will happen in some form or fashion. Combined with the possibility of data searches at airports (and data searches internationally by other countries that aren't publicized) along with hotel and luggage thefts, everyone needs a back up plan for their data and uncommon applications.

    Use some sort of cloud solution to back up your data. This has the added advantage of version control as you are actually working off a central document (spreadsheet, powerpoint etc.) The cloud solution could be Dropbox, Box, SpiderOak, Google Drive or a host of other services. You can also easily set up a NAS (Network Attached Storage) that you own that is accessible via the internet.

    For a couple of hundred $$, you can buy a "PC on a stick" that incorporates an entire PC in a form somewhere between the size of a very large USB stick and a small portable backup drive. Some, like the one from InFocus Kangaroo, have a full assortment of ports to allow you to plug in keyboards, mice and monitors. At least for the foreseeable future, these PCs should be allowed in-cabin.

    In any case, we need to understand that these device requirements will be fluid, so we need to be ready to check virtually all electronics - regardless of where we are flying to or from. I see Pelican and others coming out with more specific cases for devices.

    Don't forget to take a book or two - but be ready to take them out of your carry-on to flip through the pages.
    When in trouble, obfuscate.

  5. #20
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    131
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Let us hope saner minds prevail: DHS is talking with European officials about this today (Friday.)

    If not, flying via Canada, Mexico, or the Caribbean (Bermuda is easy from New York and there's a direct BA flight to Gatwick) could be a workaround for people who don't want to give up their devices.

  6. #21
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,124
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm currently in Italy and following this closely since I don't return to the U.S. until the end of June.

    What I have been told by other travelers who have traveled on the airlines already affected is this: When you check in, you go to a separate area where your electronics are catalogued, wrapped, and put in a special bin in the hold. You can still carry on your bags. When you arrive, you show your boarding pass, get your electronics, check to make sure everything is there, and sign for it. It takes an average extra 45 minutes.

    Not sure if this is what will happen if there is a ban on European flights as that affects way more people that flying to the Middle East.
    Editor--One Bag, One World: News, Reviews & Community for Light Travelers. http://www.1bag1world.com

    Aeronaut(2), Tri-Star(2) Cadet , Large Cafe Bag, Travel Tray, Travel Money Belt, Absolute Straps(3), Side Effect, Clear Quarter Packing Cubes (2), 3D Organizer Cubes (4), Aeronaut & Tri-Star Packing Cubes, Clear Organizer Wallet, numerous Organizer Pouches,, Guardian Dual Function Light, Vertical Netbook Cache, Nexus 7 Cache, RFID Passport Pouch, numerous Key Straps.

  7. #22
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    500
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by turnleftbrighteyes View Post
    Let us hope saner minds prevail: DHS is talking with European officials about this today (Friday.)

    If not, flying via Canada, Mexico, or the Caribbean (Bermuda is easy from New York and there's a direct BA flight to Gatwick) could be a workaround for people who don't want to give up their devices.
    Of course, this is assuming that it is for US flights only and other countries don't follow suit.

    There is some pretty compelling evidence that this might be a good idea.
    When in trouble, obfuscate.

  8. #23
    Forum Member Amy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    419
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've been following this issue closely (with dread), and hearing that it's likely that *all* inbound US flights are likely to be subject to the laptop ban in the coming weeks or months. I hope common sense prevails, but this is the U.S. Government we're talking about, so I'm not holding my breath. With 2 international trips coming up this year, I'm trying to figure out a worst-case-scenario workaround, since I flat-out refuse to risk checking my MacBook Pro through luggage, or to be forced to check bags, period.

    The maximum dimensions for *any* electronics in carry-on is 6.3" x 3.7" x .6" (16cm x 9.3cm x 1.5cm). That's basically the size and thickness of an iPhone 7 plus.

    Here's my workaround in progress. All electronics meet the size requirements:

    - iPhone 7 Plus
    - Samsung Galaxy Note 2 old phone as a backup
    - 15 ft flat HDMI cable
    - 12000 mAh portable power bank
    - ultra thin foldout keyboard
    - HDMI adapter for iPhone
    - Chromecast

    The plan:
    - All documents I'll need go in the cloud: Evernote, OneNote, OneDrive, Dropbox, Google Drive.
    - I leave my MacBook pro at home, powered on, so I can access it remotely via Chrome Remote Desktop (alternate: buy Jump Desktop?)
    - Use the HDMI cable to plug into my iPhone so that I can use a TV as a larger monitor whenever possible
    - Use the portable bluetooth keyboard to make typing faster
    - With Chromecast and the Samsung Galaxy Note, I can screen mirror. (Side note: I really wish there were a way to Airplay with screen mirroring from iPhone to Chromecast. Or, I wish Apple TV came in stick format.)

    This gives us a slow and painful way to work on some types of files via our phones without having to check any bags.

    Have any of you made plans that avoid checking a laptop that will allow you to work while overseas?
    Donít make something unless it is both necessary and useful; but if it is both necessary and useful, donít hesitate to make it beautiful. ó Shaker Philosophy

  9. #24
    Forum Member ceepee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
    Posts
    600
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    @Amy it looks like this might no longer be happening, for now at least Possible tablet and laptop ban on flights from Europe?
    https://9to5mac.com/2017/05/18/lapto...hts-abandoned/


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. #25
    Forum Member Amy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    419
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ceepee View Post
    @Amy it looks like this might no longer be happening, for now at least Possible tablet and laptop ban on flights from Europe?
    https://9to5mac.com/2017/05/18/lapto...hts-abandoned/
    It's not happening this week, but it's probably going to happen in the near future:
    https://www.ft.com/content/a5624c3c-...a-6027b8a20f23
    Donít make something unless it is both necessary and useful; but if it is both necessary and useful, donít hesitate to make it beautiful. ó Shaker Philosophy

  11. #26
    Volunteer Moderator
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    2,910
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It is perhaps innovation that may come out of this inconvenient situation.

    I am imagining a computer that is sized at the maximum dimensions allowed. Indeed, these phones are computers. But remove the LTE radio, and you should also be able to achieve a more attractive price point.

    Add an HDMI port to make it easy to connect to a larger display at your destination. Wait, not HDMI -- it seems that USB-C is the new standard.

    And carry with you a bluetooth keyboard + trackpad (not two separate devices, but with the functionality combined into a single device).

    Indeed, not as functional or convenient as a laptop -- but perhaps a better alternative to having to check in your laptop...
    -m

  12. #27
    Forum Member Amy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    419
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    @Maverick - It'll be interesting to see how the laptop-dependent of the world cope with this, and what clever gadgets may emerge. It took me a while to find a bluetooth keyboard and powerbank that met the restrictions-- most are too thick or too wide. I think the only way to get a comfortable big screen is to use an HDMI-capable TV at your destination. The phone screen is decent enough to use as a trackpad. Slow internet will probably be the real killer. And there are some apps that are simply unusable from a tiny phone (I tried, as an experiment, to do a bit of work in Illustrator today via my phone and Chrome Remote Desktop. What a laugh.)

    Perhaps the best workaround would be an airport computer rental that allows you to pick up and drop off at the airport. Bring a bootable drive, rent either a Mac or Windows machine, then drop it off upon your return. Like a car rental.
    Donít make something unless it is both necessary and useful; but if it is both necessary and useful, donít hesitate to make it beautiful. ó Shaker Philosophy

  13. #28
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    500
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think we're overthinking this. Now that ICAO is contemplating guidelines for in-cabin electronics and the very real threat that electronics may pose, the question isn't IF, but when and what - and it won't be only for the US and the UK.

    People will check laptops and most laptops will arrive at the other end unscathed. For those computers that get lost, you'll need a backup plan and virtually any modern phone will be able to connect to a monitor or TV for powerpoints and the like. Keep your files on a password protected flash drive and in the cloud.

    Create an account on a service like Dropbox for each client. That way, you'll be able to use of your client's computers by giving them the password and you won't have to worry about sharing sensitive information from other clients.

    Not having a computer with you in Europe or the US shouldn't slow you down much if you've prepared in advance. Remember that in most cases, your electronics will arrive when you do.
    When in trouble, obfuscate.

  14. #29
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    500
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You know, although I mentioned it above, I think it is important to reiterate that this isn't some goofball idea dreamt up by the US government, but it is a real threat that needs to be addressed.

    Some of may remember PanAm 103. In that attack, the explosives were hidden in a radio. That brought us guidance on electronics and for years we had to turn on laptop computers at the security checkpoints. Back then, I was traveling with an IBM P-70 - a briefcase sized computer without a battery - requiring lots of pre-planning because if the computer didn't turn on then it didn't fly.

    Back then, electronics filled the cases with no space for bad stuff. Today, you can power a laptop screen with the electronics of a cell phone leaving lots of room for cash, drugs or "bad stuff".

    We also know that the bad guys with bad stuff still focus on aviation, so stay tuned for more checks, more "guidance" and longer lines.

    The sooner the world wakes up to this real threat and does something about then the sooner we'll be able to play solitaire on our laptops in flight.
    When in trouble, obfuscate.

  15. #30
    Forum Member Amy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    419
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Another article on this subject, saying the electronics ban on flights will be very broad and also apply to flights leaving from the US as well:

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cnn...lly/index.html


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Donít make something unless it is both necessary and useful; but if it is both necessary and useful, donít hesitate to make it beautiful. ó Shaker Philosophy

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •