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  1. #1
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    Fissler Vitaquick (pressure cooker) recipes

    I just ordered a Fissler Vitaquick, the smallest size at 2.7 quarts. I've never had this brand before and am a novice when it comes to pressure cooking. I'm having a hard time finding recipes as most of what I'm finding online pertains to the InstaPot.

    Does anybody have a good source for lentil/legume recipes, in particular? I'm more used to the older model pressure cookers that vent by whistling out the steam. The Fissler does not release the steam on its own - requires either a manual release, cold water run over it to cool it down, or letting it sit for several minutes with the heat off to naturally vent.

  2. #2
    Forum Member Lodd's Avatar
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    From my own reading I think any pressure cooker recipes should work equally well for all pressure cookers. The only change is time taken based on pressure (psi).

    It seems your cooker (Fissler Vitaquick) has a low pressure of 5.8 psi and a high of 11.6 psi. Supposedly there's a button or knob to make that setting. Traditional pressure cookers operate at 15 psi. The good news is that the Instantpot ALSO operates at a high of 11.6psi. So you can directly copy all instantpot recipes. I use the instantpot myself and it works great. There are a bunch of great recipes online you can copy.

    The instantpot usually recommends a "natural" steam release where you wait around 15 minutes and the indicator pops down by itself. Your Fissler seems to operate the same way. When the recipes call for a quick release, maybe you can do the cold water thing then.

    TLDR; You can directly copy all instantpot recipes (including timing) because both pressure cookers have the same pressure of 11.6 psi.

    Hope this helps. Good luck.
    Last edited by Lodd; 03-12-2018 at 07:17 PM. Reason: Added emphasis
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  3. #3
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    When I was first learning to use my InstantPot, I found this vegetarian cookbook very helpful: The New Fast Food by Jill Nussinow. One other cookbook that has some nice vegetarian recipes, some of which are adapted to pressure cooker is Vegan Richa's Indian Kitchen by Richa Hingle, though some of the ingredients might require a bit more hunting initially for the spices. I also had a recent revelation when searching online recipes. It is possible on the Instant Pot to do a "zero" minutes setting for cooking; I steamed some lovely cauliflower that way. You just pressure release once it gets to pressure. Good luck!
    Last edited by NWhikergal; 03-12-2018 at 08:49 AM.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lodd View Post
    From my own reading I think any pressure cooker recipes should work equally well for all pressure cookers. The only change is time taken based on pressure (psi).
    Quote Originally Posted by NWhikergal View Post
    When I was first learning to use my InstantPot, I found this vegetarian cookbook very helpful: The New Fast Food by Jill Nussinow.
    Thank you both for your tips! I will research your recommendations - I've never really gotten good at cooking with a pressure cooker, so this will be an adventure.

    ETA - our library has a couple of other books by the same authors, NWhikergal, so I've requested those. Jill Nussinow has a book called Vegan Under Pressure and Richa Hingle has one called Vegan Richa's Everyday Kitchen with global recipes. While the recipes I prepare at home don't need to be vegan, I can definitely start with these references. Thanks again!
    Last edited by GoStanford; 03-13-2018 at 10:29 AM. Reason: More info

  5. #5
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    I love Vegan Richa's Indian Kitchen by Richa Hingle

    You can try before you buy if you go to Vegan Richa's website. I've had great success with her regular recipes. I don't have a pressure cooker, so my recipes take a few minutes longer to cook, but they come out great.

  6. #6
    Forum Member Lani's Avatar
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    I got a 6-quart Instant Pot around Thanksgiving and all I can say is that it has been a LIFE-CHANGING EXPERIENCE for our household.

    I know people describe it in glowing terms, but really, they aren't exaggerating.

    There are obvious advantages. Being able to make a delicious pot of fully cooked bean soup from dried beans to done in under an hour, from dry bag to ladle? Never messing up on perfectly boiled eggs, ever again? Yes, those are great.

    But for me, the biggest advantage is that I no longer have to physically STAY in the kitchen. Even if I'm cooking a pot of Japanese curry stew (which I do, often), I would periodically need to stir the pot. Not with the Instant Pot. If a recipe calls for sauteing anything, it will take a few extra minutes standing by the pot. Otherwise, once I put everything in the pot and turn it on, that's it! I can walk away and do other chores until it's done!

    @GoStanford -- I can't even begin to tell you how easy and foolproof most things are in an Instant Pot/pressure cooker recipe, assuming you are using a MODERN pressure cooker that's electric and programmable (not a manual one you have to put on your stove top).

    A couple of gotchas -- make sure the vent is set to be shut or else it will never build up pressure. Never add milk or cream to your recipe before you cook (or it could curdle; add it after). Also, even if you're just "cooking" something (like a rotisserie chicken) rather than boiling (like soups, chilis, and stews), you still need to add water. It's the pressure from the steam building up that cooks the food.

    "The Fissler does not release the steam on its own - requires either a manual release, cold water run over it to cool it down, or letting it sit for several minutes with the heat off to naturally vent."

    When you read Instant Pot recipes, cookbooks or blogs, they actually have acronyms and abbreviations or this stuff. "QR" (or "QPR") is quick (pressure) release; that's where you release the steam vent. "NR" (or "NPR") is natural (pressure) release, where you just let it vent slowly on its own once it's done cooking. I assume your model has a little vent valve and if you leave it alone, it slowly vents by itself.

    Some recipes call for immediate QR, while some will have you wait a couple of minutes before a QR. Others will have you do an NR.

    The boiled egg recipe I follows a really easy 5-5-5 rule: 5 minutes pressure (using the Egg setting), 5 minutes natural release (then quick release), then 5 minutes in an ice bath. I make them a dozen at a time and they make for easy breakfasts and egg salad sandwiches.

    I'm in love with my Instant Pot. I can't even imagine life without one now.

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