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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by backpack View Post
    They are part of the Aldi group, which is from Germany, I don't know if you have them in the U.K, they might be called Asda.


    PS: sorry for the previous post, which punctuation is not the best. I don't even have the excuse of using a phone.
    I believe Trader Joe's was purchased by Aldi only a few years ago, we don't have any actual TJs here in the U.K.

    I wish we did have TJs! I miss it.

    Asda is one of the big-3 supermarket chains here, and it is still owned by Walmart I believe, but there has been talk of them selling their majority stake to Sainsburys, a rival supermarket chain. Not sure if this has come to pass.

  2. #17
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    TJ's was bought by one of the Albrecht brothers in 1979...it's part of ALDI NORD... if you're bored sometime, google the Albrecht brothers

    TJ's is run independently and notorious for secrecy... my speculation is that the only thing they particularly share is the network of co-packers in Europe... companies that make and pack food for 'private label', ie, Kirkland Signature from Costco, Trader Jose from TJ's, etc. Lots of the special TJ products in the US are from European companies

    Asda is a British chain now owned by WalMart... they were going to have Sainsbury merge with Asda, leaving WM with less than 50% ownership, but the UK competition authorities don't seem to keen on it, and it's all still pending... and now there's rumors that KKR (private equity firm) is interested in Asda, if the Sainsbury deal falls through

    More than you wanted to know - there's always high drama in the food industry!
    I like all the blues and greys...and all the happy citrus colours too!

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by G42 View Post
    TJ's was bought by one of the Albrecht brothers in 1979...it's part of ALDI NORD... if you're bored sometime, google the Albrecht brothers

    TJ's is run independently and notorious for secrecy... my speculation is that the only thing they particularly share is the network of co-packers in Europe... companies that make and pack food for 'private label', ie, Kirkland Signature from Costco, Trader Jose from TJ's, etc. Lots of the special TJ products in the US are from European companies

    Asda is a British chain now owned by WalMart... they were going to have Sainsbury merge with Asda, leaving WM with less than 50% ownership, but the UK competition authorities don't seem to keen on it, and it's all still pending... and now there's rumors that KKR (private equity firm) is interested in Asda, if the Sainsbury deal falls through

    More than you wanted to know - there's always high drama in the food industry!
    Don't let any private equity firm get its hands on any of your grocery chains.

    Start co-ops!

  4. #19
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    Thanks, Rei, that's a great shop! I got a reusable cutlery set with a carrying case from https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/CreationsByJennieLee and have been very happy with that too. In the past I found that if I didn't have a case, inevitably pieces would go missing. Good luck with your sewing, and please post a pic if you'd like!
    So many bags. And I love them all.

  5. #20
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    I believe that Aldi, or at least some branches of it, do carry a very limited range of TJ products. Sadly there isn't one near me!
    So many bags. And I love them all.

  6. #21
    Forum Member bouncing's Avatar
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    Regarding plastic cutlery: Might I suggest a spork. I bring that little guy everywhere I go and whenever I'm eating at a place that sells food in disposable containers, I say no cutlery and use my own spork. I prefer that model because, with no moving parts or crevasses, it's easy to clean and always sanitary (unlike the ones that fold out like swiss army knives).

  7. #22
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    Yes! A little spork is a great addition. As you say, hygienic and practically weightless.
    So many bags. And I love them all.

  8. #23
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    Up,
    there are many things to say about this subject,

    Here some of my environment friendly tips
    It can be way better, but it's what I do, up to now, (I know you'll do better )

    Food
    - reduce the proportion of meat per meal (though per week, for me, it is about 2 to 4 meals without meat -lunch/dinner-, usually zero meat at breakfast)
    - shop at the butcher/fruit and vegetable shop => less to zero plastic bags
    - bento box, food bags* and furoshiki*... (*I sewed them recently)
    - bring my cutlery/mug/water bottle when needed
    - reusable shopping bags (but this one sounds way too obvious for Bihnions that I almost forgot)

    Clothes
    - keep (take care of) clothes for a (very) long time (I still wear a dress -as skirt- from my gradeschooler sel..best friend -who was and still is taller than me-, yes I'm tiny)
    - reduce the number of bought clothes per year (actually a little over a dozen of pieces -shoes and underwear include)
    - donate and sell (but I don't have that much so I procrastinate...) Or cut it and sew with the fabric (I like this one better )

    Transport
    - public transport for working days (I'm lucky there are a lot where I live)
    - optimize trips (travel for leisure + visit family in the same trip if it's close, yes my family is all around the world... like at the other side of the planet so...)
    - walk a lot I can I do

    Hygene
    I become more and more plastic packing paranoiac so...
    - start to use solid bars (shampoo, shower gel, cleanser, etc.) but not everything (I'm just starting)
    - re-usable wipes
    - menstrual cup and washable pads (deligh to use once you're used to it, total freedom)

    Water
    From my childhood days I'm kind of water freak so...
    - stop water tap anytime it's not in use (open and close often the water tap while cleaning the dishes or myself...) I even close the water tap when I'm not the one who uses it... (freak I tell you)
    - drink tap water (since it's safe in my country and good enough, actually I drink any water as long as it's safe and good enough, imagine my deligh in Iceland where wild water is good anywhere)
    - re-use plastic water bottles to fill with tap water


    I won't list what I'm not using/buying it will be weird, but let's say the most environment friendly thing is the one we just don't buy/use/consum.


    P.S. sorry for my Globlish
    Last edited by Rei; 05-15-2019 at 06:22 AM.
    just a Bihnion here

  9. #24
    Forum Member Duggy'sMom's Avatar
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    I find that the best things are the ones I actually carry with me. If they are wonderful but never make it into my bag then there's no point.

    I've started putting a collapsible silicon bento box into my little Swift for leftovers or other take away items. I also always have an original ACME workhorse shopping bag on hand as well.

    I've recently found this pocket cutlery set on Kickstarter which I'm hoping will also live in my bag. Pocket-Sized Reusable Cutlery & Chopsticks For On-The-Go by Outlery — Kickstarter


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duggy'sMom View Post
    [...]
    I've recently found this pocket cutlery set on Kickstarter which I'm hoping will also live in my bag. [...]
    pocket cutlery can be found anywhere (in plastic or in metal -sorry only French websites...- or even in wood) just take a look at camping cutlery or "bento" cutlery, and if needed buy un little box or pouch to store them (or even sew a pouch -it's what I did)
    just a Bihnion here

  11. #26
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    The majority of my clothing is from 24 to 10 years old. Some pieces are even older, bought when clothing was still made in the U.S.A.

    The key to make clothing last is cold water wash with ecofriendly detergent and air dry, or, fluff or delicate dry in a dryer.

    I also use lingerie bags and/or zippered protective pillow covers for delicate items.

    An ecofriendly hand dishwashing liquid is used to fight stains.


    After a trip that I had to cut short because of the inadequacy of disposables, I found this women owned small business reusable pads designer/maker, in the U.S. https://partypantspads.com/collections/pads

    I love their boxes which look like mini Tom Bihn boxes or craft paper packaging for smaller orders.

    It has changed the way I not only travel, go to gatherings but also everyday life from shopping trips to library and museum musing.
    The items fit perfectly in a 3D OC folded, a Side Kick flat.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by backpack View Post
    The majority of my clothing is from 24 to 10 years old. Some pieces are even older, bought when clothing was still made in the U.S.A.

    The key to make clothing last is cold water wash with ecofriendly detergent and air dry, or, fluff or delicate dry in a dryer.
    To build on @backpack's comment:

    In the US, there are finally some Energy Star rated dryers (yeah!).

    The traditional outdoor clothesline is great if you can swing it, but there are some communities that don't allow it, folks who don't have yards, allergen issues, etc.

    If you have space and the right climate, hanging things to dry over a drying rack inside is a huge energy savings and also helps prevent excess wear on your clothes too.

    The other thing to watch for, to prevent excess wear on your clothes and wasting resources is how much detergent you're using and how much you're packing into the machine.

    On a typical load, remove one 'normal' item at the end of the full cycle, whilst it's still wet, and put it into a clean sink or bucket of cold water and swish/agitate it for about half a minute. If you see a bunch of residue and/or bubbles come off into the water, you're probably using too much detergent and/or packing too much into the machine. The clothes should only be about 2/3 to 3/4 of the washer drum (depends on type & brand, there will be a reco in the manual). If the clothes can't move freely, they won't get as clean, won't rinse thoroughly, and will have a tendency to bind/damage each other.

    Oddly enough, I used to work for a detergent manufacturer... and I took the opportunity to ask ALL sorts of questions!
    I like all the blues and greys...and all the happy citrus colours too!

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by G42 View Post
    To build on @backpack's comment:

    In the US, there are finally some Energy Star rated dryers (yeah!).

    The traditional outdoor clothesline is great if you can swing it, but there are some communities that don't allow it, folks who don't have yards, allergen issues, etc.

    If you have space and the right climate, hanging things to dry over a drying rack inside is a huge energy savings and also helps prevent excess wear on your clothes too.

    The other thing to watch for, to prevent excess wear on your clothes and wasting resources is how much detergent you're using and how much you're packing into the machine.

    On a typical load, remove one 'normal' item at the end of the full cycle, whilst it's still wet, and put it into a clean sink or bucket of cold water and swish/agitate it for about half a minute. If you see a bunch of residue and/or bubbles come off into the water, you're probably using too much detergent and/or packing too much into the machine. The clothes should only be about 2/3 to 3/4 of the washer drum (depends on type & brand, there will be a reco in the manual). If the clothes can't move freely, they won't get as clean, won't rinse thoroughly, and will have a tendency to bind/damage each other.

    Oddly enough, I used to work for a detergent manufacturer... and I took the opportunity to ask ALL sorts of questions!
    Being an apartment dweller for many decades, mainly in European small one rooms during my college days, I have perfected the art of air drying using hangers secured to everything from door handles to shelves corners.

    When I moved to the U.S, it was 10 years of laundromat use. The U.S made shirts, I am still using were first washed in the big laundromat washers. So I learned to wash most of our things in one cold wash with diluted powder detergent. I learned the hard way not to use too much detergent, I had to re-wash some loads to remove the sticky residue too much detergent makes. Laundromat use means hunting for change, and having to do extra load is expensive.

    After becoming a Tom Bihn Inc customer, one of the major criteria for getting a place was a washer and dryer in the dwelling.

    I pretty upset that powder detergent cardboard boxes have been replaced by plastic boxes with powder detergent in plastic pods. I think, even ecofriendly detergent company no longer use the recyclable cardboard and powder detergent, they only have liquid in plastic bottles, which have no way of being refilled. I have not seen bigger bottles in Costco, a bulk grocery seller with membership.


    I used small and large yogurt cups with lids to transport the amount of detergent needed for each laundromat trip.

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