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  1. #46
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    Hummus has inspired me to make other beans' spreads.

    Thank you Darcy for the potassium soup, zucchini pastas and the nut pate recipe.

    Nut pate of some kind (like soaked nuts, lemon juice, sundried tomatoes or pomegranate molasses, smoked paprika, lemon juice)

    After a really big craving for traditional pate, I found a way to make, or most likely bought one with mushrooms, but, I think, one of the ingredient was palm oil, so I never bought it again.

    Trader Joe has brie cheese with mushrooms inside. It is really tasty, and an easy way to make baked brie.

    That store also has a jar of sesame seed paste that has a nutty flavor, without the nuts. It makes a great chocolate dessert with melted chocolate chips.

  2. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by backpack View Post
    Hummus has inspired me to make other beans' spreads.

    Thank you Darcy for the potassium soup, zucchini pastas and the nut pate recipe.

    Nut pate of some kind (like soaked nuts, lemon juice, sundried tomatoes or pomegranate molasses, smoked paprika, lemon juice)

    After a really big craving for traditional pate, I found a way to make, or most likely bought one with mushrooms, but, I think, one of the ingredient was palm oil, so I never bought it again.

    Trader Joe has brie cheese with mushrooms inside. It is really tasty, and an easy way to make baked brie.

    That store also has a jar of sesame seed paste that has a nutty flavor, without the nuts. It makes a great chocolate dessert with melted chocolate chips.
    That's great info - thank you, backpack!
    So many bags. And I love them all.

  3. #48
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    Thank you for that, Darcy! It's great to hear other people's ideas - so much I would never have thought of!
    So many bags. And I love them all.

  4. #49
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    Going vegetarian - tips?

    My favourite vegetarian food at the moment is pad Thai. Or any stir fry really.

    We eat vegetarian most nights. Being Indian origin though means my wife and I are used to eating lentils etc often anyway. While weíre not vegetarians we tend to eat meat once a week. Mostly salmon but that gets quite expensive so hence the once a week thing.

    Anyway I find stir fry is the easiest quickest food to make.

    Hot wok (or deepish pan) with nice curved edges and just throw veggies in it ( my go to is baby corn, cabbage, cauliflower, zucchini, bean sprouts, carrrot) and rice noodles. Season with simple herbs and spices. Fresh chillies, peanuts, garlic, ginger, soy sauce (or if youíre adventurous and donít mind the sweetish tastes then ketjap manis... thank me later) and lemon juice. Just start throwing things in one at a time and the biggest tip with stir frying is only do a bit at a time. Make two individual servings instead of making two servings at once. It comes out waaaaay better that way.... unless you have a huge wok.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #50
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    I want to second the recommendation given earlier of Deborah Madison's cookbook, Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone. It's amazingly comprehensive, but her primary point is that you shouldn't try to replicate meat dishes with a vegetarian substitute, or you will just feel that what you are eating is a second-rate version of the 'real' dish. So, no tofu to replace the ricotta cheese in lasagna, for example. Let tofu be tofu, and not a second-best replacement for meat or cheese. My daughter was vegetarian for about the last 10 years she lived with us, so we ate a mainly vegetarian diet where meat or fish was always separate from the main part of the meal when we had it. Today, she is an omnivore who doesn't actively avoid animal products but probably consumes no more than ten pounds of meat and dairy products a year. We, also, continue our omnivore ways now that she's left home, but probably eat non-animal-product meals for at least two thirds of our eating. We also raise most of our veggies, which encourages vegetable-based eating. I do still eat pasture raised eggs, though. Our farmer's market always has them, and they are a revelation.

    Get a good cookbook and avoid recipes that try to reproduce meated dishes without the meat. That's the key to going vegetarian without feeling that what you're eating is second best.
    Western Flyer (crimsom) with Absolute strap, Zephyr (black), Medium Cafe Bag (steel/olive), Shop Bags (solar, steel), Large Cafe bag (navy/cayenne), Small cafť bag (forest), Tristars (steel/solar and indigo/solar),Aeronaut (steel), Side Effects (old skool black cordura, olive parapack), Imagos (steel, cork, wasabi, and aubergine, hemp, steel), Dyneema Western Flyer (Nordic/Steel) and miscellaneous packing cubes, pouches, etc.

  6. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by flitcraft View Post
    I want to second the recommendation given earlier of Deborah Madison's cookbook, Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone.
    Ö
    Get a good cookbook and avoid recipes that try to reproduce meated dishes without the meat. That's the key to going vegetarian without feeling that what you're eating is second best.
    Just wanted to note that Deborah Madison revised this book, and that the current version is The New Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone, March 11, 2014. Iíve linked to the Kindle eBook version (which is currently $5.99 in the U.S. through various eBook vendors in addition to Amazon, but which seems really expensive in Canada, Australia, and Europe on a spot check). While I havenít seen the print copy of the current version, some review comments have stated that this edition uses a smaller, and harder to read type font than the earlier edition, so since I bought the eBook edition last year when it was on sale for an even lower price, and can state that the format displays well on an iPad or other tablet, Iíve chosen to give the eBook link.

    One general comment on Deborah Madisonís book: it is comprehensive in giving an extensive background, but the recipe section also makes extensive use of dairy products and eggs. This is not an issue if youíre an ovolacto vegetarian, but it is a limitation for vegans who are using this as a recipe source. (For people transitioning to vegetarian diets, this may be an advantage.)

    HTH

    moriond

    ETA: Since the original poster of this thread is in the UK, Iím adding the eBook link to the Kindle version in the Amazon UK store: The New Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone by Deborah Madison £4.49
    Pricing is actually pretty good in the UK store, with the eBook price on a par with the eBook price in the U.S. store. Since the hardcover price in the UK Amazon store is £24.08, the savings of the eBook version over the hardback book is even larger than for the U.S.
    Last edited by moriond; 06-06-2019 at 12:30 PM. Reason: Added link to UK eBook and price comment

  7. #52
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    The Deborah Madison Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone is one of the most cherished books in our pretty extensive cookbook collection. It was an integral part of igniting my ongoing passion for cooking altogether.

    Our copy is slightly beat up and I found a used copy of the updated edition so bought that thinking I'd relieve a little pressure on the original. As it turns out, I don't really use the updated version, so I can't even speak to the font size. It's hard to not reach for the miso-stained pages of a favorite cookbook when it's sitting on the shelf

  8. #53
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    Not vegetarian but we did commit to eating less meat and having more greens on the table. Have to say we did enjoy following the recipes from the Deborah Madison book, and it has changed my view of vegetarian meals.

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