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Thread: Tornado Go-Bag

  1. #1
    Forum Member NYCWriter's Avatar
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    Tornado Go-Bag

    Is it wrong that I geeked out over my Pilot while running for shelter during the Tornado Warning - Take Shelter warning today for New York City??

    Having grown up in Tornado Alley, I take these things seriously. Whatever EDC bag is in use (today it just happened to be my Pilot) already has my essentials packed for work, including checkbook, emergency cash, first aid, iPhone charger, and important papers (this year's tax stuff was already organized in a Bihn large organizer pouch, so I stuffed that in too). Scooped my most valuable watches and rings into one of the compartments ... put on my most comfortable jeans ... grabbed my wallet and phone (ugh and now my most comfortable MASK) ... AND a hat and hoodie.

    Took less than 30 seconds to do all this before I ran into the basement.

    I was the only one there.

    It boggles the mind how New Yorkers don't take these warnings seriously.

    Tornado Go-Bag-image0-2-jpeg
    Attached Images Attached Images Tornado Go-Bag-image0-2-jpg 

  2. #2
    Forum Member Chris D.'s Avatar
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    Good for you!
    Living in Tornado Alley will teach life saving skills for sure.
    Monster Truck (Nebulous Gray) Cadet (Steel /NW Sky) Yeoman Duffel (Burnt Orange)

  3. #3
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    Greetings,
    Glad you are okay! I'm always amazed at how much the Pilot holds. There is always room for one more thing.

    This reminds me that our earthquake go-bag probably needs a review.

    Thank you for sharing! elisa

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    A great time to review your go-bag and emergency kit(s) is when we change the clocks twice a year... we're past that now, but for the folks sheltering in place and such, now's a great time to catch up on all those tasks...
    I like all the blues and greys...and all the happy citrus colours too! My search unicorn is the Sapphire Dyneema original Small Shop Bag...

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    I think itís awesome that people have an emergency kit ready - I used to live in south FL where hurricane season is on from June till November - I need a few different kinds of kits - I have a kit in my pocket with eye drops, eye wipes, sea bands, band aids & a mirror - this kit goes everywhere with me. Itís just in case I donít feel well when I am out and about - I have it in a mini pocket - I try to keep a fidget in there too so I have an acupressure ring because it also helps with headaches


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Hi @Gigbrodt and @NYCWriter ,

    Just wanted to remind everyone that emergency Go Bags can be of all sorts: here's an old post by @eWalker (#156 dated 07-24-2014 from the middle of the old Daylight Backpack thread, and titled "DayLight Backpack is awesome as an Emergency Grab Bag!" where the Go Bag in question was not for hurricane, tornado, or earthquake preparedness, but to take his mother to the hospital on short notice.

    For aficionados of forum post history, I refer you back to @Zephyrnoid 's old Imagometrics web site. Note that the copyright date on the web site only goes to 2006, and that many of the Tom Bihn bags reviewed on the web site are retired by 2017 (the Brain Bag is still going strong). A lot of the information on that web page is old, and flashlights etc. have improved enormously, but the basic information is good.
    Quote Originally Posted by Gigbrodt View Post
    I think it’s awesome that people have an emergency kit ready - I used to live in south FL where hurricane season is on from June till November - I need a few different kinds of kits - I have a kit in my pocket with eye drops, eye wipes, sea bands, band aids & a mirror - this kit goes everywhere with me. It’s just in case I don’t feel well when I am out and about - I have it in a mini pocket - I try to keep a fidget in there too so I have an acupressure ring because it also helps with headaches


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    HTH

    moriond

    ETA: As a side comment, I was in NYC visiting my father during the Northeast blackout of 2003 and hurricane preparedness training (from Hawaii) kicked in. Ironically, we were just walking back after buying bottled water and batteries when the power went out. When power was still out after an hour, I filled the bath tub and some pots so we would have water to wash with and cook with (gas stove), and to flush the toilets in the case of a prolonged outage (in apartment buildings you lose water pressure sufficient to flush toilets). Oddly enough, @NYCWriter , I heard the tornado alert for NYC, because my weather alert apps are still set up to include NYC.
    Last edited by moriond; 04-23-2020 at 02:17 PM.

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    I spent a half hour in the basement around 1am this morning because of a tornado warning. The problem I have with the go-bag for that situation is a number of the things we want to have down there (kindle for the kids, flashlights, etc.) are also in use or have other "homes" the rest of the time. I probably need to start with a checklist of things to grab and throw in the bag (and remind the kids to charge things when the use up the batteries).

    Although this could be the excuse I need to finally get a pilot, once they're available again.

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    Not addressed to any previous poster, just my musings on e-kits and go-bags. Back in February I was helping younger co-workers with the idea of emergency kits...

    One way to think about it is to consider what emergencies you need to generally be prepared for and where/when they might happen, and build kits to meet those circumstances.

    So extra food, cleaning supplies, flashlights, medical, etc., can exist in your home for general Shelter in Place types of situations (just be sure to rotate your stock and try not to deplete it completely). Then you can put a subset in your basement/garage/outdoor shed/storage unit, whatever, for those times when you need to duck a tornado, the earthquake pancakes your house, whatever.
    Go hiking and/or camping? Keep your gear cleaned, ready to go, and available.
    Have a car? Put a go-bag backpack in it with a minimal kit, sufficient for a day or two.
    Mass transit to work? Leave a go-bag under you desk at work and carry a mini amount of stuff with you when you are in transit.
    Keep a duplicate go-bag near your house/apartment door in case you have to leave suddenly.
    Keeping the handful of extra stuff (wallet, keys, glasses, passport, etc) always in the same place when you're home makes it easier to grab it you have to bug out...

    I'm not talking about spending a fortune or trying to prepare for the zombie apocalypse... To be clear, I'm very aware that this is hard or impossible for a lot of people in the world and difficult for many in the US due to resources. If you're reading these forums on a computer and have bought and/or are contemplating a TB bag however, you should be able to do this. Most of us have some extra/old clothes, shoes, packs, whatever, and could assemble the basics of change of clothing, medical kit, lighting, copies of important docs/information, etc. fairly easily. Some of the more specific items (5yr water packets, etc) can be bought over time. A self made kit is usually cheaper and better overall quality than a pre-made one (though it takes more effort).

    I have a pretty thorough kit that will last me 1-3days in a backpack in my car. At work, my company stocks supplies (I live in earthquake/oil refinery area, but not the extreme CA forest fires), so I depend on that for the days I walk/bike to work. I have a similar go-bag in my apartment. My camping gear is all together in my closet. A large plastic tote of supplies is in my storage unit. My keys, wallet, glasses, passport are always in the same place when I go to bed at night, so I can grab & go.
    Last edited by G42; 04-23-2020 at 08:00 PM.
    I like all the blues and greys...and all the happy citrus colours too! My search unicorn is the Sapphire Dyneema original Small Shop Bag...

  9. #9
    Forum Member NYCWriter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moriond View Post
    ETA: As a side comment, I was in NYC visiting my father during the Northeast blackout of 2003 and hurricane preparedness training (from Hawaii) kicked in. Ironically, we were just walking back after buying bottled water and batteries when the power went out. When power was still out after an hour, I filled the bath tub and some pots so we would have water to wash with and cook with (gas stove), and to flush the toilets in the case of a prolonged outage (in apartment buildings you lose water pressure sufficient to flush toilets). Oddly enough, @NYCWriter , I heard the tornado alert for NYC, because my weather alert apps are still set up to include NYC.
    RE the water pressure.

    This is why I refuse to live in a building taller than five stories.

    The natural pressure of the water is enough to power toilets in buildings up to five stories tall. For six floors and taller, you need water towers/reservoirs, and electric pumps.

  10. #10
    Forum Member NYCWriter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by G42 View Post
    My keys, wallet, glasses, passport are always in the same place when I go to bed at night, so I can grab & go.
    After "misplacing" my keys one too many times (making myself late for work one day tearing the apartment apart looking for them -- they were in a pocket in a sweater that I'd folded and tucked back into a dresser), I stumbled upon a solution inside one of my all-time favorite places, The Container Store: a little steel mesh box (powder coated white) with a powerful magnet on the back.

    Now it lives forever on the inside of my (steel metal security) front door for ALL of my sets of keys: the minute I come in, they get dumped in the little box even before I lock all the locks.

    I also bought a larger magnetic steel mesh box for the front door that holds bills and other "essential" pieces of mail. I grab the mail from my mailbox down in the lobby, sort out the important stuff right there on the spot, and once inside the apartment, the keys get dumped in their box, and the bills go in THEIR box.

    This way they're always organized in their own place and don't get lost over the course of the month in the piles of crap that always seem to take over my desk.
    Last edited by NYCWriter; 04-24-2020 at 11:40 PM.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by G42 View Post
    Not addressed to any previous poster, just my musings on e-kits and go-bags. Back in February I was helping younger co-workers with the idea of emergency kits...

    One way to think about it is to consider what emergencies you need to generally be prepared for and where/when they might happen, and build kits to meet those circumstances.

    So extra food, cleaning supplies, flashlights, medical, etc., can exist in your home for general Shelter in Place types of situations (just be sure to rotate your stock and try not to deplete it completely). Then you can put a subset in your basement/garage/outdoor shed/storage unit, whatever, for those times when you need to duck a tornado, the earthquake pancakes your house, whatever.
    Go hiking and/or camping? Keep your gear cleaned, ready to go, and available.
    Have a car? Put a go-bag backpack in it with a minimal kit, sufficient for a day or two.
    Mass transit to work? Leave a go-bag under you desk at work and carry a mini amount of stuff with you when you are in transit.
    Keep a duplicate go-bag near your house/apartment door in case you have to leave suddenly.
    Keeping the handful of extra stuff (wallet, keys, glasses, passport, etc) always in the same place when you're home makes it easier to grab it you have to bug out...

    I'm not talking about spending a fortune or trying to prepare for the zombie apocalypse... To be clear, I'm very aware that this is hard or impossible for a lot of people in the world and difficult for many in the US due to resources. If you're reading these forums on a computer and have bought and/or are contemplating a TB bag however, you should be able to do this. Most of us have some extra/old clothes, shoes, packs, whatever, and could assemble the basics of change of clothing, medical kit, lighting, copies of important docs/information, etc. fairly easily. Some of the more specific items (5yr water packets, etc) can be bought over time. A self made kit is usually cheaper and better overall quality than a pre-made one (though it takes more effort).

    I have a pretty thorough kit that will last me 1-3days in a backpack in my car. At work, my company stocks supplies (I live in earthquake/oil refinery area, but not the extreme CA forest fires), so I depend on that for the days I walk/bike to work. I have a similar go-bag in my apartment. My camping gear is all together in my closet. A large plastic tote of supplies is in my storage unit. My keys, wallet, glasses, passport are always in the same place when I go to bed at night, so I can grab & go.
    Do most of you keep your passports at home? I keep ours in the safe deposit box at the bank as I donít have a fireproof safe at home. But now Iím wondering if I should have them at home. Thoughts?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sstj315 View Post
    Do most of you keep your passports at home? I keep ours in the safe deposit box at the bank as I don’t have a fireproof safe at home. But now I’m wondering if I should have them at home. Thoughts?
    I've always kept mine at home... I seem to relocate states every 3-5 years and houses/apartments every 2 or so, and just never got in the habit of having a safety deposit box. Never had my house or apartment broken into and I don't have roommates...
    It would probably be safer to have it in a SD box, but I don't stress about it. I do have photocopies of important docs locked up at work, since theoretically that helps start the process of replacement if your original is lost/destroyed.
    Fireproof safes are good for smaller fires, but I live in CA and the raging infernos out here routinely toast the fire safes... I'm in a more urban location, so that's not as big a concern, but I just leave it my OP on the shelf next to my bed, with my flashlight and glasses.
    I like all the blues and greys...and all the happy citrus colours too! My search unicorn is the Sapphire Dyneema original Small Shop Bag...

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by G42 View Post
    I've always kept mine at home... I seem to relocate states every 3-5 years and houses/apartments every 2 or so, and just never got in the habit of having a safety deposit box. Never had my house or apartment broken into and I don't have roommates...
    It would probably be safer to have it in a SD box, but I don't stress about it. I do have photocopies of important docs locked up at work, since theoretically that helps start the process of replacement if your original is lost/destroyed.
    Fireproof safes are good for smaller fires, but I live in CA and the raging infernos out here routinely toast the fire safes... I'm in a more urban location, so that's not as big a concern, but I just leave it my OP on the shelf next to my bed, with my flashlight and glasses.
    Thanks, G42. I live in a pretty rural, upstate NY region and fortunately we don’t have fires, floods, or other natural disasters to really worry about. I’ve just always had a SD box for important documents but with banks closed, I have wondered if these things should be more readily accessible. I adopted my daughters internationally and the documents I am most concerned about are their certificates of citizenship. They are almost irreplaceable. Definitely something to think about.

  14. #14
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    My wife and I are finally getting serious about putting together a set of supplies to sustain us for a short length of time (to be decided) in the event of an earthquake. The singular thing about earthquake risk is that there is no warning, unlike tornados, hurricanes, wildfires, riots. The only thing in place so far is a some water storage containers designed and sold for that purpose. Of course the water has to be changed out periodically. We also have the water heater strapped to the wall so it won't fall over in a quake, and of course that's a water supply too. We're not going to buy one of those "emergency packages". We're going to assemble our own.

    Sometimes gas lines are ruptured in quakes. We have a little Coleman stove just in case.

    Another thing that'll be part of the kit will be a portable solar charger for smartphones, iPads etc.

    But what I really haven't thought through is what some call a "bug out" kit. That's what goes out the door with you if you have to flee for any reason. It might include some form of personal defense, by the way.

    What happens when you're not prepared? Here's a particularly bad and true story:

    Good friends of ours, living at the time in a Chicago suburb, had a major fire in their house and had to get out instantly with nothing but the clothes on their backs, sit on the ground across the street, and watch their house burn to the ground, even though the fire dept. showed up quickly. They literally had nothing left. No ID, no credit/debit card, no medical insurance cards, no birth certificates, no checkbooks, no drivers' licenses, no passports, no money, no keys, nothing. And both cars, in the garage, burned up as well. Their grown children, living independently, bought some clothes for them and paid motel bills until they could resurrect their identities. Initially they could not even access their bank accounts. Their recommendation: photocopy all your important documents and cards, and keep that digital file somewhere that will go with you when you flee, and possibly a copy in another location. This could be on a thumb drive, in a file on your smart phone (if you are sure you'll have that with you) or both. Remember also, if you cannot identify yourself and/or don't have keys, forget about accessing a safe deposit box.

    If they had had a prepared bugout bag, including digital copies of documents, the aftermath would have been vastly easier.

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