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  1. #16
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    Greetings,
    Besides Starbucks, are there any other cards that can be topped up like this, that also have franchises world wide? I'm not a coffee drinker. I usually have a yogurt cup for a snack when traveling, if that helps.

    Loose change from other countries usually becomes a stocking stuffer for my nieces and nephews. They love it. Small amounts of change work well for this. For larger amounts of change, however, it would be better to top up a card. elisa

  2. #17
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    You're smart in not converting your money back and forth into different currencies. The more you do that, the more money you lose.

    I'm always wary of new products that seem to be "free." I always wonder how they make money . And I'm assuming it's by not giving the best exchange rate.

    As for me, I try to use up coins before I leave a country and just hold on to bills until my next visit. I wear a moneybelt so the bills go into a small ziploc bag to keep them from getting moist. I will also try to use plastic if just on a layover.

    One tip....don't keep bills too long. I just found about 80 British pounds printed in early 1990 and have been told I can't spend them before first exchanging them for new bills. That means the next time I'm in London I have to go down to the Bank of England to make the exchange.
    Editor--One Bag, One World: News, Reviews & Community for Light Travelers. http://www.1bag1world.com

    Aeronaut(2), Tri-Star(2) Cadet , Large Cafe Bag, Travel Tray, Travel Money Belt, Absolute Straps(3), Side Effect, Clear Quarter Packing Cubes (2), 3D Organizer Cubes (4), Aeronaut & Tri-Star Packing Cubes, Clear Organizer Wallet, numerous Organizer Pouches,, Guardian Dual Function Light, Vertical Netbook Cache, Nexus 7 Cache, RFID Passport Pouch, numerous Key Straps.

  3. #18
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    As a fellow non-coffee drinker I'd like to point out that Starbucks still has a lot of options for us... There are usually several iterations of hot chocolate, cider, and chai, along with a decent selection of regular tea, both hot and iced, and then there are the fruity/smoothie type options. They also have pretty good breakfast sandwiches, oatmeal, and yogurt, in addition to all of their bakery items. For lunches, they have those rice salad bowls, regular salad, and sandwiches/wraps.

    I don't swing by Starbucks regularly, but I wouldn't pass up a gift card to the store or discount them as an option for this sort of money exchange just because I don't like coffee. Smilie

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bchaplin View Post
    @travelman, this is very interesting. I have two credit cards that have no foreign transaction fees, but they are chip and signature, not chip and pin, so this would be an improvement, and something useful to add to my travel wallet.

    Have you used this successfully, and if so, in which countries?
    I have not used it myself as of yet. I just found it last week. I am home recovering from a kidney stone removal so I am not traveling at the moment. It seems a lot of ppl on Flyer Talk are using it and it is working quite well. Some have used it in Spain, and Scotland with no problems. Let me know how you like it if you decide to get it.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank II View Post
    That means the next time I'm in London I have to go down to the Bank of England to make the exchange.
    Bank of England?

    You need to go to the Dawes, Tomes, Mousely, Grubbs Fidelity Fiduciary Bank!! Wink

    That is interesting -- yes, I suppose we can expect different treatment for older notes in different countries.

    Also, older notes may also have a collectible value. We have some Canadian $2 notes that my son was happy to add to his collection. Indian 1, 2, and 5 Rupee notes are something you won't come across anymore -- they switched to coins for Rs. 5 and under some years back. There is a Rs. 10 coin as well, but Rs. 10 notes are still commonly used.
    -m

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoStanford View Post

    And are there any services I can use to turn in old marks, francs, etc now?
    Those are collectibles, check auction sites or the sale/trade area of numismatic (coin collectors) forums.

    I could bet, that the services, would pay you the minimal face value of the currency, minus their fee, and most probably, unload their finds, in the collector market.

    Why not cut the middleman and raise your profits. If you don't want to be bothered with collectors, you can place the old currency in a box and donate it to a local non-profit silent auction, you then, deduct the donated price from your taxes.

    You could call the donation beginner European currency/coin collector set.

    This way you are happy, the non-profit is happy, the buyer, who is a collector, or has a hard to please family member, or friend is happy to have found a unique holiday gift and the recipient is happy.

    Local museums are also non profit, if a local historical figure was born in Europe when the currencies were used, might want them. The donation is also tax deductible.

    If both the non-profit or museum need, one day, to raise cash for an important project, they can choose to display, silent auction some of the currencies and sell the remaining or duplicate currency/coins.

    That little bundle of leftover historic currencies, can do, a lot of good!
    Last edited by backpack; 11-04-2015 at 01:06 PM.

  7. #22
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    This is sort of related. I have a lot of coins (a small box full) from the last time I visited England (1987). Is it worth bringing them along on my upcoming trip? Or just leave them at home as souvenirs?

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by maverick View Post
    Hi folks,

    I wanted to find out how you manage cash when you travel abroad.

    When I travel to India, I generally connect through a European city. It's great that Euros are accepted in the EU! However, I also carry other currencies with me (GBP, CHF), even though I may not have plans to stop in Great Britain or Switzerland. I have had travel plans change enough that it doesn't hurt to leave other currencies in my travel wallet. In addition to that, I have Indian rupees in there. I don't convert what's left over when I leave a country - I keep it for the next time I'm there. It's convenient not to have to find an ATM when you arrive. The result, however, is a bulky travel wallet.

    When I arrive in a country, I shift some cash for that country into my clear organizer wallet. And I shift the cash from the previous country into my travel wallet. This works, but it's a bit cumbersome.

    And then there are coins, which I try to use up. But I'm not good at bringing coins from prior travel with me. At this point, there is a very full mini organizer pouch at home with coins from several countries.

    I'm curious how you manage cash and coins when you travel.

    Thanks!
    I used Mini OPs in different colors for coins and matching Small OP for bills housed in the Clear Quarter Packing Cube, with a lot of paperwork folded in 4th.
    This is a bit bulky and was set up before the creation of the Double OPs which, I believe would be preferable for all kind of travel related paperwork.

    While we are on the subject of travel and chip cards, I would be very happy if Tom created an RDFI double OP Organizer wallet.
    Both or one compartment would feature the pockets like the ones in the Freudian Slips and Ultrasuede separators to hold multiple smart cards arranged by countries or use (gift cards, food cards, transportation cards and money cards).

    So take the Double OP line it with RDFI fabric anchor a Freudian Slip like pocket in the back of the first compartment and in the front of the back compartment, where Ultrasuede dividers are affixed.

    The light fabric of the FS pockets is invaluable in dark or dimly lit places, color coded dividers help find the right card or feel it without getting scratched, the area between the pocket and the RDFI fabric can be used to house a multi countries card like the ones which provide snacks in airports in exchange for overflowing change.

  9. #24
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    Depends on the coin

    Quote Originally Posted by ladyinblack1964 View Post
    This is sort of related. I have a lot of coins (a small box full) from the last time I visited England (1987). Is it worth bringing them along on my upcoming trip? Or just leave them at home as souvenirs?
    UK no longer uses pennys or tuppences. Other coins have changed size and shape. It depends which coins they are as to whether they are still in use. Perhaps check online to match yours.

    If you have a lot - in value - of old currency, you may be able to exchange it but I'm not sure.

    You'd have to consider the weight of it all flying vs the value.

    My grandmother used her old 'coppers' for poker money with friends. So we have done the same with our travel currency with the kids. It is fun to use all the coins mixed together that way, but it can also be confusing to assign values. We usually do it by size or colour for simplicity.

  10. #25
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    A funny postscript to the thread -
    I just landed in Amsterdam Schiphol and am here for a few hours. Waiting in line at the Starbucks, I pulled up my Starbucks app on the phone, and asked if I would be able to use it here. Turns out, no, this airport's store is a franchise and they don't accept the cards/apps. But the funny part was that the people in front of and behind me were disappointed, too -- everyone would rather pay by phone these days.
    ----
    All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.
    Edmund Burke

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirri View Post
    UK no longer uses pennys or tuppences. Other coins have changed size and shape. It depends which coins they are as to whether they are still in use. Perhaps check online to match yours.

    If you have a lot - in value - of old currency, you may be able to exchange it but I'm not sure.
    I think all coins from 1987 and onwards should still be OK for use in the UK. Off the top of my head, I can't think of any coin which was accepted in the past but now no more. If for whatever reason a shop won't accept something, any bank should do so but even if that fails, then the Bank of England can convert any currency (however old and even if damaged, e.g mashed up in a washing machine) for you!

    Damaged and Mutilated Banknotes | Bank of England

    If you have spare change left over after a holiday, your airline might take part in the "Change of Good" programme for donations to be collected for UNICEF:

    https://business.un.org/en/documents/64

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