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  1. #1
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    Emergency bags: let's share

    What's in your emergency bag? Or, even more importantly, which bag do you put your emergency stuff in?

    Mine has changed several times over the last five years, but this is what I've got right now.

    I've started using my Luminary 15 as an emergency bag and I really love it for this use. The first reason is that it is so slim, it won't get too in the way. The second reason is that it's easy to carry with my normal EDC, a PU, so I don't have a case of dueling backpacks.

    I got the idea for this particular setup after a couple of late night trips to the after-hours medical centre with my kids. The bag's main purpose is to get the three of us through 24 hours of staying somewhere else, unexpectedly.

    Here it is so unassuming:



    Here is what I keep in the external pockets (not a lot, just colored pencils and coloring books):


    At the bottom is a PCSB (in "I like to keep my emergency stuff in red" Iberian) containing one full outfit for each of us, which could be used as PJs or during the day.



    On top of the PCSB is a Clear Quarter Packing Cube with toiletry items on one side and a charging cable, ear buds, emergency blankets and other random stuff on the other side.



    Then at the very top is a non-TB three-zip Pouch with diversions, mostly stuff from party bags like fidget spinners and tiny pencils and paper, also tiny playing cards and also dominos made out of cards.


    The things in my bag are mostly items that are kind of redundant but I don't want to get rid of completely. Like a jersey dress I don't like that much but it is fine. Or the octopus-like multi-charging cable which charges things really slowly. Or Apple ear buds.

    I would love to see what's in everyone else's emergency bags, whether it's a 72-hour go bag or something for more minor emergencies.

  2. #2
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    That’s an excellent idea! My children are all grown, but my husband has been hospitalized a couple times and I was able to throw thing for him into a bag quickly (but forgot about things for me). Having a go-bag would sure cut down on the stress level. I’ll get started on this right away!

  3. #3
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    You're more thorough in your emergency bag. It's a great idea. This past month, I've spent at least 2 different nights in the emergency room with my father. Since he has multiple chronic life-threatening illnesses, I never know when I'll have to spend several hours at the hospital. I've just added an extra pouch inside my S19 that has some snacks and a few dollars. I also make sure I have a water bottle with me. The best thing is the padded organizer pouch clipped to an O-ring containing my kindle. Never leave home without it. Here's hoping none of us have to use these emergency kits

  4. #4
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    I grew up in semi-rural snow country where we'd often lose power for several days, so I was brought up to 'be prepared'.

    Now I live in earthquake country. I have a packed emergency 'shelter in place' type backpack in my car that I would hope is accessible from my apartment, job, and work, most of the time. It's a bright yellow 'Life Gear' brand loaded pack that I added more stuff to. At the time I bought it, it was one of the best pre-loaded gear bags...it's very sturdy and reasonably comfortable, not like many of the very cheap nylon AAA, Red Cross, etc packs. Those may or may not contain decent gear (depends on who made them and what year they were made) but they are often poor quality packs in case you actually have to carry/walk out of an area.

    Redundancy is useful for disasters where a location becomes inaccessible, so I have a stash of additional supplies in a utility closet in the garage and then my normal camping gear and groceries, etc. are in my apartment. I also have a secondary random backpack with a change of clothes and a reduced amount of 'shelter in place' gear if I have to run out the door. Many of these things are just spares/extras that I've accumulated over time (I move a lot) or serve a secondary purpose (like camping, normal canned goods, etc.).

    I don't live with anyone or have small people to watch out for, so I don't have a 'run to the emergency room' bag in support...
    On my last visit home though, I did actually quickly go to the emergency room to be with a relative who had gone in by ambulance... I simply tossed a couple things from my A30 into my PCSB and was ready to go in 2min.

    I usually know where my stuff is, what would be needed, etc., so I don't need more than a couple minutes to pack unless it's something very unusual/new. I pack for most trips about a half hour before I walk out the door... I know what cloths travel well and the toiletries and random stuff stay packed.
    I like all the blues and greys...and all the happy citrus colours too! My search unicorn is the Sapphire Dyneema original Small Shop Bag...

  5. #5
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    I've never had an emergency bag at all, I don't live in an area with natural disasters pretty much (I guess we could get a flood, but I think there would be enough warning to pack!) -- but the snow is not super bad, and the local government is very efficient, there are never hurricanes, tornadoes, or earthquakes, so...

    We do have a pre-packed first aid kit that we can just throw in for when we travel though. It doesn't have much -- antiseptic ointment, band aids, a larger bandage, some alcohol wipes, a tick removal tool (so..many..ticks..here -- super dangerous!), anti-itch/bite cream, nail clippers, tweezers, headache pills, allergy pills. It's really for the treatment of minor wounds, the kind you get when you travel with kids, and for my persistent hormone-related headaches. I'd like to add some aloe vera gel for burns, sunscreen, and bug repellant. Yeah, the main danger in Sweden is probably the insects. I got bit by a horse-fly last summer (of which there are like 10 species) and my leg swelled up to the size of a softball and stayed swollen for a week. I though I might have to go to the hospital!

    Interested to see what you more prepared people (facing larger-than-insect dangers) pack though.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ejvc View Post
    I'd like to add some aloe vera gel for burns, sunscreen, and bug repellant.
    The last time I got a burn, I read the packet of burn gel from my first aid kit and I was surprised to see that the active ingredient was tea tree oil! I have a small bottle of tea tree oil in my house so I used that instead of the gel from the kit. It worked instantly and completely took the pain away.

  7. #7
    Forum Member sturbridge's Avatar
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    I've never had to evacuate my house, but I do keep extra stuff on hand for power outages and the like (food that just needs water, flashlights, camping shower). I have a "keep comfortable overnight" bag in my car in case I have a breakdown in a winter storm (though since I no longer commute, it'd be unlikely I'd be out in bad weather). I have a blanket, a mylar bivy, pillow, and a small esbit stove and tablets to make some tea.

    I do have a pouch put together as an emergency room pouch- it has those items that keep me socially acceptable if I had to stay somewhere overnight without proper facilities (like a shower). It has toothpaste/brush, wipes, moisturizer, a small hand towel, etc. I also have a small pouch of laminated cards that have yoga poses, tai chi stances and breathing exercises ie stress relief if I were in such an emergency situation. Luckily I've never had to use any of these, and I hope I never will. Just having them gives me peace of mind that I could react quickly to an emergency if I had to.
    Proud owner of: Pop Tote in cloud, Aeronaut 30 in steel/iberian, Travel Cubelet in Dawn, Travel Cubelet in Nebulous Grey , SE in steel parapack, SSB in black halcyon, Pilot in steel dyneema/steel, , Truck in Nebulous Gray, Small Zipped shop bag in black, Small Zipped shop bag in Dawn numerous pouches, 3D cubes, Q kits and straps, Cubelets and Ghost Whales!

  8. #8
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    You know what, tea tree oil is a really good idea -- I'm going to add to my list because instead of taking disposable wipes I'm going to take a couple of cloth squares in a waterproof bag with water mixed with tea tree oil. We did these instead of disposable baby wipes when the kids were small, it was great and much more environmentally friendly!

  9. #9
    Forum Member Rei's Avatar
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    inspiring thread, thanks for sharing

    (I don't have emergency bag -yet-)
    just a Bihnion here

  10. #10
    Forum Member threeteez's Avatar
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    Interesting posts!

    In winter, I keep a bag of extra clothes, water, snacks in the car when traveling in snowy weather along with a snow shovel. We get summer storms and occasional power outages so there's always a basket of battery lanterns and flashlights handy in a cabinet.

    My ready at all times emergency bag is an original Nordic A45 PCBP with important document/papers and jewelry for a grab and go scenario.

  11. #11
    Forum Member KmK's Avatar
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    As someone who has been in a hurricane, a tornado, a flood, and a significant earthquake...

    Into my Natural Disaster bag goes at least: Passport; cash; flashlight; 2-3 pr. underwear; full water bottle; flattened roll of toilet paper; small bag of toiletries; comb; print-out of contacts from phone with key numbers highlighted; one top appropriate to the season; charger for phone; notebook, pens; large lightweight rollable/squishable scarf. My wallet will be on my person.

    I've also done my share of immediate ER runs for others. With me come folded up sheets from word puzzle books--good for the waiting and they I've had them work well aloud as a place for the ill person to focus and calm down; full water bottle; sandwich; book, notebook, writing instruments, phone charger.

  12. #12
    Forum Member bchaplin's Avatar
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    I've read numerous threads about this. I always vow to make up a bag but never do. The problem is that there are so many TYPES of disasters, and I get overwhelmed planning. The best I can do is to keep all my travel gear in one drawer (and my latest strategy is that it's all in Viridian-colored bags of one sort or another), so that I can pack up quickly. Putting my birth certificate and other vital documents, and maybe a hard drive, in that drawer might be a good idea. But I'm not really prepared for natural disasters beyond having the ability to make a hasty exit.

    The truth is that having a family emergency that requires jumping on a plane is probably the most likely possibility.
    ----
    All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.
    Edmund Burke

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bchaplin View Post
    I've read numerous threads about this. I always vow to make up a bag but never do. The problem is that there are so many TYPES of disasters, and I get overwhelmed planning. The best I can do is to keep all my travel gear in one drawer (and my latest strategy is that it's all in Viridian-colored bags of one sort or another), so that I can pack up quickly. Putting my birth certificate and other vital documents, and maybe a hard drive, in that drawer might be a good idea. But I'm not really prepared for natural disasters beyond having the ability to make a hasty exit.

    The truth is that having a family emergency that requires jumping on a plane is probably the most likely possibility.
    Yeah I also got really overwhelmed reading about emergency bags and I never made one until I realized exactly what sort of emergency I was personally likely to experience. I think your travel drawer sounds very practical. Maybe a USB thumb drive with scans of all your important docs could be permanently clipped somewhere if you do have to jump on a plane.

    We don't generally have extreme weather where I live but the house next door can always catch on fire so I figured a fireproof safe and an overnight bag would do the job 99% of the time. But I might now take my own advice about the USB drive Emergency bags: let's share I am sure I have one going unused.

  14. #14
    Forum Member melminimalist's Avatar
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    I live in an area known for tropical storms and hurricanes, but we get like a week advance notice before they hit. I do always pack an evac backpack once a storm is announced, mostly because I have a tiny doggie and we would need to leave sooner rather than later since dogs are not always welcome in shelters. Most of the backpack has stuff for the doggie since he is my baby.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    "Not all who wander are lost"
    "Love people, use things, because the opposite never works" - The Minimalists
    Synapse 25 in Olive, Aubergine Side Effect, UV A30 PCBP, Sitka PCSB

  15. #15
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    Kleenex/TP/wipeees. Space-consuming, but necessary.
    Happy owner of Original copilot, Nordic Original small cafe bag, Nordic Halcyon Synapse 25, Nordic Halcyon medium cafe bag, black Halcyon Sidekick. Gave son The Maker's Bag and he LOVES it. Gave Hubby a Pilot for Christmas!

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