Main TOM BIHN website
 
emailus@tombihn.com

COMMUNITY FORUMS

Welcome! We're glad you are here. This is the place to ask for bag advice, help other people out, post reviews, and share photos and videos.

x

First, select your desired search engine:

  • Google Search
  • DuckDuckGo
  • Original Forum Search Engine

User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 16 to 21 of 21
  1. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Posts
    2
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for suggestion..

  2. #17
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    27
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Lani View Post
    Another vote for layers. And this actually allows you pack fewer things; I realize that sounds counterintuitive, but the idea is that you can mix and match based on your weather needs.
    Fashion-wise this is actually a great tip. You don't have to wear something different everyday to keep your outfit interesting, you just have to find different ways to style them!

    But really I do layers so I could bring fewer apparel.

  3. #18
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    11
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I hope I can help you by providing this https://www.travelsafe-abroad.com/united-kingdom/. It may help you too which places are safe to visit and what you need to bring and be prepared for this trip.

  4. #19
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Share
    New Zealand
    Posts
    257
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think it's a very good idea to look for information on a country you're planning to visit, to check safety and be prepared. However the Travel Safe - Abroad website mentioned above is not one I would recommend for this purpose. I've looked at the UK page and find the advice given differs from other reliable sources and is lacking in some respects.

    One example is it doesn't warn about using unlicensed taxis. Another one is "Another thing to watch out for is crossing the roads, since every year tourists suffer from traffic accidents because the British people drive on the left side of the road which is highly confusing for people from around the world". It's not confusing for people from Australia, Thailand, India, Japan and various other countries which also drive on the left side of the road.

    What I think is the best place to check is your own country's safe travel advice. Here's what the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand have to say about the United Kingdom. The reason I suggest this is that each country will tailor their advice to the knowledge and expectations of their citizens.

    For the UK, both Canada and the US mention the left-hand driving, but Australia and New Zealand don't bother, because their citizens are used to it. The US travel advice for the UK mentions not bringing in mace, pepper spray, knives or any part of a gun, while the Canadian and Australian travel advice mention severe weather conditions. This will be based on the experience of their consular officials who help people in difficulty.

    As well as checking your own country's travel advice on the country you're travelling to, it's also a good idea to register your travel plans. That means you'll be contacted in the event of a natural disaster, civil unrest etc, which could impact your safety and travel plans.
    A30 in original halcyon/wasabi. Side Kick in verde/northwest sky and cloud/viridian, Pop Tote in Mars Red, Travel Cubelet in Mars Red, A30 packing cube backpack in northwest sky, large travel tray in sitka, packing cubes, pouches and cubelets

  5. #20
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Share
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    299
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Driver handedness is good advice for everyone to pay attention to, Europe has both.

    In the same vein, avoiding driving altogether is good advice, particularly with so many transit options available. It's hard to see the sights if you're busy dodging cyclists or potholes. There are limited supplies of automatic cars (may be different now), and renting a stick is risky...learned that one the hard way.

    State dept has good info for starters, and covers a lot of the bureaucratic hurdles or visas some countries will require. Their heatmap is useful for visualizing advisories in regions where you might be travelling. They don't always have info on specific "new" risks like the grabby thieves on scooters that are proliferating. I was surprised they didn't have a section for female travelers.

    Remember; you don't have to outrun the bear, just the other guy. Use keyrings to fasten your zippers, and clip the sternum strap to make it that much harder to get your stuff. And it's good advice to blend in with the locals as much as you can. The guy ambling around in baggy pants and NFL gear with his face buried in a Fodor's guidebook is going to be the first one to have his wallet picked.

  6. #21
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    42
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I’ve recently come back from two weeks in Central Europe, visiting Prague, Bratislava and Vienna with day trips to Dresden and Budapest. I really liked Prague and Budapest but would recommend most of the places I visited; Dresden and Bratislava are really day trips.

    Thinking of tips that helped me out this time:

    Carry more cash than you would in the USA or possibly the UK. A lot of public transport, pubs, and cafes prefer cash. Cards are still mostly accepted in major cities (no American Express or Discover; JCB and the Chinese brand I can’t remember were also super-rare) - but often you’ll run into situations where you’ll need coins. In particular, the transit systems of Prague, Bratislava and Budapest had fare boxes that only took coins, unless you were at metro and large rail stations. Get cash at ATMs; money changers can take a chunk out of your funds - especially at the airport, at major train stations, and in the touristy areas.

    Public transit is generally mind-blowing, especially if you’re from the USA where it is either non-existent or working but massively aging and in need of repair. Often I didn’t have to wait more than five minutes for the next tram/metro/bus, even at 6am or 10pm. Most cities require tickets purchased in advance and you validate on board; pay attention to this as fare inspectors are likely to be plain-clothes officers and they will fine you on the spot if you’re without a validated ticket.

    Speaking of transit, you’ll want sturdy shoes. You don’t need hiking boots unless you’re hiking, but the kilometers will rack up fairly easy. Pace yourself if you’re not ready for it.

    Intercity rail is pretty darn good and inexpensive. You don’t need a rail pass; just buy tickets at the station or on an app. I would avoid flying if your destination can be reached within four or five hours by rail, as it will take as long or longer to get to an airport, fly, and then back into the destination city.

    Check supermarkets for inexpensive and filling fare, especially in places like Switzerland where you need a loan for a small country if you’re used to three square meals a day. Also stay hydrated; just because the beer can be cheaper than bottled water doesn’t mean beer replaces water!

    Double check before flying out that you’re carrying AC/mains plug adapters. In most cases you’re not going to need a voltage conversion; review the back/bottom of every AC/mains powered device you are carrying to ensure this. (Plugging in a 120V device into 240V turns it into a fuse!) I would definitely carry a device to charge all of your USB-related items from one brick instead of requiring multiple plug adapters.
    Last edited by allanorn; 07-21-2019 at 07:44 PM. Reason: Formatting

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •