Main TOM BIHN website
 
emailus@tombihn.com

COMMUNITY FORUMS

Welcome! We're glad you are here. This is the place to ask for bag advice, help other people out, post reviews, and share photos and videos.

x

First, select your desired search engine:

  • Google Search
  • DuckDuckGo
  • Original Forum Search Engine

User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 17
  1. #1
    Forum Member kathryn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Share
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    610
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Ireland in October

    I'm headed to Ireland. It was a spur of the moment ticket purchase (well, mileage redemption) as my BFF decided she needed to go to Ireland this year.

    Happy to take any suggestions or advice folks have, but what I really, really want to know is this: if I drive a manual transmission daily in the US, will I be okay in a manual rental car in Ireland? I've only driven on the "wrong" side in an automatic before (Japan), but the price difference in rentals makes the M/T so tempting.
    "I'm more of a creative problem solver with good taste and a soft spot for logistical nightmares.Ē ― Maria Semple, Where'd You Go, Bernadette

  2. #2
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    368
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I drove all over Ireland in an automatic. If you are used to driving a manual transmission, I don't see anything from my driving experience that would make that harder in Ireland. Depending on where you are driving most of the roads are pretty small. Some of the larger towns, you do need to "pay attention" to where you are going ��

  3. #3
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Share
    UK
    Posts
    223
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you usually drive a manual, then rent a manual, it just makes sense, why make things harder with an unfamiliar gearing system?

    Manual is much cheaper to rent anyway and there will be much larger choice of vehicles.

    Sent from my SM-T713 using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Share
    Alaska
    Posts
    634
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Greetings,
    If you are seated at the wheel on the left side of the car, shifting is done with the right hand. While the foot pedals are in the same configuration, being seated at the wheel on the right side of the vehicle means that you will be shifting with your left hand. All the gears are in the same H pattern, so it should be easy to adapt. I suggest pushing in the clutch and repeating the pattern a few times with your left hand for a few moments before starting the car. Since you already drive a standard, it will probably come to you quickly. By the end of your trip, it will feel natural.

    I noticed where most of my coworkers expressed confusion was at the traffic circles. Look right, say it out loud, repeat it often, make it a chant and you will get it quicker. Really. I taught my friend how to drive on the correct side of the road in Scotland and after a few days it was natural.

    I use the chant, "look right, stay left" at intersections to remind me that traffic approaches from the right first, and the reminder to stay left kept me from using autopilot and turning into the incorrect lane.

    After three weeks of driving in Scotland and England, it was amusing when I got back home. I automatically walked over to the passenger side and got in. The steering wheel was missing! I did it a few times and it was funnier each time. elisa

  5. #5
    Volunteer Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    1,296
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaGirl View Post
    Greetings,
    If you are seated at the wheel on the left side of the car, shifting is done with the right hand. While the foot pedals are in the same configuration, being seated at the wheel on the right side of the vehicle means that you will be shifting with your left hand. All the gears are in the same H pattern, so it should be easy to adapt. I suggest pushing in the clutch and repeating the pattern a few times with your left hand for a few moments before starting the car. Since you already drive a standard, it will probably come to you quickly. By the end of your trip, it will feel natural.

    I noticed where most of my coworkers expressed confusion was at the traffic circles. Look right, say it out loud, repeat it often, make it a chant and you will get it quicker. Really. I taught my friend how to drive on the correct side of the road in Scotland and after a few days it was natural.

    I use the chant, "look right, stay left" at intersections to remind me that traffic approaches from the right first, and the reminder to stay left kept me from using autopilot and turning into the incorrect lane.

    After three weeks of driving in Scotland and England, it was amusing when I got back home. I automatically walked over to the passenger side and got in. The steering wheel was missing! I did it a few times and it was funnier each time. elisa
    Great tips!

    If your rental place gives you a Renault, ask for another car. The way you go into reverse is by pulling up a ring on the gear shift. Possibly not on all models but certainly a possibility. Itís really hard to do that with your left hand, especially if youíre right handed and you donít have a giant hand. The few times I drove a Renault Clio I had to use two hands to put it in reverse Ireland in October

    The other thing to be aware of is your position in the car. As an American, my body is on the left and it is in the left half of the lane. Sitting on the right as a driver in the UK was the most stubbornly subconscious part of it to try and rewrite. While driving here I kept drifting over the left hand line at the side of the lane because my brain wanted to be in the left hand side of the lane, even if I wasnít in the left hand side of the car! Pay attention to where the lane lines are when youíre driving in the right hand side as your brain will want them to be somewhere else.

    Good luck!

  6. #6
    Forum Member kathryn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Share
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    610
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Cristina View Post
    If your rental place gives you a Renault, ask for another car. The way you go into reverse is by pulling up a ring on the gear shift.
    It's always puzzled me that we have to have so many different ways to get to reverse. My last Subaru was like the Renault--lift a little ring, not sure where on the H-patters R was though? I think my first Subaru was backwards, beneath fifth gear, definitely no ring to lift. And they were both Legacies! Just a couple decades apart My Honda was beneath fifth, too, I believe, and my current VW is yet again different: you push the shifter in and then R is kind of to the left of first. And I am pretty sure my Volvo was in the same place, but you didn't need to push the shifter in. (Realizing that I've had a lot of cars LOL and am probably stressing over nothing since I've been driving exclusively manuals for 15+ years)

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaGirl View Post
    I use the chant, "look right, stay left" at intersections to remind me that traffic approaches from the right first, and the reminder to stay left kept me from using autopilot and turning into the incorrect lane.
    I like this idea, especially for roundabouts. I'm glad I will have a co-pilot/navigator to deal with the map and yell at me if I forget what lane I should be in.

    Thank you both the tips!
    "I'm more of a creative problem solver with good taste and a soft spot for logistical nightmares.Ē ― Maria Semple, Where'd You Go, Bernadette

  7. #7
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Share
    UK
    Posts
    223
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If we're going to recommend car brands, or not, may I suggest you also avoid Vauxhall/Opel because the handbrake is always terrible for some reason. Just not strong enough for hill starts.
    Car hire company have tried to give me Vauxhall Corsa twice recently and both of them were lemons with weak handbrake, busted mirror adjustment and random lights coming on and off on the dashboard. I have also had bad experience with the Meriva. Avoid.
    I drive a VW at home and have had success with Nissan cars on hire recently.

    Sent from my SM-T713 using Tapatalk

  8. #8
    Volunteer Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    1,296
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    @kathryn based on this discussion so far, Iím tempted to suggest that you ask for the same make of car as you currently drive at home. If even one thing can be familiar it will give you that much brain space for all the other stuff thatís different.

  9. #9
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Share
    Springfield, MA
    Posts
    246
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I drive stick at home, and had no problem changing sides in Ireland. The challenge was the tiny narrow roads, and giant trucks that speed mercilessly in the oncoming lanes! I highly recommend renting the smallest car that makes sense for you and your luggage.

  10. #10
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Share
    Alaska
    Posts
    634
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Greetings,
    Both my friend and I would chant together, "look right, stay left" at every intersection for the first few weeks. It was especially helpful having a navigator. She was an extra pair of eyes that could spot the next turn or destination while I was focused on driving safely.

    If you can get a copy of the rules of the road it may be helpful. The street signs may be different and we found it very helpful to study them in advance. elisa

  11. #11
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Share
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    306
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would caution against renting a stick. You can be sure that the clutches in rental cars are abused to the max, and whoever is lucky enough to be holding the bag when it burns out gets stuck with the bill. Unlike other wear components like brakes, the agency will assume YOU were solely responsible (Fortunately when this happened to me, my credit card paid the deductible, and my company insurance picked up the rest...still a $2,600 PITA).

    A worn clutch was the last thing I expected on a car with 11k miles...then again, what else should one expect of a rental 6-spd 5.0 Mustang GT in America. Probably every mile driven was driven maniacally.

    At the very least, make sure you rent it with a credit card that will pay for such damages.
    Last edited by imperator; 07-25-2019 at 12:36 PM.

  12. #12
    Volunteer Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    1,296
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by imperator View Post
    I would caution against renting a stick. You can be sure that the clutches in rental cars are abused to the max, and whoever is lucky enough to be holding the bag when it burns out gets stuck with the bill. Unlike other wear components like brakes, the agency will assume YOU were solely responsible (Fortunately when this happened to me, my credit card paid the deductible, and my company insurance picked up the rest...still a $2,600 PITA).

    A worn clutch was the last thing I expected on a car with 11k miles...then again, what else should one expect of a rental 6-spd 5.0 Mustang GT in America. Probably every mile driven was driven maniacally.

    At the very least, make sure you rent it with a credit card that will pay for such damages.
    Ouch, what an expensive charge!

    I have to say that cars in the UK and Ireland are a lot more reliably road-worthy than in the US. In the UK at least cars have to pass an MOT which is a health checkup. Not only emissions but the general state of the car.

    In the US you are allowed to drive cars that have a non-working door, for instance, or bald tires or a dodgy clutch (state laws will vary).

    You canít do this in the UK legally and they take this sort of thing seriously. Ireland is likely similar. The advice about the credit card still applies though.

  13. #13
    Forum Member kathryn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Share
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    610
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm double checking with both AmEx and Chase on my coverage for rental cars to see which one has better terms.

    I've only rented cars a couple times overseas, but my experience has been what Christina described--they seem better maintained than ones in the US. One US rental I had to swap out twice for different cars because of mechanical issues (including sketchy brakes which was terrifying).
    "I'm more of a creative problem solver with good taste and a soft spot for logistical nightmares.Ē ― Maria Semple, Where'd You Go, Bernadette

  14. #14
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Share
    Springfield, MA
    Posts
    246
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah, I did get a flat tire in Ireland (did I mention the narrow roads???) and had to pay for it. My thought is that people who rent manual cars in Ireland know how to drive stick. All the rental cars are manual, and you pay almost double for an auyomatic. Whereas idiots with no training rent manual Mustangs in the U.S. and try to fake it. So I'd expect Irish clutches to be in better shape.

  15. #15
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Share
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    306
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Cristina View Post
    Ouch, what an expensive charge!
    In the US you are allowed to drive cars that have a non-working door, for instance, or bald tires or a dodgy clutch (state laws will vary).

    You can’t do this in the UK legally and they take this sort of thing seriously. Ireland is likely similar. The advice about the credit card still applies though.
    A private citizen may drive any heap of junk they like in some states, but none of the above will be the case for rental cars, they are generally very well maintained. I don't know that rental companies anywhere inspect the clutch plates at any interval, and nowhere do they replace them as a precautionary measure. Most of the horror stories I found while researching for recourse were from people who rented cars in Europe, as there are hardly any stickshift rentals in America to begin with. Since the inspection intervals are based on an expectation of "normal" driving, stickshifts rented to tourists, many of whom haven't touched one since their driving class, are more likely to wear prematurely.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •