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  1. #16
    Volunteer Moderator aedifica's Avatar
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    I was going to suggest https://lighterpack.com/ as well, but I see @DWSeattle beat me to it! I found it much easier to cut down on what I was carrying when I could see how much it weighed in relation to other items. It takes some extra time the first time you use it, but it saves the items you entered for previous trips so you don't have to look up their weights the next time. After I had entered all the weights I found myself naturally making choices like "item X is heavier than anything else, but I really need to bring it with me, so I'll take out items Y and Z to make up for it."

  2. #17
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    Greetings,
    I found the One Bag website helpful. https://www.onebag.com/

    Adding a laundry kit to my bag really cut down on the clothing needed. With a tiny pack of 50 laundry soap leaves, I can go for any length of trip with no more than 3 outfits (wear one, pack two). Each top matches all the bottoms, so I have 9 total outfits.

    Wool has many benefits. Wool shirts in lightweight, summer-weight, or base-layer weight keep me cooler in hot weather than any other shirt I've tried. Wool doesn't hold odors, so it can be worn multiple times before it needs to be washed. My long sleeve wool shirt, size large, weighed less than my short sleeve cotton t-shirt.

    The One Bag website is full of great ideas. Not all of them work for me on every trip, but by making a few changes I can travel one bag style when I need to. Good luck! elisa

  3. #18
    Forum Member Rei's Avatar
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    There have been three web articles which inspired me to onebag/minimalist travel (currently I use GES25) but there are either in French or female oriented (kind of) or both Wink

    under 5kg : Voyager avec un Sac à Dos Ultra Léger (moins de 5 kilos au total) (French)

    with S19 only (I discovered TB since!) : Voyager très léger : l'ultra minimalisme (French&Female oriented)

    with 16L + purse : https://herpackinglist.com/how-to-pa...-packing-list/ (Female oriented)

    there are quite extreme, but they inspire a lot
    just a Bihnion here

  4. #19
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    23 lbs is a hair over 10kg. I have often carried that much in my A30 with only a sternum strap and no frame sheet without too much trouble -- I bet you have to adjust the straps...

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by thorn View Post
    I'm packing ... the A45 and it's filled to the brim, same as the other bag was last time. I weighed it and the bathroom scale is showing 23.5 pounds. It is heavy to wear with the backpack, sternum, and waist straps, frame installed. It's pulling on my neck muscles.

    In one end pocket, I have water sandals and Coleman FreeFlow 40 oz mug. In the other end pocket, I have my utilities bag, sunglasses, and a pelican case 0915. In the adjoining zipper slot is a small TB organizer pouch.

    1 backpack packing cube with clothes and a regular packing cube with clothes although all the clothes were shoved into one of them last time. Also in main compartment is small packing cube with travel games, and the thin clipboard case for papers.
    Much as I hate to respond to a question with more questions, but I think there's a bigger context here with the packing list. If the OP can reply with why they are looking to go one-bag we can help more. Are you flying to get to cruises? Are you looking to do a non-cruise trip that may require more travel with stricter baggage limits? Or is it because it'll save time at the docks because you can bypass the madness of dropping off and picking up bags? Are you carrying anything else so the A45 has to be on your back?

    The "why" behind going to one-bag is really important. It might be because of specific trip requirements (e.g. Barefoot Windjammer where space really is limited), or it's to avoid hundreds of dollars in checked baggage fees each time you go on a trip. Most reasons are good and noble, but the more we know about you and why you want to do it, the better targeted advice we can give - even if it's another option like 2-bag.

    If the OP can be more specific around what's packed in that bag, we can determine if there's something completely out of line. I'm concerned about the travel games and/or the Pelican case - do you have children? Are the travel games physical or is it something like a Nintendo Switch (hence the Pelican case)? What's in the utilities bag and what's in your toiletry bag?

    My current thought is that if the OP is just heading on cruises, one-bag with an A45 may not be the best solution. The A45 can be worn as a backpack but I wouldn't consider it comfortable, especially over long distances where you're hiking through an airport to a bus and from the bus across the docks and up five floors on a cruise ship. You may need more specific strap adjustments so the weight of the A45 is mostly on your hips, which means you may need to pack the bag differently so the heavier items are in the bottom of the bag. Failing that there might be some biomechanical issues that someone a chiropractor might need to sort out - neck problems are annoying and an actual backpack might be a better ergonomic fit than an A45 in backpack mode.

    If the OP has everything they'll need in an A45, I would consider splitting it between two bags like an A30 with an L15: roughly the same amount of space, but now your back is handling approximately 1/3 of the load. This also gives you a day pack for excursions off the boat, plus you can generally use this setup anywhere in the world when flying unless you're purchasing Basic Economy tickets or have some hyper-aggressive carrier that weighs carry-on bags (I'm looking at you, Lufthansa and Air France).

    How could I thin it down to eventually work an A30?
    This one's easier to answer: Cut what you're currently carrying by at least one-third in volume. Better packing techniques can make more efficient use of space but that's not going to solve everything. You will want to keep track of what you packed and then review what you used and did not use, and then refining your packing list from there. More expensive solutions are lighter-weight clothing, swapping the 40oz water bottle for something sleeker (Coleman offers a 24oz version of the bottle), replacing items in your utilities and toiletry bags. But the simple and cheaper solution is to carry less if you can - some trips, you just can't do that.
    Last edited by allanorn; 08-10-2019 at 11:30 AM. Reason: Clarifying the "why" question.

  6. #21
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    I've done two three week trips with a Shadow Guide (31L) and a sling bag -- one to Columbia, the other to Europe -- and had room in the pack for souvenirs.

    Reducing the weight and amount of clothing you carry is essential, and you'll probably need an entirely new wardrobe. Also, accept the fact that you'll probably need to wash socks and underwear in a sink.

    Here's the clothing I carried. I put the socks and underwear in a small laundry travel sack, and the rain jacket in a small travel sack. The rest of the clothes (other than the sandals) fit in two packing cube shoulder bags.

    SOCKS AND UNDERWEAR

    I carried four pair of underwear and five of socks, in addition to what i was wearing. If you buy high tech or merino underwear (Ex Officio or Smart Wool, for instance), you *can* comfortably wear them more than once. I wore each pair three times before washing, which meant washing underwear once on a three-week trip.

    For socks, I wore 1/4 height ultralight merino-blend running or biking socks I bought on clearance at REI. They're half the weight and volume of most crew length socks. I sometimes wore sandals without socks, so I was able to wear each pair of socks twice and wash them once.

    OTHER ITEMS

    On the plane, I wore a pair of long travel pants, a merino long sleeve Henley, and SOM Trailhead shoes along with socks and underwear. The following were ROLLED and packed:

    1 lightweight packable rain jacket (Eddie Bauer)
    1 or 2 long travel pants (Prana Stretch Zion)
    1 or 2 lightweight board shorts (Prana or Patagonia)
    1 merino button-down dress shirt (Wool & Prince)
    1 merino long sleeve henley (Wool & Prince)
    2 merino t-shirts (Woolly)
    1 *very* light synthetic t-shirt (adidas; used for sleeping)
    1 pair minimalist sandals (Z-trail by Xero)

    The board shorts are great, as they're light, compact, have a pocket, and can be used both as street wear and for swimming. (One pair spent time in the Blue Lagoon near Rekjavic).

    I'd obviously swap things out depending on the weather where I was going -- for instance, trading the Henley for another t-shirt in warmer temps, or vice versa. And if you're going to be in a range of temperatures, taking things you can layer is critical.

    I was comfortable with this in temps ranging from the upper 40s to the mid 80s. For colder temperatures, I'd take a light, packable down vest or jacket, something like the Patagonia Nano Puff.

    None of this was cheap, but for me it was worth it. I'll use the stuff for years, and I much prefer to travel as light as I can.

    One last point, which some may consider heresy: If you're serious about one-bag travel, and expect to walk any distance with your bag, the A30 is not the best option, and it's worth considering bags from other companies. Among TB bags, the Synik 30 would be much better; and the Shadow Guide or Guide's Pack work very well if you're willing to live with the slight inconvenience of a top loading pack. (If you put most everything in packing cubes, it isn't really a big deal.)
    Last edited by Buffalonian; 10-01-2019 at 09:24 AM.

  7. #22
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    I actually found the A45 to be easier to carry than the A30. The A30 tipped me backwards, while the A45 sat the same weight closer to my back.

  8. #23
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    I am a committed two-bagger (I like my EDC to be separate) but I have worked very very hard to get my travel bag down as small as it can be. I have taken the now-discontinued Night Flight Travel Duffel as a weekend bag for three people and I’m getting ready to do the same again for longer.

    The things that have made the biggest difference is the fabrics of my clothing. I have been switching over to smaller-packing and faster-drying clothes for a couple of years now and it has made an enormous difference to how much my packing cubes weigh and how many tops, etc, I can fit in. I’ve chosen linen and wool over cotton, packable down and rain jackets, and I’ve spent hours and hours actively refining my approach.

    Sometimes though, I need a certain outfit for a party or a wedding and then I’m right up to my biggest bag. Paring everything down isn’t always the right choice.

  9. #24
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    When I pack the A30 I always pack clothes in the main compartment, and usually in one A30 packing cube, although I would take two for colder weather. I wear one bottom and pack two (pants or skirt/shorts,); pack generally two long-sleeved shirts and two shortsleeved shirts (wear one of these); pack two sleeveless shirts (one a long tunic that doubles as a nightgown); wear a nice cardigan sweater; wear a nice jacket; sometimes replace a shirt with a dress; sometimes pack a down vest, down skirt, and long undies as well. Wear one pair of shoes and sometimes pack a second lighter pair (nice looking tennis shoes can go a lot of places). Pack a big scarf and a little scarf. Pack three or four pair undies and socks, sometimes tights, and a swimsuit. Sometimes the undies, socks, scarves, and swimsuit go in a half-cube.

    End pockets contain on one side shoes (if I pack them), cables, and small craft or creative project; on the other side, laundry supplies in a small quarter cube and snacks/water bottle/packable tote. Toiletries and first aid in the lid pocket. Laptop in the backpack straps pocket. Day bag in the main compartment if I take one. I often have space in the main compartment for souvenirs and gifts from the trip which I acquire on the way.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by allanorn View Post
    Much as I hate to respond to a question with more questions, but I think there's a bigger context here with the packing list. If the OP can reply with why they are looking to go one-bag we can help more.
    When I go on vacation, I don't want to be bogged down. I don't want to have to check luggage if flying (rare) nor do I want to hassle with multiple bags because I already plan on using backpack packing cube as an extra carry on the way back from wherever. Plus, the less you take, the less there is to bring back, and the less decision making is required during the trip. We do mostly cruise locally for vacation but we enjoy not having to drag luggage down the stairs for debarkation. I don't trust anyone with my luggage except myself as I have watched online videos of mishandled luggage, from airlines to cruise ships, etc. If it stays with me, then it should make it to my destinations with me.

  11. #26
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    I'm a dedicated one-bagger but I two-bag on cruises. The extra space is great in the larger bag for the necessary outfit changes on a cruise and you really must have a separate embarkation/debarkation bag with your swimsuit and a change of clothes.

    I one bag all other times. As others have alluded to it's about cutting out everything that's non-essential. You don't have to be miserable on a trip to do this, but it might mean you don't have a large variety of outfits to wear.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buffalonian View Post
    .
    ...1 pair minimalist sandals (Z-trail by Xero)...
    I got a pair about three months ago, and love them. They are perfect lounging/shower/pool shoes that work for all day trips where sandals are appropriate, with not-quite-a-barefoot feel (just a little padding). I pack them instead of my Teva sandals, and they are about 1/5th as thick.

  13. #28
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    Hey, thorn (OP), how is it going at this point? Please post an update when you get a chance.

    One piece of advice I picked up years ago: Pack your onebag outfit and take a drive to a nearby tourist attraction or destination town and book two nights in an inexpensive motel. Try out the system you’ve created under real world conditions. Do not unpack, use your bag. Do laundry in the shower or sink. Take long walks to test your outerwear and shoe decisions. Go home, lay out all your stuff, and quickly and mercilessly eliminate everything you didn’t use. Replace what broke. Fill any gaps that exist in your inventory but you must remove two items for every one item you acquire. You do not need to buy expensive or fancy gear or clothing or bags. You just make it work.

    Reducing one’s travel items requires a commitment to possibly being uncomfortable or inconvenienced. Our collective experience around here clearly indicates onebagging (or, in my case, two-bagging)is not only possible, it’s rewarding. ONe can easily transition from hauling two checked bags AND a carryon AND a personal item to a single, legal carryon and a small personal item. Packing lists are available all over the interwebs. Hundreds of “pack with me” videos on the YouTubes. Dozens of useful and practical onebag websites. In my case, depending on the trip, I select between a Patagonia MLC45 and TB Aero30 and I always bring the Patagucci Refugio backpack = two bags.

  14. #29
    Forum Member ClicketySnap's Avatar
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    I saw a lady use a really cool packing method on a YouTube video, and I suggest it all the time.

    Leave your chosen bag out of sight. Instead, get out two laundry baskets/Rubbermaid tubs/boxes/etc. Make a pile between those two tubs of all the things you think need to be packed for that trip.

    Then sort everything into the two bins. On one side, put the bare minimum things you NEED to get by. Not enough socks/underwear for the whole trip, for example, but the absolute smallest amount that gives them time to dry in between wear and wash days. No luxury items. Just what you absolutely must have to survive.
    On the other side, luxury items, the rest of the clothes you WANT to have with you on your trip, and any duplicates or extras.

    Now get out your travel bag and pack only the NEEDS.
    Then slowly go through your WANTS bin. How many pairs of socks are you willing to give up to bring a third pair of shoes? How much are you willing to “give up” to bring luxury items?

    It’s not a foolproof method and still causes a lot of anxiety. But analyzing each item individually against the space and weight it takes up in your bag might help you pare things down a little.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClicketySnap View Post
    I saw a lady use a really cool packing method on a YouTube video, and I suggest it all the time.

    Leave your chosen bag out of sight. Instead, get out two laundry baskets/Rubbermaid tubs/boxes/etc. Make a pile between those two tubs of all the things you think need to be packed for that trip.

    Then sort everything into the two bins. On one side, put the bare minimum things you NEED to get by. Not enough socks/underwear for the whole trip, for example, but the absolute smallest amount that gives them time to dry in between wear and wash days. No luxury items. Just what you absolutely must have to survive.
    On the other side, luxury items, the rest of the clothes you WANT to have with you on your trip, and any duplicates or extras.

    Now get out your travel bag and pack only the NEEDS.
    Then slowly go through your WANTS bin. How many pairs of socks are you willing to give up to bring a third pair of shoes? How much are you willing to “give up” to bring luxury items?

    It’s not a foolproof method and still causes a lot of anxiety. But analyzing each item individually against the space and weight it takes up in your bag might help you pare things down a little.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    That's a great packing idea! I feel like that's a wonderful way to learn to prioritize things properly, and could be useful in other aspects of life.

    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk

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