Main TOM BIHN website
 
emailus@tombihn.com

COMMUNITY FORUMS

Welcome! We're glad you are here. This is the place to ask for bag advice, help other people out, post reviews, and share photos and videos.

x

First, select your desired search engine:

  • Google Search
  • DuckDuckGo
  • Original Forum Search Engine

User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 16 to 22 of 22
  1. #16
    Forum Member haraya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,368
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Love all the tips so far!

    For the bags that you will be leaving with friends: Perhaps, after ensuring they are dry and odor-free to begin with - you can enclose some of those "Damp-Rid" packets from the hardware store? (Though, I wouldn't carry those on lest they be mistaken for hazardous material. But perhaps they sell them at your destination.)

    Alternately, you could look for the odor eliminator packs made from volcanic rock (ZeoLite is one brand). These tend to leave little bits of dust/rock everywhere, so I'd set them on something before placing in your bag (and making sure the bags aren't jostled while you're away).

  2. #17
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Share
    Brisbane, QLD, Australia
    Posts
    2
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can use perfume to keep the odor at bay. I have used baking soda and got great results in keeping the odor away from my clothes while they were in the suitcase.
    Last edited by danielsmith35; 05-13-2015 at 06:13 AM.

  3. #18
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Share
    Alaska
    Posts
    620
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Oh, here's another all natural tip my grandmother taught me. Sachets!

    Buy or make little fabric sachet bags. Fill them with your preferred scented stuffing, then sew them shut. Add a ribbon for decoration if you like. Place completed sachet in suitcases, drawers, closets, and all clothes storage containers.

    Stuffing option #1: Pine needles. Use real pine needles from a real pine tree. Or buy pine sachets and mini pillows from L.L.Bean.

    Stuffing option #2: Lavender. I prefer to use real lavender. There is a lavender farm in Maine, but other sources exist. Food grade lavender is sometimes available at the local natural food store.

    Stuffing option #3: Cedar shavings. A mesh bag is acceptable here, but a fabric bag works.

    Stuffing option #4: Potpourri. This one is tricky. If possible, find a potpourri that is all natural. Most of the stuff available in big box stores is loaded with man made chemicals - avoid them!

    Renew the scent of your handmade sachets with real pine essential oil, real lavender oil, or real cedar oil. It only takes a drop. Allow the sachet to dry completely before placing it back in use. The benefit of pine, cedar and lavender is they all repell pests naturally and your clothes smell lovely.

    Kids can make these for themselves and as gifts. My siblings and I always enjoyed making them at my grandmother's house every summer. It was fun and we had something nice to bring home. It was always rewarding to give them as gifts or use them ourselves when we got back home. elisa

  4. #19
    Forum Member Lani's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Share
    Northern California
    Posts
    1,168
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaGirl View Post
    Buy or make little fabric sachet bags.
    For those wondering where to buy such little fabric bags, the easiest is to go to Michael's or JoAnn's. You can get them in see-through fabric with a cinch tie on top so you don't even need to sew them shut. Some examples here: Bags

    The small ones should be more than enough size-wise.

  5. #20
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    8
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hey everyone, here's a little update after having lived out of our Aeronauts for about five weeks now:

    I started with a few small pieces of cedar wood (like these) and put a couple of drops of high-quality lavender essential oil on each one. I then let them air out for a few hours (like I mentioned, I'm super sensitive to smell and didn't want the smell to be too overwhelming on my clothes). We then did a little experiment: both my boyfriend and I use several packing cubes and the Travel Laundry Stuff Sack in our Aeronauts. I put one piece of cedar wood in each of my packing cubes and the Laundry Stuff Sack, whereas my boyfriend didn't use any. After about a week, my clothes still smelled fine, but my boyfriends t-shirts already started to get that stale smell. I think the odor is not just due to dampness or dirty clothes, but also due to the material of the backpack/suitcase itself.

    So far, I'm reasonably happy with the solution, but I also want to try these Moso bamboo charcoal bags. Especially, for our "homebase" suitcases that don't get opened/aired out as much as the Aeronauts. Unfortunately, we're moving around so much right now it's a little tricky to have anything shipped. (Well, not to complain, I love the traveling! )
    Last edited by este; 07-05-2015 at 08:34 AM.

  6. #21
    Forum Member bchaplin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1,949
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For what it's worth, my suitcase and bags were a little stinky after returning home from Nigeria last week. Being in a subtropical climate, 24+ hours in transit, and then stowed in my basement while I found time to deal with them will do that. I washed all the clothes, and laid the empty suitcase and various organizer bags in the hot sun. (I actually placed the entire lot on the hood of my car.) It seemed to do the trick. I also reassured myself that the UV in the sunlight has some antimicrobial qualities. Please don't tell me if this isn't true.
    ----
    All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.
    Edmund Burke

  7. #22
    Volunteer Moderator tpnl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Share
    Toronto, Canada (GMT+5)
    Posts
    1,385
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Great point @bchaplin! My wife was just reading about how hanging things out in the sunlight to dry acts as a natural way to kill bacteria and microbes. I predict that I will be using my CC "toolkit" to setup a clothes line some time in the near future

    Cheers!
    TB Ballistic Black/Iberian Dyneema backpacks and briefcases for every occasion together with my cherished Nordic and Solar Dyneema!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •