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  1. #1
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    The Guide's Pack for Walking the Camino de Santiago?

    Twelve years ago, I spent ten days on an inn-to-inn walk through the English Lake District on the Cumbria Way. It's still one of the best vacations I've ever taken.

    Before my old legs give out, I'd like to do a walk of a month or so on the Camino de Santiago, perhaps starting in France or Portugal. I'm looking for thoughts on a suitable back pack. Obviously, the pack should have enough capacity for such a trip, and should be comfortable day after day with a good load.

    For anyone willing to use a top-loading rather than panel-loading pack (I am), the Guide's Pack seems ideal. The panel loaders I've looked at include the Aston House Backcountry from Hill People Gear, and the Avail 2200 from Stone Glacier. All three are roughly in the range of 30 to 35 liters. Links to the other two packs here:

    https://hillpeoplegear.com/Products/...3/ProductID/82

    https://www.stoneglacier.com/collect...cts/avail-2200

    Any thoughts on the Guide's Pack versus the other two or suggestions for a different pack would be very much appreciated. Thank you!
    Last edited by Buffalonian; 11-11-2018 at 01:21 PM.

  2. #2
    Volunteer Moderator bartleby's Avatar
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    Location: Germany / Hobbies: Photography & Guitars
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    I really love the Guide's Pack for its classic look and functionality and I did use it already for extensive hikes (e.g. https://forums.tombihn.com/photos-vi...tml#post166559). I strongly recommend the hip belt and I also found the side pockets really useful. I use the leads pocket and one normal side pocket which is great for water bottles. I don't know the other two backpacks you mentioned but from looking at the respective webpages they seem to be more technical. However, since you will be hiking every day for several hours I would definitely try them all and get the one that carries most comfortably.
    ...spread joy in your neighbourhood
    current bags: Smart Alec, Guide's Pack, Guide's Edition S25, Luminary 15, Daylight Backpack, Aeronaut 45, Tri-Star, Road Buddy 36, Daylight Briefcase, Small Yeoman Duffel, bits and pieces

  3. #3
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    Honestly, I'd say pass on TB for this. The two packs you linked seem very heavy as well... You don't need a billion MOLLE attachments and heavy-ass 9 million denier cordura. I forget the stat but its something like every oz on your back adds x feet (theoretically) to your walk. Bon Camino!

    The GP looks great but having walked the Camino before (two routes, Portuguese and Spain) there is a *lot* to be said for getting a lihgtweight backpack from an actual backpack manufacturer, from ULA, HMG, Osprey, or any number of large or cottage-industries. Having really good straps, a good hipbelt and weight distribution is really important for those long, slow miles.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by bintobeen View Post
    Honestly, I'd say pass on TB for this. The two packs you linked seem very heavy as well... You don't need a billion MOLLE attachments and heavy-ass 9 million denier cordura. I forget the stat but its something like every oz on your back adds x feet (theoretically) to your walk. Bon Camino!

    The GP looks great but having walked the Camino before (two routes, Portuguese and Spain) there is a *lot* to be said for getting a lihgtweight backpack from an actual backpack manufacturer, from ULA, HMG, Osprey, or any number of large or cottage-industries. Having really good straps, a good hipbelt and weight distribution is really important for those long, slow miles.
    I get what you're saying, but I don't know why you think Osprey's an "actual backpack" manufacturer and these folks are not. Both Hill People Gear and Stone Glacier make packs for back-country hunting. Their customer base is demanding, and in many respects their packs are far superior to Osprey.

    At 3.17 pounds, the Osprey Farpoint 40 is heavier than the Stone Glacier pack; and both packs have better straps, hip belts, and weight distribution than an Osprey. The Hill People Gear pack is heavier, but from everything I've read, their custom yoke is hands-down more comfortable than the straps on anything you'd get from Osprey or a similar manufacturer.

    And even if I went with the Hill People Gear pack, prudent choices about other gear would more than make up for the extra weight. I'd likely be walking with less weight than most people on the route.
    Last edited by Buffalonian; 11-19-2018 at 11:42 PM.

  5. #5
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    I wholeheartedly agree that some Osprey packs are heavier than other packs; I was merely saying that in general they are a "big box manufacturer" that makes good, sophisticated light packs with good harness systems. I confess that w/r/t Hill People and similar outfits (TAD, KUIU, etc) I am put off by the militaristic/hunting/jingoistic/"don't tread on me" identity branding, but I'm sure the former makes quality gear (and in the US too, which is great).

    My point was more to distinguish between packs that have a outside/hiking vibe but don't carry well - and I think that the Guide pack is something like that. There's a thread in the forums that engages similar discussion about the Hero's Journey that may be of use to you in this matter. Bottom line I am a huge TB fan but I do not think the harness systems are good enough for serious endeavors like full day hikes or multi-day treks with just your bag as your only companion.

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